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NEWS
December 1, 2013
President Obama will get a break from "Obamacare" when he pardons the traditional Thanksgiving turkey. Each of us can also set aside our cares by pardoning a turkey and choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance - one that gives thanks for our good fortune, health and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: •You will stay alert through the entire football game. •You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball?"
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Cereal makers have long designed eye-catching boxes to lure children to supermarket breakfast aisles. Now, grocers and produce companies are turning to Big Bird and other "Sesame Street" characters in an effort to make fruits and vegetables just as appealing. An emerging national movement that uses the Muppets to market vegetables to preschoolers got a foothold in Baltimore last week when it was adopted by two area businesses — Mars Super Markets and Savage-based East Coast Fresh, a Mars vendor and processor of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1991
MIAMI -- A new fruit, whose developer hopes can be an alternative to citrus crops in freeze-prone areas of Florida, is thriving in a South Dade County field.It is the unlikely union of a native American weed called the Maypop and a passion fruit, said Robert Knight, its creator. The horticulturist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture bent over microscopes for years manipulating its chromosomes in an effort to make it grow.His creation still doesn't have a name, but it does yield a fruit that ranges in color from light green to dark purple, measures about 3 inches around and has a tangy taste that is both sweet and sour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
NEWS
August 14, 1991
An error in the production process of yesterday's Anne Arundel County Sun resulted in switched photo captionsThe photo on the left is of Jenny Baucom (left) and Diane Deeds at a recent demonstration on making watermelon fruit baskets at the Glen Burnie Christian Women's Club.The photo on the right is of Esther Rosenblatt, widow of Rabbi Morris D. Rosenblatt, standing next to a stained glass window dedicated to his memory at the Kneseth Israel Congregation in Annapolis. The rabbi led the congregation for nearly 40 years until his retirement.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | August 25, 1991
Face facts: Nothing beats fresh fruit as a healthy dessert. It's ++ low in calories and sodium, high in fiber and vitamins, has no cholesterol and is naturally sweet.A perfectly ripe fruit can taste as delicious -- well, almost as delicious -- as a rich chocolate-filled, butter-laden flaky pastry. The trouble is that fruit rarely seems special or festive. Yet no rule requires fresh fruit to be dull. A little imagination and ingenuity transform fruits to treats.Simplest is sliced fresh fruit artfully arranged on a beautiful platter.
FEATURES
November 13, 1991
Pomegranates are so beautiful, with their mottled ruby-red skin and exotic, slightly angular shape, it seems a shame to destroy them to get at the juicy, tasty part inside. You must, though, if you wish to sample a delicacy that has been around apparently forever and has been celebrated, according to Elizabeth Schneider's "Uncommon Fruits and Vegetables," by poets, painters and storytellers from China to Greece to Persia to Israel to Rome.Pomegranates begin appearing on store shelves in late fall and early winter.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 1996
Weight controllers often think they can snack on fresh fruit at will, and still peel off the pounds. Not so.It's time to indulge in the sweetest natural treats now that summer fruit is at its peak. But don't go overboard. Too much of even a very good thing can frustrate your weight control efforts.A serving of fruit on most weight loss or maintenance plans provides about 60 calories. That's about the same as a slice of bread, half a small bagel, or a Fig Newton. We know we can't eat those endlessly, and it's the same with fresh fruit.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | August 1, 2007
August has arrived, and in Baltimore that means many of us want to avoid cooking entirely. But we still want to eat, of course, and we might even want to entertain. One solution is to make something pretty out of material that's cool, readily available and at its peak: fresh fruit. Baltimore International College chef instructor Ben Simpkins showed us how to make a centerpiece for the picnic table with a few basic supplies. You'll need wooden skewers that can be cut into various lengths, toothpicks, a sharp paring knife, and some leaf and flower-shaped cookie cutters.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1995
Q: Sometimes I see eggplant and tomatoes referred to as fruits. I thought they were vegetables. Can you explain?A: It is confusing to understand what separates a fruit from a vegetable. The fruit is the part of a flowering plant that develops from the ovaryand contains the seeds. This includes sweet fleshy fruits and some vegetables like zucchini, eggplant, cucumber, tomatoes, sweet peppers and nuts. Vegetables are herbaceous plants cultivated for food. Different parts of the vegetables are eaten.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
The Bard family loves tooling around Columbia on bikes, whether it's to visit the library or attend an event at the lakefront. It's a healthy way to go, but the family of five noticed that when they arrived at their destinations, the food offerings were not exactly green or clean. "At the summer concerts at the [Columbia] lakefront, the only food there was the ice cream truck," said Luda Bard. "Unless you bring your own food, there's nothing else to eat. " So Bard and her husband, Aaron, and their children Ammi, Ari and Ellie, always brought their own healthy snacks.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 30, 2014
