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By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | May 16, 2007
On a recent afternoon spent food shopping and cooking with my dad, he asked me some really good questions. Two of them were: Why did you shake that bag of frozen peas? And why did you cut the ends of the asparagus when we got home? I shook the bag of peas to discern its shipping history. Back in the olden days, peas and other vegetables were frozen into a block of ice, but now the industry standard is for IQF, or individually quick freezing. IQF peas are placed on a conveyor belt and then rolled into a very cold chamber, where they are instantly frozen while still remaining separate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Eris Weaver from Cotati, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a pasta salad made with salmon, peas and cottage cheese in the dressing. We had no luck locating the actual recipe, which the reader said came from a newsletter put out by Pacific Gas and Electric sometime in the mid- to late-1980s. However, it seemed like it was worth some research to try and find something similar. This is the time of year when cold pasta salads can make for a wonderful meal, and the combination sounded appetizing.
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FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Easy cheese and pasta is low in fat, high in carbohydrates, and provides important nutrients, including protein. The dish takes about 10 minutes to prepare.Cook fun-shaped pasta like wagon wheels or rotelle. Add frozen peas and corn kernels during the last minute of cooking time. Drain and toss with shredded Cheddar cheese until it melts. Add cherry tomatoes and prepared salsa.Easy Cheese and Pasta8 ounces (3 1/4 cups) wagon wheel or rotelle pasta1 cup frozen peas1 cup frozen corn kernels4 ounces (about 1 cup)
NEWS
By Deborah Stone and Deborah Stone,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2008
I've never been one to eat peas. As a child, my mother insisted I finish my vegetables, so I swallowed peas like pills with my iced tea. How do I explain that I now find myself befriending not just one serving, but an entire bag? Frozen peas are just the ticket for reducing swelling after an eye job. I don't really like admitting to vanity, but I'm convinced that denial does no good. It's like lying about your age. What's the point? After you lie, you're no younger. So, I might as well own up and be done with it. Now I officially become one of "those" women.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 30, 2000
The past few years my local markets have been stocking more varieties of cabbage than just the common, round, green heads. Cabbages fall into two categories: those that are round and form hearts and those that are elongated. The green cabbages, the ones with the tightly packed, waxy leaves, fall in the first class along with the Savoys, which are distinguished by their attractive ruffled leaves. Red cabbages also belong to this genre. Napas, or Chinese cabbages, are the most readily available of the tall, slender types.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1994
In the Fast & Fresh column in Wednesday's A La Carte section, it was unclear which dish the carrots, raisins, mayonnaise and lemon juice were for. They are the ingredients ** for a carrot-raisin salad to accompany the tuna casserole.The Sun regrets the error.That old standby, tuna noodle casserole, is one of those comfy convenient dishes that's remained a family classic. The original version could use some calorie trimming, however, so we've come up with a delicious new variation that's so simple, even the kids can help.
FEATURES
By Carol J.G. Ward and Carol J.G. Ward,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 1996
Getting good nutrition is a snap with peas. They're high in protein and fiber and low in fat and sodium, and contain no cholesterol.Fresh green peas, also known as English peas, shell peas or garden peas, also are an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C and iron, writes Carol Ann Rinzler in "The Complete Book of Food."When buying peas, look for fresh, firm, bright-green pea pods. The pods should feel velvety, and fresh pea pods should be plump and unblemished and look full with round fat peas inside.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
"Green M&M's," that's what a friend's children call the sweet, succulent young peas that come fresh from the family garden plot this time of year.In my own, much smaller, garden, I have planted peas for the past two years. Last year the weather got too hot too early, and the crop languished. This year the dozen or so plants are producing valiantly, but I can't seem to get the peas into thehouse before they're eaten.Fortunately, fresh peas are available at groceries and farmers markets, and tiny new peas are almost as good frozen as they are fresh (freezing retains their sweetness)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
When Hilton Braithwaite began working in restaurants in his native Cambridge, Mass., while still in high school, he knew he was making money. "But I didn't know what I was acquiring was a trade," he said. "That I could always find work."These days, after a stint as a photography teacher at Howard University, he is back to being a chef, at Mount Vernon's Central Station restaurant.Photography and cooking have always been the two driving factors in Braithwaite's life. He finds both challenging and rewarding, and cooking is always there if art leads to lean times.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 19, 2007
Like most cooks, when I decide to have a dinner party, I usually pick the main course first, then figure out the rest of the menu. Rarely does a side dish become the inspiration for a meal. This past week, however, after testing a recipe for buttered orzo tossed with peas, fresh mint and parmigiano-reggiano cheese, I changed my mind. I was so excited about this delectable spring pasta and vegetable creation that I planned an entire menu around it for a coming dinner for friends. Orzo, the oval-shaped pasta that looks like large grains of rice, can be cooked simply in boiling salted water for a few minutes until tender, then drained, tossed in butter and if desired, seasoned with some grated cheese such as parmesan.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | April 30, 2008
