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July 10, 1991
A Maryland state flag, carried by Marine Gunnery Sgt. Kenneth Ian Boucher of Shady Side during Operation Desert Storm, was presented to the Capt. Salem Avery House Museum and its sponsor, the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society, during the recent July 4 celebration at the museum.Boucher, who serves with the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, based in Cherry Point, N.C., is the son of Isabel Boucher of Shady Side. He was honored during the parade.Boucher carried the flag with him when he landed in Saudi Arabia and up to the Kuwaiti border.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
If you want to understand the chaos that is now Iraq with ISIS on the rise and almost everything America thought it had built crashing down, don't miss Frontline's "Losing Iraq" at  10 tomorrow night on PBS. No one on TV has done better investigative and long-form journalism on Iraq than Frontline. Period. And Tuesday's "Losing Iraq" is a stunning catalog of American ignorance, arrogance, lies and senseless death and destruction. If you thought you were over George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld, this will make you seethe all over again at them and publications like the New York Times, which let Team Bush sell its lies and lead thousands of young Americans to their deaths.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
If you want to understand the chaos that is now Iraq with ISIS on the rise and almost everything America thought it had built crashing down, don't miss Frontline's "Losing Iraq" at  10 tomorrow night on PBS. No one on TV has done better investigative and long-form journalism on Iraq than Frontline. Period. And Tuesday's "Losing Iraq" is a stunning catalog of American ignorance, arrogance, lies and senseless death and destruction. If you thought you were over George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld, this will make you seethe all over again at them and publications like the New York Times, which let Team Bush sell its lies and lead thousands of young Americans to their deaths.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | December 3, 2013
When this offseason started, the Orioles appeared to be a couple of key players away from moving to the next level and heading into 2014 with a realistic chance of playing deep into next October. Well, make it three. Now, with Jim Johnson headed to Oakland in a curious salary dump, Dan Duquette and Buck Showalter need to acquire or develop a frontline closer for that to be a realistic scenario, which only makes sense if they know something that you don't. We'll all have to wait and see how this plays out, since Duquette has delivered on his promise to make the Orioles a winning team, but the noise coming out of the Warehouse about "allocating resources" has the hollow ring of small-market philosophy that doesn't jibe with all those glowing reports of increased attendance and television ratings.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 20, 1990
"Springfield Goes to War" is more important for what it's part of than what it is.The "Frontline" special, airing at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), is part of a growing chorus of media voices demanding a national debate on America's involvement in the Persian Gulf.The tone and substance of much TV coverage of the Persian Gulf has changed significantly the last few weeks.Initially, there was great saber-rattling and cheerleading by TV newscasters. But as the real emotional and financial price of our involvement started to set in and public opinion about President Bush's military buildup started to shift, so has the coverage.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 11, 1990
Let's hope the news executives at our broadcast networks watch "The Arming of Iraq," the "Frontline" special at 8 tonight on PBS (Channels 22 and 67 locally).Maybe they will start to understand what has been so wrong with their let's-go-to-war coverage of the Persian Gulf crisis and emphasis on anchormen chasing "scoop" interviews in the region. They will see one of the major background stories they failed to report in their preoccupation with the rhetoric about "madmen"and posturings of patriotism.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 7, 1994
Los Angeles -- It's called "Tabloid Truth: The Michael Jackson Scandal." It's from "Frontline." And, even though it doesn't air on PBS until Feb. 15, it's creating a buzz on the press tour here.Surprisingly, neither the buzz nor the report is about Jackson and the allegations he faces of child sexual abuse."Michael Jackson: Did he or didn't he? This [report] answers that question not a whit." says "Frontline" producer Thomas Lennon. "I know nothing more about that than you and I have all read."