For years, the Bard family has biked everywhere from libraries and farmer's markets to friends' homes and downtown Columbia events. Luda, Aaron and their children - Ammi, 3, Ari, 7, and Ellie, 9 - love traveling via bike, but the snacks available at most venues they bike to are limited, especially when two of their three children have food allergies, Luda Bard said. So they bring their own healthy food along for the ride. "At the summer concerts at the [Columbia] lakefront, the only food there was the ice cream truck," she said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The long, cold winter was good to farmers and gardeners as frigid temperatures and blankets of snow helped kill pests and moisten soil. So when spring arrived, early bloomers surged to life. Then came plunging temperatures, frost and even snow Tuesday and Wednesday nights. The winter already almost certainly means Marylanders will have to wait a few weeks longer than normal for a peach cake or strawberry shortcake topped with local produce. Now farmers are nervously waiting to learn whether two late-season frosts could damage or kill significant portions of blooming plum and peach trees, which are flowering now and particularly vulnerable to cold.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
As three Arabbers rode through South Baltimore on their horse-drawn fruit cart, a Chevrolet Impala barreled toward them. The men jumped off just before the car slammed their wagon into a utility pole, spilling watermelons and cantaloupes across the sidewalk. Tony, the tan Palomino that had been pulling the cart, escaped with only minor scratches. He was soon munching grass in a nearby median. The produce vendors consider themselves lucky to have survived, but the incident last year was one of several recent crashes that have put Baltimore's community of Arabbers on edge.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Baltimore City plans to help corner stores in West Baltimore stock healthier fare, and get kids and their parents interested in buying it, as part of an effort to reduce childhood obesity. Though on the decline among young children nationally, obesity remains a major problem in U.S. cities such as Baltimore, where about a quarter of students are excessively overweight and potentially at risk for lifelong health problems. Officials at the Baltimore City Health Department have identified limited access to low-cost and appealing healthy food as a barrier to reducing obesity and have worked to reduce the number of "food deserts" in low-income neighborhoods through programs such as a virtual supermarket that allows participants in public housing and elsewhere to order healthy food online for delivery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014
From: California Price: $5 Serve: Pizza, pasta, chili, hamburgers Yes, Gallo Hearty Burgundy. You got a problem with that? This iconic wine, which led Gallo's move away from sweet fortified wines and into the realm of table wine, is celebrating its 50 t h anniversary. For as long as I can remember it's been a superb value. In 1972, "Time" put the wine on its cover and called it the best wine value in the United States. Not much has changed. It offers generous fruit, vinified dry, and a soft texture.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 19, 2006
You will know them by their fruits. Are grapes gathered from thorns, or figs from thistles? ... A sound tree cannot bear evil fruit, nor can a bad tree bear good fruit. - Matthew 7:16,18 In 1980, a book was published about the failure of liberal policies in New York City. Its title, The Cost of Good Intentions, soon became a conservative catchphrase about the limits of expansive government. Even the best motives could produce dismal results. Policies had to be judged not by their ostensible purposes but by their consequences in the real world.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | July 2, 2008
Which fruit ripen after they are picked - and why? For the lowdown on ripening, I called the postharvest information center at the University of California, Davis (postharvest.ucdavis.edu) and the California Tree Fruit Agreement (eatcaliforniafruit.com). Ripening, I learned, is a complex process involving three changes in fruit: Starch is converted to sugar; acidity levels decrease, and the cell walls of the fruit begin to break down, making the fruit soften. Not every fruit experiences all these changes, but all of them experience at least one. Climacteric fruit ripen after they are picked; nonclimacteric fruit do not. Nonclimacteric fruit include pineapples, cherries, grapes, citrus fruit, berries and watermelon.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun and By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Rick and Carol Bernstein started gardening with their three children on a third of an acre at their former home in Parkton, selling the produce at a roadside stand and taking extras to their local food bank. That was two decades ago, and the food bank workers were surprised to receive donations other than canned goods and dry pasta. Eventually, as the Baltimore County couple realized just how scarce produce is on the tables of the poor, they founded First Fruits Farm, a Christian ministry run entirely by volunteers.
NEWS
December 1, 2013
President Obama will get a break from "Obamacare" when he pardons the traditional Thanksgiving turkey. Each of us can also set aside our cares by pardoning a turkey and choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance - one that gives thanks for our good fortune, health and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: •You will stay alert through the entire football game. •You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball?"
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