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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
No player personified the 1989 Orioles more than Mickey Tettleton, the poster boy for the "Why Not?" crew that nearly won a pennant. Spurned by other clubs, Tettleton joined Baltimore and blossomed in that magical summer as the no-name Orioles gave fans the ride of their lives. That the Birds battled the Toronto Blue Jays to the wire before losing the American League flag was attributable greatly to Tettleton, the Popeye-armed journeyman catcher who batted with a chaw in his cheek and a stance all his own. So what if he stood soldier-straight at the plate, abandoning the hitter's crouch?
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NEWS
February 25, 2010
As I glanced at the headline of last Monday's article, "When terrorist and '60s child converge" (Feb. 22) by Susan Reimer, I thought that it would be yet another aged hippie opining about why America's enemies are justified. I was not disappointed. In some ways, she was right. Shows like "The Bachelor" and "The Real Housewives of Orange County," while entertaining, portray people whose hot tubs far surpass their character in terms of depth. I am ashamed to have seen shows that match "The Bachelor" in mindless entertainment, but does this mean that I should be wiped from the face of the earth by the likes of the underwear bomber?
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Service | August 7, 1998
Toucan Sam, the cartoon spokesbird for Kellogg's Froot Loops cereal, turned 35 this week. Some things you may not know about Mr. Sam:Toucan Sam originally had a much larger snout, but in the early 1970s, cosmetic surgeons gave him a "beak job" and shortened his bill.He has never married, but he does have three nephews.His accent was inspired by actor Ronald Colman, but in early TV commercials, he spoke "Toucanese," a variation of pig Latin. Cartoon vocalist Mel Blanc supplied the original voice for Sam, but Paul Frees (the voice of Boris Badenov in "Bullwinkle")
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
No player personified the 1989 Orioles more than Mickey Tettleton, the poster boy for the "Why Not?" crew that nearly won a pennant. Spurned by other clubs, Tettleton joined Baltimore and blossomed in that magical summer as the no-name Orioles gave fans the ride of their lives. That the Birds battled the Toronto Blue Jays to the wire before losing the American League flag was attributable greatly to Tettleton, the Popeye-armed journeyman catcher who batted with a chaw in his cheek and a stance all his own. So what if he stood soldier-straight at the plate, abandoning the hitter's crouch?
FEATURES
By The Boston Globe | October 10, 1998
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- You might say that Scott Bruce is up to his old Trix.For a decade, he has dedicated his professional life to vintage cereal boxes and prizes -- "cerealectibles." He has amassed a world-class collection, and talks eagerly of plans for a cereal hall of fame in Orlando or Las Vegas. And he's just published "Cereal Boxes & Prizes: 1960s," the second decade-by-decade tribute to the genre.The 43-year-old one-time sculptor is quite serious about Frosted Flakes and Froot Loops, about Tony the Tiger and Toucan Sam. He points out that such goods are "universal commodities that found their way to every breakfast table in America."
NEWS
June 15, 2009
H1N1 vaccine may not be ready in time for fall As the World Health Organization declared a global flu pandemic last week, raising the alert to its highest level, federal health officials said it was unclear whether an effective vaccine would be available by fall. Federal and local health officials are eyeing the Southern Hemisphere, where the virus is already on an unstoppable course and where it's feared it might combine with the seasonal flu strain and develop drug resistance. The U.S. government has invested $1 billion toward vaccine production.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
As I glanced at the headline of last Monday's article, "When terrorist and '60s child converge" (Feb. 22) by Susan Reimer, I thought that it would be yet another aged hippie opining about why America's enemies are justified. I was not disappointed. In some ways, she was right. Shows like "The Bachelor" and "The Real Housewives of Orange County," while entertaining, portray people whose hot tubs far surpass their character in terms of depth. I am ashamed to have seen shows that match "The Bachelor" in mindless entertainment, but does this mean that I should be wiped from the face of the earth by the likes of the underwear bomber?
