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February 7, 2008
On February 5, 2008, JOYCE. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Friday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends at St. Vincent Depaul Roman Catholic Church, 120 N. Front Street on Saturday at 10:00 A.M. Funeral service will follow at 10:30 A.M. See www.marchfh.com
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore police are looking for witnesses in the beating of a wedding photographer near downtown. Eric Suydam remains at Maryland Shock Trauma after being robbed Saturday, said family friend Jim Sheckells. Suydam, 22, was working as a wedding photographer nearby, Sheckells said, when he went to his car to grab something and was beaten and robbed Police found him unconscious on the sidewalk in the area of Plowman and South Front streets at about 10 p.m. without any identification and labeled him a "John Doe. " A police report said he was bleeding from his mouth, nose and back of the head.
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BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
Ron and Laura Luna moved into their suburban dream house last month - a three-bedroom Colonial in Orange County, Calif., featuring walk-in closets, a spacious kitchen and a view of the Santa Ana Mountains. And a public restroom. That's a requirement along Front Street, where the houses are not just for living. They also are for making a living. The 22-home enclave in Ladera Ranch, a master-planned development east of Mission Viejo, is a tentative first step in a new suburban lifestyle: hybrid dwellings deep inside a residential neighborhood where people live in one part of the house and do business in another.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 21, 2013
A report from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers says Americans with tablets and smartphones spend as much time reading newspapers online as do those who still prefer the printed editions. The same is true for readers in Western Europe. The report estimates that, around the world, 2.5 billion adults read newspapers in print while more than 600 million people get their papers in digital form, and that number grows each year. Publishing has set sail for the digital universe, and one day the printed version of a newspaper, magazine or book may be strictly commemorative.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | October 20, 1991
From The Sun Oct. 20-26, 1841OCT. 21: Front Street -- We are glad to see that this street is being repaved in an improved and handsome style. It needed it very much.OCT. 26: President Tyler -- We are happy to inform the public that the rumor of an attempt to assassinate the President, mentioned by us yesterday morning, received no confirmation through the whole of yesterday.From The Sun Oct. 20-26, 1891OCT. 20: By a collision shortly before noon yesterday, at Sherwood, on the Northern Central Railway, between a freight train and a repair train, a locomotive was wrecked and a box car smashed to bits.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | May 5, 1996
From The Sun May 5-11, 1846May 5: We understand that two carriages were broken on Sunday, in the vicinity of Govanstown, by the horses running away.May 9: Vice President Dallas arrived in town yesterday evening from Washington, on his way to Philadelphia, and put up at the City Hotel.May 11: On Saturday evening a gas pipe in a store in East Baltimore Street, a few doors east of Front Street, exploded and tore away a considerable portion of the ceiling.From The Sun May 5-11, 1896May 5: The new Druid Hill Park sea lions are ready to receive callers.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 21, 2013
A report from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers says Americans with tablets and smartphones spend as much time reading newspapers online as do those who still prefer the printed editions. The same is true for readers in Western Europe. The report estimates that, around the world, 2.5 billion adults read newspapers in print while more than 600 million people get their papers in digital form, and that number grows each year. Publishing has set sail for the digital universe, and one day the printed version of a newspaper, magazine or book may be strictly commemorative.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore police are looking for witnesses in the beating of a wedding photographer near downtown. Eric Suydam remains at Maryland Shock Trauma after being robbed Saturday, said family friend Jim Sheckells. Suydam, 22, was working as a wedding photographer nearby, Sheckells said, when he went to his car to grab something and was beaten and robbed Police found him unconscious on the sidewalk in the area of Plowman and South Front streets at about 10 p.m. without any identification and labeled him a "John Doe. " A police report said he was bleeding from his mouth, nose and back of the head.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Under a hillside of thistle and milkweed secluded within Northeast Baltimore's Clifton Park rests an unmarked neighborhood of the dead. Hidden from view and overtaken by nature, the mid-19th-century St. Vincent DePaul Church Cemetery is the burial ground for some 2,000 Baltimoreans. But only a few broken limestone markers remain. The descendants of the Irish, German and Italian families buried here, using Internet message boards, are joining forces to bring recognition to the graveyard troubled by criminal, financial and maintenance issues for the past 65 years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Under a hillside of thistle and milkweed secluded within Northeast Baltimore's Clifton Park rests an unmarked neighborhood of the dead. Hidden from view and overtaken by nature, the mid-19th-century St. Vincent DePaul Church Cemetery is the burial ground for some 2,000 Baltimoreans. But only a few broken limestone markers remain. The descendants of the Irish, German and Italian families buried here, using Internet message boards, are joining forces to bring recognition to the graveyard troubled by criminal, financial and maintenance issues for the past 65 years.
