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NEWS
June 8, 1993
City man dies from accident injuriesBALTIMORE -- A northwest city man died last night at Johns Hopkins Hospital from injuries received on May 30 when he was struck by a car while attempting to cross a West Baltimore intersection.Officer Tony Petralia of the traffic investigation section said Herbert Charles Hodge, 49, of the 5300 block of Belleville Ave., was attempting to cross the 2100 block of Mulberry St. near North Smallwood Street at 9:30 p.m. when he stepped into the path of an eastbound 1985 Pontiac driven by Duane Cornell Hedgepeth, 30, of the 600 block of N. Bentalou St.Officer Petralia said the impact drove Mr. Hodge onto the roof of the car before he fell to the pavement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Marianne Fishman's three-story townhouse in Butchers Hill is a reflection of her life's work as an interior designer while also giving credence to Row House Interiors, the design company she owns. "When we bought the house, it was a total disaster," she recalled. "But we got it well under the market price. " She and her husband, Larry Fishman, 55, president of All-State Career School in South Baltimore, settled on their East Baltimore home in April 2006. By October of that year, they were able to move in, thanks to the work of the many contractors she uses in her business.
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BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2009
When children grow up and leave home, many parents decide to do the same. For empty-nesters Laurie and Robert Weitz, the decision to start over has been a positive one. The self-employed couple, ready for a change from suburban Lutherville, headed south toward Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where they found Federal Place, a development of 26 five-story brick townhouses overlooking Key Highway. "We wanted to downsize [and] enjoy a city lifestyle," said 54-year-old Laurie Weitz. "We wanted to be able to walk to restaurants and the stadium."
ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | December 18, 2013
MICA graduate Haggag, 26, was named director of the Contemporary Museum this year. Exhibits are listed in reverse chronological order.  Seth Adelsberger, "Surface Treatment," Springsteen Gallery, Nov. 22-Jan. 10, 2014 Springsteen Gallery isn't even a year old and they've already left one hell of a mark on our arts scene. Seth Adelsberger's exhibition is sharp and a wanton change towards process that I very much enjoyed. I am looking forward to his solo exhibition opening June 2014 at the Baltimore Museum of Art and encourage everyone to catch his work at Springsteen while you can. Also, someone please, please, please buy me an Adelsberger for Christmas.  Multiple Artists, "Paint it Black, Guest Spot," Nov. 9-Jan.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
They could have moved anywhere they wanted when the time came to leave the big old house that faces Patterson Park.Guilford.Severna Park.A luxury condominium at the Inner Harbor.Anywhere.But Ed and Eleanor Rybczynski moved two doors away.They say they decided more with their hearts than their heads -- choosing to keep their view of the Patterson Park pagoda that Mr. Rybczynski fought to save in the early 1960s; to remain in walking distance of Holy Rosary Church where they were married in 1954 and all 10 of their children were baptized; to stay put in the old waterfront neighborhood where their Polish-American roots go back to the turn of the century.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Two people were killed early yesterday in a fire at an East Baltimore corner grocery store. Firefighters responded to the report of a fire in the 2400 block of Jefferson St. at 12:30 a.m., said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. They found heavy fire and smoke at the two-story brick store, which has an apartment above it. When they searched the building, they found a man and woman who were unconscious and not breathing in the front room on the second floor, Cartwright said.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | November 15, 1992
A 97-year-old Govans man was killed early yesterday after his sweater caught on fire while he was trying to light one of the cigars that had been his trademark for decades.Fire officials said John Williams, who had lived at least half his life in a modest brick cottage style home in the 5000 block of Midwood Ave., was pronounced dead at the scene."He always had that cigar in his mouth," said Elizabeth C. Tiller, who had lived next door to Mr. Williams for the past 35 years. "Whether it was burning or not, he always carried one in his mouth."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1997
A gunman invaded the Anneslie home of a bank manager yesterday and forced his wife, who is more than eight months pregnant with her first child, to telephone a $50,000 ransom demand to him at the bank. The extortion attempt failed, however.It was the second incident in two weeks of a bank employee's family being threatened for ransom. On Feb. 21, two children of a NationsBank teller were abducted for ransom in Pimlico.Yesterday, a man posing as a flower deliveryman knocked on the door of the home of Scott and Sheila Ann Gomsak in the 500 block of Regester Ave., police said.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1995
Can a house have a spirit? Can concrete, brown shingles, bad wall paneling, and green, knee-deep carpet all possess a soul?In Fells Point, a storefront is wedged in between the Painters Union and the Electrology Center. In a strip of stores that include the Love Zone, Karmic Connection and body hair removal, this storefront at 520 S. Broadway is a curious exception. For now, it's a war memorial. But it has been so much more.Knock, knock."Can we help you?" answers a barefoot, tanned woman with red toenail polish lighting up the green carpet.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | January 4, 1992
