Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFrozen Vegetables
IN THE NEWS

Frozen Vegetables

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | December 9, 1998
* Item: Green Giant frozen vegetables* What you get: 1 to 3 servings* Cost: About $1.75* Preparation time: 4 1/2 to 6 minutes in microwave, 13 to 15 minutes on stove top* Review: Green Giant has retooled old favorites and added new flavors to its extensive repertoire with great results. Among the new offerings in the easily recognized 10-ounce box are Southwestern Style Corn & Roasted Red Peppers and Teriyaki Vegetables. The corn includes julienne strips of roasted red and cooked green peppers in a very light tomato-based sauce that's a tad more elegant than the average corn medley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
From coffee in the morning to a burger at lunch to a chicken breast and salad for dinner, most food now costs more - 5, 10, even 25 percent more - than it did a year ago. Higher crop and fuel prices are behind the rise, but saving money on food doesn't have to involve keeping cows in the backyard, say shopping advisers and some creative grocery-goers. Some even say shoppers should avoid those nettlesome coupons if the food is unhealthful or unneeded. The savings may take some extra work but only a little sacrifice: cooking more at home, eating leftovers, buying in bulk, forgoing out-of-season produce and some meat, and above all, planning.
Advertisement
FEATURES
February 27, 1991
Surprise your family with a main dish featuring savory vegetables and pasta for a simple meal. This meatless main dish is an update on the traditional pasta casserole. Layers of spaghetti and vegetables are baked in a velvety white Parmesan sauce, subtly flavored with thyme. Frozen vegetables, packed in pour and store plastic bags make preparation a snap. There's no cleaning, peeling or chopping.Broccoli Cauliflower Tetrazzini8 ounces uncooked spaghetti, broken into thirds1 16-ounce package frozen vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower and carrots2 tablespoons margarine or butter3 tablespoons flour2 cups milk1 teaspoon instant chicken bouillon1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheeseDash pepper1 4.5 ounce jar sliced mushrooms, drained2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheeseCook spaghetti to desired doneness as directed on package.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | April 11, 2007
The windows were rattling as the cold wind swirled recently. I was wishing for warmer weather and, with it, the fresh vegetables that come with it. But no English peas or baby artichokes were in sight. There were, however, frozen vegetables in the freezer and artichoke hearts in the cupboard. I combined them with a pilaf made with rice and ham. It wasn't a spring dish, but it satisfied my cravings. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 21, 2004
Looking for a sweet gift idea for your valentine? How about giving your honey a set of artisanal honey from www.beehivebee products.com? The set comes with nine single-ounce vials corked and sealed with beeswax. Varieties include orange blossom, buckwheat and raspberry. The set is accompanied by a wooden display block and a detailed description of each honey. Price is $45 plus $9 for shipping. Whisks that work wonders Whether you're mixing a salad dressing or frothing a cup of hot chocolate, kitchen toolmaker Kuhn Rikon has a whisk for you. The company's new collection includes the Galaxy Spring Whisk, a 10-inch-long tool designed to whip up small amounts of heavy cream or make lump-free pancake batter.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | April 11, 2007
The windows were rattling as the cold wind swirled recently. I was wishing for warmer weather and, with it, the fresh vegetables that come with it. But no English peas or baby artichokes were in sight. There were, however, frozen vegetables in the freezer and artichoke hearts in the cupboard. I combined them with a pilaf made with rice and ham. It wasn't a spring dish, but it satisfied my cravings. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
I want my children to develop better eating habits (less fast food and sugar, more fresh fruit and vegetables), but it's an expensive and time-consuming change. Any suggestions for a working mother on a budget? Dr. Katherine Battle Horgen, a consultant for the Yale Center for Eating and Weight Disorders and co-author of Food Fight, a new book addressing the Amer-ican obesity epidemic, offers these suggestions. To save money, take advantage of seasonal discounts on produce and freeze what you don't eat for later use as fruit smoothies or vegetable purees.
FEATURES
By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE Rita Calvert contributed to this article | January 31, 1996
Preparing one of the classics is a good way to satisfy the need to nestle up to something familiar, comforting and tasty during the winter season, when we like to lie low and simplify. But some of these time-honored dishes require days of shopping for ingredients and even more time spent chopping, peeling, stewing and assembling.The solution is easy: classics made with a few shortcuts that add to the quality of your life but don't detract from the quality of the dish.Classic stews and casseroles are the ideal dinner this time of year.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
These are the times that try women's diets. Long, lemony yellow days invite us to linger outside . . . to relax, unwind, slow the pace. But final projects and papers are due, exams are pending, weddings and graduations demand buying new clothes and gifts and planning parties, on top of already hectic schedules. In between, dance recitals and little league games vie for our attention.All those good resolutions about healthy eating and good nutrition tend to get lost in the shuffle now. But healthy eating tends to keep us glued together during tough times.