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 15, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Sometimes PBS' "Frontline" documentary series looks at a current event in the context of decades or even centuries of history to gain a different perspective.But, in the case of the current crisis in the Middle East, you only have to look back six months to gain a fresh viewpoint that sheds light on the conventional wisdom about this fast-breaking and quick-changing story."Frontline" does that tonight with "To the Brink of War," an hour scheduled for broadcast at 9 o'clock.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 26, 1991
Maryland Public Television is giving us a one-two combination of "Frontline" tonight and, as usual for this PBS documentary series, it delivers with a couple of solid punches.First up at 10 o'clock on channels 22 and 67 is "The Secret Story of Terry Waite," a BBC documentary that "Frontline" rushed onto its schedule following last week's release of Waite after almost five years of captivity in Lebanon.In the mid-1980s, Waite was a media darling. A tall, self-effacing Anglican church envoy, he seemed the embodiment of altruism, willing to risk his life as he negotiated for the release of Western hostages in Lebanon, apparently for no reason other than it was the right thing to do.When the Iran-contra scandal broke, the relationship of Oliver North and company to Waite was a small sidebar to the big story.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
A very disturbing "Frontline" on PBS tonight looks at the Navy's struggles to adapt itself and its thinking to '90s America."Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ernest as a prince? Glad I don't live in that country. Jim Varney (that irritating Ernest guy in all those movies and commercials) plays a prince who becomes infatuated with Jackie (Laurie Metcalf) after seeing her on TV. ABC."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Things are going so well for her and Paul that Jamie (Helen Hunt)
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Good morning from Nashville. No, the Orioles haven't traded for Billy Butler or signed Adam LaRoche yet. Hold your breath and you may turn Ravens' purple. As we get into the second day of the annual baseball meetings here, I'll try to sum up some things for you as we get ready for a whole new slew of rumors. The Orioles are hoping to make a deal adding a power bat. They've been saying it for a while. Some targets include Kansas City's Butler, Washington's Michael Morse and Pittsburgh's Garrett Jones.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Nobody does investigative journalism on TV like Public Television's "Frontline" -- nobody, and that includes "60 Minutes. " And Tuesday night at 9, the venerable series revisits Ft. Detrick in Frederick, Maryland, and the case of anthrax researcher Bruce Ivins who killed himself in 2008 as the FBI zeroed in on him as its prime suspect in the case of deadly envelopes of anthrax sent through the mail. According to this hard-edged report done in partnership with McClatchy Newspapers and Propublica, the FBI did more than zero in. Under tremendous pressure to solve the case that started in 2001 with anthrax mailed to U.S. senators and network anchors, the agency squeezed Ivins hard -- using every trick in the book to get a confession out of him even as he insisted on his innocence to the end. Ivins was a troubled guy with some distinctive kinks, the report acknowledges, but even FBI consultants in the case now admit that the agency overstated its evidence and never found a smoking gun to prove the researcher's guilt.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
The past few weeks have been rough on riders of MARC commuter trains, so it's understandable that some of them get upset. People want to get home from work and see their families at the end of a long day, and it's frustrating when a train is canceled or delayed. But hot weather and the inefficiencies of an antiquated system have taken a toll on civility at Union Station in Washington — and there have been increasing reports of ugly behavior toward staff members trying to do their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | March 12, 2010
Rajiv Chandrasekaran's tips for "further viewing" after "Green Zone" include: "No End in Sight" Charles Ferguson's 2007 documentary argues, persuasively, that the Iraqi insurgency could have been slowed, halted or contained, and daily life made infinitely safer for Iraqis, if the Bush administration listened to American public servants with solid military and Middle East experience. "It's a very powerful documentary," says Chandrasekaran, "and one of the chief reasons for its power is that you hear from the principal players on all policies and from all sides."
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Finally, the cavalry has arrived - or started to, anyway. I am talking about the arrival of serious, in-depth TV journalism that seeks to explain how it is that the U.S. economy went so far off the rails last fall that virtually all the economists are using the phony metaphor of a "perfect storm" to explain the collapse - while trying to absolve themselves of any responsibility for all the subsequent suffering. Last Thursday, CNBC premiered House of Cards, a solid two-hour documentary reported by correspondent David Faber.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 20, 1990
Though their subjects seem further apart than the continent that separates their locales, cultural conflicts are at the heart of both Nova and Frontline tonight, PBS' classy Tuesday night combination that delivers its usual potent punch.Nova, the science series that will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, at 8 o'clock, asks "Can the Elephant Be Saved?" while Frontline, following at 9 o'clock, has Bill Moyers in Massachusetts as "Springfield Goes to War" over the Gulf crisis.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 15, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- No one can accuse "Frontline" of not living up to PBS' mandate to be more timely.At 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), "Frontline" is scheduled to present "To the Brink of War," with Hodding Carter, a look at how America came to the midnight showdown only a few hours away.A rough cut of most of the show was made available for preview. "Frontline" Executive Producer David Fanning said the show will be flanked by live reports by Carter, a former State Department spokeman during Jimmy Carter's administration.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 14, 2008
No one on TV does political biography as skillfully as the producers of Frontline. And every four years since 1988, they have outdone themselves with The Choice, their political life histories of the presidential candidates. The arrival of the PBS program just weeks before the November election has become an event in its own right for followers of U.S. politics. And The Choice 2008: Two Journeys - One Destination, which airs at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), continues the tradition of excellence.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2008
BAGHDAD - Australian troops ended their main combat mission in Iraq yesterday, handing over their responsibilities in southern Iraq to U.S. forces. An estimated 550 Australian troops, who served in a training and backup role to Iraqi forces in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna, made the transfer in a ceremony at Camp Talil outside Nasiriya, said Capt. Chris Ford, a British military spokesman in southern Iraq. Meanwhile, U.S. officials announced that a bomb killed an American soldier yesterday in Baghdad.
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