NEWS
February 7, 2008
On February 5, 2008, JOYCE. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Friday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends at St. Vincent Depaul Roman Catholic Church, 120 N. Front Street on Saturday at 10:00 A.M. Funeral service will follow at 10:30 A.M. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
In Baltimore, where a downtown hotel stay easily costs $200 a night, a developer has ambitious plans that would bring three alternatives to the budget-conscious traveler. Sanket Patel, an Annapolis-based developer, plans to build side-by-side hotels, a $35 million project, on Front Street near the base of the Jones Falls Expressway. One would be a 63-room Sleep Inn to be built in the old Furncraft building. He would demolish the former Hillen Tire shop next door to build an 11-story Cambria Suites.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
Ron and Laura Luna moved into their suburban dream house last month - a three-bedroom Colonial in Orange County, Calif., featuring walk-in closets, a spacious kitchen and a view of the Santa Ana Mountains. And a public restroom. That's a requirement along Front Street, where the houses are not just for living. They also are for making a living. The 22-home enclave in Ladera Ranch, a master-planned development east of Mission Viejo, is a tentative first step in a new suburban lifestyle: hybrid dwellings deep inside a residential neighborhood where people live in one part of the house and do business in another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | April 22, 2001
Can a building completed in 1996 be a city landmark? It can if its exterior bears the reconstructed cast-iron facade from the old G. Fava Fruit Co. Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted this month to bestow landmark status on the Fava building and several other structures at 33 S. Front St., near the historic Carroll Mansion. The vote marks the first time that the preservation commission has agreed to add such a recently finished building to its landmark list, and it provides a measure of protection for the exterior by requiring that any plans for alterations be reviewed and approved by the city panel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | April 22, 2001
Can a building completed in 1996 be a city landmark? It can if its exterior bears the reconstructed cast-iron facade from the old G. Fava Fruit Co. Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted this month to bestow landmark status on the Fava building and several other structures at 33 S. Front St., near the historic Carroll Mansion. The vote marks the first time that the preservation commission has agreed to add such a recently finished building to its landmark list, and it provides a measure of protection for the exterior by requiring that any plans for alterations be reviewed and approved by the city panel.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
In Baltimore, where a downtown hotel stay easily costs $200 a night, a developer has ambitious plans that would bring three alternatives to the budget-conscious traveler. Sanket Patel, an Annapolis-based developer, plans to build side-by-side hotels, a $35 million project, on Front Street near the base of the Jones Falls Expressway. One would be a 63-room Sleep Inn to be built in the old Furncraft building. He would demolish the former Hillen Tire shop next door to build an 11-story Cambria Suites.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
The owner of a burned Annapolis building may not demolish the historic facade yet, an Anne Arundel County circuit judge ruled yesterday, but the judge also recommended that city officials decide quickly whether the charred brick ruins ought to be saved.The injunction by Judge James C. Cawood Jr. delighted the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The nonprofit group sued to prevent Ronald B. Hollander from razing what is left of his 1899 building in the historic district before an evaluation and without approval from the Historic Preservation Commission.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | May 5, 1996
From The Sun May 5-11, 1846May 5: We understand that two carriages were broken on Sunday, in the vicinity of Govanstown, by the horses running away.May 9: Vice President Dallas arrived in town yesterday evening from Washington, on his way to Philadelphia, and put up at the City Hotel.May 11: On Saturday evening a gas pipe in a store in East Baltimore Street, a few doors east of Front Street, exploded and tore away a considerable portion of the ceiling.From The Sun May 5-11, 1896May 5: The new Druid Hill Park sea lions are ready to receive callers.
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