Baltimore homicide and arson detectives were still uncertain last night of what prompted someone to hurl a Molotov cocktail through the window of an East Baltimore row house early yesterday, turning the home into an inferno that killed two children.Police have no suspects in the early morning blaze, which also left a man critically injured after he fell or jumped from a third-floor window of the Federal Street house."At this point we could say the motive is anything from drugs to domestic violence.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
A multicolored grouping of four clapboard rowhouses in Fells Point stands out like Gerbera daisies against the Formstone and brick fronts of its neighbors on either side. Architect Myrna Poirier calls one of these gems home and will soon invite visitors beyond her threshold as part of the Historic Harbor House Tour of Fells Point on Mother's Day. In keeping with the facade of her home, the interior is a color-infused, uplifting space. "Color is so important," she said. "A lot of people don't realize what color does for your spirits," pointing to an open interior 50 feet deep, with soft pastel paint on the walls in each room, richly embellished textiles from all over the world hanging on them and the morning sun bursting through ceiling skylights.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2009
When children grow up and leave home, many parents decide to do the same. For empty-nesters Laurie and Robert Weitz, the decision to start over has been a positive one. The self-employed couple, ready for a change from suburban Lutherville, headed south toward Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where they found Federal Place, a development of 26 five-story brick townhouses overlooking Key Highway. "We wanted to downsize [and] enjoy a city lifestyle," said 54-year-old Laurie Weitz. "We wanted to be able to walk to restaurants and the stadium."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Two people were killed early yesterday in a fire at an East Baltimore corner grocery store. Firefighters responded to the report of a fire in the 2400 block of Jefferson St. at 12:30 a.m., said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. They found heavy fire and smoke at the two-story brick store, which has an apartment above it. When they searched the building, they found a man and woman who were unconscious and not breathing in the front room on the second floor, Cartwright said.
NEWS
By Madeleine Mysko and Madeleine Mysko,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2007
In the months before he died, Al made one wish very clear: We were to do nothing by way of memorializing, not even an obituary. He said he'd come back from the other side to hold us accountable if we did. Al believed in the permeability of the wall separating the living from the dead, so we knew he wasn't joking. When I got the news that Al was gone, I coped creatively. I made a private shrine in the dining room -- cleared the top of the plant stand, laid down a doily, and set out the gift Al presented to me when I got married recently (somewhat late in life, and for the second time)
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 14, 2006
Spring may be the best time of year to visit the Milton Inn, Baltimore's favorite destination restaurant. The front dining room of the mid-18th-century fieldstone house has large windows on two sides and is filled with light as the sun sets. The apple-green walls and handsome period furnishings of this pretty room look their best this time of year. Its well-spaced tables beckon, set with white linen, sparkling stemware and fresh flowers. The effect is fresh and appealing. So why does the hostess walk us past this lovely, mostly empty room and try to seat us in the back dining room, which is windowless, so dark someone at the table next to us has borrowed our candle to read his menu, and crammed full of other diners?
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition. For 86 years at this tan rowhouse on a residential Fells Point street, a family named Ostrowksi has practiced carnivorous magic, making homemade sausages that people return for again and again. For 86 years, it's been one Ostrowski or another grinding, seasoning and hand-shaping that meat, working to the dictates of time-tested recipes.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2003
Mornings are colorful occasions for Rick Chaney and Amy Winter. The sun rises above grassy knolls just across from their front door. It shines through branches of leafy trees and makes its way through the stained-glass transoms above their door and window. It is then that a kaleidoscope of color bounces off the ceiling and walls of their front room. Evenings are a bit of a show, too. The setting sun, enjoyed from a rooftop patio, casts yellow and orange hues over neighboring homes beyond their yard.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition. For 86 years at this tan rowhouse on a residential Fells Point street, a family named Ostrowksi has practiced carnivorous magic, making homemade sausages that people return for again and again. For 86 years, it's been one Ostrowski or another grinding, seasoning and hand-shaping that meat, working to the dictates of time-tested recipes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 27, 2003
JACK BROTHERS stood in the gutted kitchen of his house on Galloway Creek the other day and pointed down a hallway to the big windows in an empty, cedar-paneled front room. The windows offered a pleasant view of a lawn shaded by a sprawling magnolia tree and, beyond that, the flat, green-gray water that leads to the Chesapeake Bay. Any other holiday week of the last 27 years, Jack would be sitting in his front room, admiring his little piece of Baltimore County waterfront, thankful for all the sunrises and sunsets on Galloway Creek.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2003
Mornings are colorful occasions for Rick Chaney and Amy Winter. The sun rises above grassy knolls just across from their front door. It shines through branches of leafy trees and makes its way through the stained-glass transoms above their door and window. It is then that a kaleidoscope of color bounces off the ceiling and walls of their front room. Evenings are a bit of a show, too. The setting sun, enjoyed from a rooftop patio, casts yellow and orange hues over neighboring homes beyond their yard.
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