FEATURES
By Laura Reiley and Laura Reiley,Special to The Sun | March 30, 1994
At the last census there were 94,000,000 households in this country. There were 23,000,000 Americans living by themselves. That means every fourth household may harbor someone popping a frozen dinner in the microwave, or gingerly leaning over the sink nibbling from a saucepan with a wooden spoon.March is Nutrition Month, and high time for single households to turn over a new culinary leaf. Singles have long justified eating out, pigging out on prepared foods. They lament that it just isn't economical or time-efficient to really cook for themselves.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 21, 2004
Looking for a sweet gift idea for your valentine? How about giving your honey a set of artisanal honey from www.beehivebee products.com? The set comes with nine single-ounce vials corked and sealed with beeswax. Varieties include orange blossom, buckwheat and raspberry. The set is accompanied by a wooden display block and a detailed description of each honey. Price is $45 plus $9 for shipping. Whisks that work wonders Whether you're mixing a salad dressing or frothing a cup of hot chocolate, kitchen toolmaker Kuhn Rikon has a whisk for you. The company's new collection includes the Galaxy Spring Whisk, a 10-inch-long tool designed to whip up small amounts of heavy cream or make lump-free pancake batter.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
I want my children to develop better eating habits (less fast food and sugar, more fresh fruit and vegetables), but it's an expensive and time-consuming change. Any suggestions for a working mother on a budget? Dr. Katherine Battle Horgen, a consultant for the Yale Center for Eating and Weight Disorders and co-author of Food Fight, a new book addressing the Amer-ican obesity epidemic, offers these suggestions. To save money, take advantage of seasonal discounts on produce and freeze what you don't eat for later use as fruit smoothies or vegetable purees.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | December 9, 1998
* Item: Green Giant frozen vegetables* What you get: 1 to 3 servings* Cost: About $1.75* Preparation time: 4 1/2 to 6 minutes in microwave, 13 to 15 minutes on stove top* Review: Green Giant has retooled old favorites and added new flavors to its extensive repertoire with great results. Among the new offerings in the easily recognized 10-ounce box are Southwestern Style Corn & Roasted Red Peppers and Teriyaki Vegetables. The corn includes julienne strips of roasted red and cooked green peppers in a very light tomato-based sauce that's a tad more elegant than the average corn medley.
FEATURES
By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE Rita Calvert contributed to this article | January 31, 1996
Preparing one of the classics is a good way to satisfy the need to nestle up to something familiar, comforting and tasty during the winter season, when we like to lie low and simplify. But some of these time-honored dishes require days of shopping for ingredients and even more time spent chopping, peeling, stewing and assembling.The solution is easy: classics made with a few shortcuts that add to the quality of your life but don't detract from the quality of the dish.Classic stews and casseroles are the ideal dinner this time of year.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | September 20, 1994
Recently I met with some health-oriented folks who admitted they don't eat three vegetables a day, the current recommendation of the National Cancer Institute and the Food Guide Pyramid. Their reason: they don't know how to prepare them.This is a common complaint among Generation Xers who feed in fast-food shops where french fries predominate. It rings true, too, among singles of all ages who rely on microwave food for sustenance. But some vegetables are close at hand for both these groups.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
These are the times that try women's diets. Long, lemony yellow days invite us to linger outside . . . to relax, unwind, slow the pace. But final projects and papers are due, exams are pending, weddings and graduations demand buying new clothes and gifts and planning parties, on top of already hectic schedules. In between, dance recitals and little league games vie for our attention.All those good resolutions about healthy eating and good nutrition tend to get lost in the shuffle now. But healthy eating tends to keep us glued together during tough times.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 21, 1990
Home gardeners this time of year have forgotten about the costs and the labor. This is harvest season, and they're busy distributing the bounty to their friends and neighbors. If you are -- offered the tomatoes, cucumbers and zucchini, don't hesitate. Accept all of it.It's the best fresh food you will have all year. And any you can't eat right now you should freeze. So say agriculture experts at the University of California in Davis.Here's why: Even "fresh" vegetables purchased at the supermarket usually aren't.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | September 20, 1994
Recently I met with some health-oriented folks who admitted they don't eat three vegetables a day, the current recommendation of the National Cancer Institute and the Food Guide Pyramid. Their reason: they don't know how to prepare them.This is a common complaint among Generation Xers who feed in fast-food shops where french fries predominate. It rings true, too, among singles of all ages who rely on microwave food for sustenance. But some vegetables are close at hand for both these groups.
FEATURES
By Laura Reiley and Laura Reiley,Special to The Sun | March 30, 1994
At the last census there were 94,000,000 households in this country. There were 23,000,000 Americans living by themselves. That means every fourth household may harbor someone popping a frozen dinner in the microwave, or gingerly leaning over the sink nibbling from a saucepan with a wooden spoon.March is Nutrition Month, and high time for single households to turn over a new culinary leaf. Singles have long justified eating out, pigging out on prepared foods. They lament that it just isn't economical or time-efficient to really cook for themselves.
FEATURES
February 27, 1991
Surprise your family with a main dish featuring savory vegetables and pasta for a simple meal. This meatless main dish is an update on the traditional pasta casserole. Layers of spaghetti and vegetables are baked in a velvety white Parmesan sauce, subtly flavored with thyme. Frozen vegetables, packed in pour and store plastic bags make preparation a snap. There's no cleaning, peeling or chopping.Broccoli Cauliflower Tetrazzini8 ounces uncooked spaghetti, broken into thirds1 16-ounce package frozen vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower and carrots2 tablespoons margarine or butter3 tablespoons flour2 cups milk1 teaspoon instant chicken bouillon1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheeseDash pepper1 4.5 ounce jar sliced mushrooms, drained2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheeseCook spaghetti to desired doneness as directed on package.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.