Imagine making a fashion statement by eating fresh peas. Although the idea may seem silly today, indulging in little green legumes was all the rage in 17th-century Europe. It was so popular that it sparked commentary from the court of King Louis XIV. In 1696, according to The Penguin Companion to Food by Alan Davidson, Madame de Maintenon, the king's second wife, wrote: "There are some ladies who, having supped, and supped well, take peas at home before going to bed at the risk of an attack of indigestion.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 19, 2007
Like most cooks, when I decide to have a dinner party, I usually pick the main course first, then figure out the rest of the menu. Rarely does a side dish become the inspiration for a meal. This past week, however, after testing a recipe for buttered orzo tossed with peas, fresh mint and parmigiano-reggiano cheese, I changed my mind. I was so excited about this delectable spring pasta and vegetable creation that I planned an entire menu around it for a coming dinner for friends. Orzo, the oval-shaped pasta that looks like large grains of rice, can be cooked simply in boiling salted water for a few minutes until tender, then drained, tossed in butter and if desired, seasoned with some grated cheese such as parmesan.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | May 16, 2007
On a recent afternoon spent food shopping and cooking with my dad, he asked me some really good questions. Two of them were: Why did you shake that bag of frozen peas? And why did you cut the ends of the asparagus when we got home? I shook the bag of peas to discern its shipping history. Back in the olden days, peas and other vegetables were frozen into a block of ice, but now the industry standard is for IQF, or individually quick freezing. IQF peas are placed on a conveyor belt and then rolled into a very cold chamber, where they are instantly frozen while still remaining separate.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 30, 2000
The past few years my local markets have been stocking more varieties of cabbage than just the common, round, green heads. Cabbages fall into two categories: those that are round and form hearts and those that are elongated. The green cabbages, the ones with the tightly packed, waxy leaves, fall in the first class along with the Savoys, which are distinguished by their attractive ruffled leaves. Red cabbages also belong to this genre. Napas, or Chinese cabbages, are the most readily available of the tall, slender types.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
When Hilton Braithwaite began working in restaurants in his native Cambridge, Mass., while still in high school, he knew he was making money. "But I didn't know what I was acquiring was a trade," he said. "That I could always find work."These days, after a stint as a photography teacher at Howard University, he is back to being a chef, at Mount Vernon's Central Station restaurant.Photography and cooking have always been the two driving factors in Braithwaite's life. He finds both challenging and rewarding, and cooking is always there if art leads to lean times.
FEATURES
By Carol J.G. Ward and Carol J.G. Ward,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 20, 1996
Getting good nutrition is a snap with peas. They're high in protein and fiber and low in fat and sodium, and contain no cholesterol.Fresh green peas, also known as English peas, shell peas or garden peas, also are an excellent source of vitamin A and a good source of vitamin C and iron, writes Carol Ann Rinzler in "The Complete Book of Food."When buying peas, look for fresh, firm, bright-green pea pods. The pods should feel velvety, and fresh pea pods should be plump and unblemished and look full with round fat peas inside.
NEWS
By Deborah Stone and Deborah Stone,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2008
I've never been one to eat peas. As a child, my mother insisted I finish my vegetables, so I swallowed peas like pills with my iced tea. How do I explain that I now find myself befriending not just one serving, but an entire bag? Frozen peas are just the ticket for reducing swelling after an eye job. I don't really like admitting to vanity, but I'm convinced that denial does no good. It's like lying about your age. What's the point? After you lie, you're no younger. So, I might as well own up and be done with it. Now I officially become one of "those" women.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | July 30, 1995
Steamed crabs, crab cakes and crab soup are among the choices that will be on hand at the 13th annual CrabFest next weekend at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. There will also be bratwurst, french fries, corn on the cob and homemade baked goods to sample. Activities include crab races (enter your favorite for 50 cents); rides aboard the Mister Jim, a replica of an old oyster boat ($2 per person); demonstrations of seafood-industry skills such as crab picking, net making and crab fishing; and a showing of the movie "The Blue Crab," about the life-cycle of the crab.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,Universal Press Syndicate | October 9, 1994
There's more to Mexican food than cheesy, greasy enchiladas, burritos and chips.Mexican-restaurant fare took a beating from the Center for Science in the Public Interest this summer. The consumer group grabbed headlines with its report that Mexican food is loaded with fat. But there's a lighter side to Mexican food, and it's as authentic and traditional as Old Mexico."There's a big difference between the Mexican food that people eat in the United States and what they eat in Mexico," says Rick Bayless, author of "Authentic Mexican" (William Morrow and Co., $24.95)
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