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 14, 2007
Froot Loops' days on Saturday morning television may be numbered. The Kellogg Co., based in Battle Creek, Mich., said yesterday that it would phase out advertising its products to children younger than age 12 unless the foods meet specific nutrition guidelines for calories, sugar, fat and sodium. Kellogg also announced that it would stop using licensed characters or branded toys to promote foods unless the products meet the nutrition guidelines.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 22, 1992
THERE IS nothing quite like starting the day with a heaping bowl of Cap'n Crunch cereal and watching your hands tremble violently as that first jolt of sugar hits the central nervous system.Top if off with three or four cups of strong coffee and by mid-morning, you're speeding around like a jittery fox terrier, ready to tackle (sometimes literally) that new client or whip through those household chores or clear a dozen acres of trees and heavy underbrush using nothing more than a hatchet and old-fashioned elbow grease.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 28, 1990
When I saw the story yesterday morning on Page 9 of the sports section, I almost spilled my Froot Loops (funny, I haven't hit many homers recently either). There, buried deep in the paper, was the best sports story of the year: ATHLETE GIVES BACK MONEY TO TEAM.This is news, folks. This is not simply man bites dog. This is man marries dog and moves next door.Do you need any more evidence that the Greed Decade is officially over? Donald Trump is nearly broke, Ronald Reagan nearly forgotten and Charlie Keating nearly in jail.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
H1N1 vaccine may not be ready in time for fall As the World Health Organization declared a global flu pandemic last week, raising the alert to its highest level, federal health officials said it was unclear whether an effective vaccine would be available by fall. Federal and local health officials are eyeing the Southern Hemisphere, where the virus is already on an unstoppable course and where it's feared it might combine with the seasonal flu strain and develop drug resistance. The U.S. government has invested $1 billion toward vaccine production.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
Imre Kovacsi kept a nail through a deadbolt on a side door to his Glen Burnie home and a chain with a lock around the front door. He often padlocked a fence around the backyard. But the first line of defense was the lock on the door to his wife's room, which was reversed so she couldn't get out on her own. He was desperate to keep Kathy Kovacsi, only 57 but suffering from advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, from wandering out of the home. But on July 16, she somehow managed to slip out. Sometime between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., she apparently left through a side door with a loose latch and walked to a nearby fire station.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 14, 2007
Froot Loops' days on Saturday morning television may be numbered. The Kellogg Co., based in Battle Creek, Mich., said yesterday that it would phase out advertising its products to children younger than age 12 unless the foods meet specific nutrition guidelines for calories, sugar, fat and sodium. Kellogg also announced that it would stop using licensed characters or branded toys to promote foods unless the products meet the nutrition guidelines.
FEATURES
By The Boston Globe | October 10, 1998
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- You might say that Scott Bruce is up to his old Trix.For a decade, he has dedicated his professional life to vintage cereal boxes and prizes -- "cerealectibles." He has amassed a world-class collection, and talks eagerly of plans for a cereal hall of fame in Orlando or Las Vegas. And he's just published "Cereal Boxes & Prizes: 1960s," the second decade-by-decade tribute to the genre.The 43-year-old one-time sculptor is quite serious about Frosted Flakes and Froot Loops, about Tony the Tiger and Toucan Sam. He points out that such goods are "universal commodities that found their way to every breakfast table in America."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Service | August 7, 1998
Toucan Sam, the cartoon spokesbird for Kellogg's Froot Loops cereal, turned 35 this week. Some things you may not know about Mr. Sam:Toucan Sam originally had a much larger snout, but in the early 1970s, cosmetic surgeons gave him a "beak job" and shortened his bill.He has never married, but he does have three nephews.His accent was inspired by actor Ronald Colman, but in early TV commercials, he spoke "Toucanese," a variation of pig Latin. Cartoon vocalist Mel Blanc supplied the original voice for Sam, but Paul Frees (the voice of Boris Badenov in "Bullwinkle")
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 22, 1992
THERE IS nothing quite like starting the day with a heaping bowl of Cap'n Crunch cereal and watching your hands tremble violently as that first jolt of sugar hits the central nervous system.Top if off with three or four cups of strong coffee and by mid-morning, you're speeding around like a jittery fox terrier, ready to tackle (sometimes literally) that new client or whip through those household chores or clear a dozen acres of trees and heavy underbrush using nothing more than a hatchet and old-fashioned elbow grease.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
Imre Kovacsi kept a nail through a deadbolt on a side door to his Glen Burnie home and a chain with a lock around the front door. He often padlocked a fence around the backyard. But the first line of defense was the lock on the door to his wife's room, which was reversed so she couldn't get out on her own. He was desperate to keep Kathy Kovacsi, only 57 but suffering from advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, from wandering out of the home. But on July 16, she somehow managed to slip out. Sometime between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., she apparently left through a side door with a loose latch and walked to a nearby fire station.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
An oyster potpie and a recipe for bark candy offer delicious possibilities.Jane Wilcox of Baltimore wrote: "Please help me find an oyster pot pie. I have searched every cookbook for months and have been unable to find one." Her response came from Carol A. Walls of Laurel, who sent a recipe called Galway oyster potpie. It originally was created by Jackie Stephens of Nashville, Tenn., for the 15th Annual Anniversary Edition National Oyster Cook-Off.Bark candy is what Judy Wilkerson of Edgemont, S.D., wanted -- only she didn't know it. She requested a recipe with a "name unknown."
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 28, 1990
When I saw the story yesterday morning on Page 9 of the sports section, I almost spilled my Froot Loops (funny, I haven't hit many homers recently either). There, buried deep in the paper, was the best sports story of the year: ATHLETE GIVES BACK MONEY TO TEAM.This is news, folks. This is not simply man bites dog. This is man marries dog and moves next door.Do you need any more evidence that the Greed Decade is officially over? Donald Trump is nearly broke, Ronald Reagan nearly forgotten and Charlie Keating nearly in jail.
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