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NEWS
January 21, 2013
With serious fiscal issues facing the nation and a governor who is contemplating repealing the death penalty, among other things, it's remarkable that The Sun chose to devote a third of its front page to a story about a video of an enthusiastic Ravens fan that went viral on YouTube ("Bel Air resident's freakout over the Ravens is a hit on YouTube," Jan. 16). Perhaps this would have been an appropriate fit in the sports or entertainment sections, but on the front page? No wonder we have such a proliferation of low-information voters.
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NEWS
January 21, 2013
With serious fiscal issues facing the nation and a governor who is contemplating repealing the death penalty, among other things, it's remarkable that The Sun chose to devote a third of its front page to a story about a video of an enthusiastic Ravens fan that went viral on YouTube ("Bel Air resident's freakout over the Ravens is a hit on YouTube," Jan. 16). Perhaps this would have been an appropriate fit in the sports or entertainment sections, but on the front page? No wonder we have such a proliferation of low-information voters.
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NEWS
June 8, 2011
Today's story on the problems of New York Rep. Anthony Weiner ("Emotional Weiner admits he sent suggestive photo," June 7) only appeared on page 7 in today's Sun. Yet if Representative Weiner were a Republican, this would be front-page news for two weeks. You might even print a special edition. Jerry Schmechel
NEWS
March 29, 2012
The Sun's article about Trayvon Martin ("'We are Trayvon,' marchers proclaim," March 27) reflects The Sun's liberal bias. That article had the largest font of any page-one heading, making it the most prominent front-page article. Buried on page eight was an article that addresses the facts of the incident that resulted in Trayvon Martin's death ("Witnesses back Fla. Shooter's account of attack, police say," March 27). The page one article states that "Trayvon was shot by [George]
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Why is Bernard Young being glorified and exalted for doing the right thing ("Young pledges that he'll pay for his playoff seats in Lewis' skybox," Jan. 19)? He's supposed to do the right thing! Have we reached a point where our moral conduct is so dreadful, our ethics so abysmal that a city council president promising to obey the law makes front-page news? God help us. Katherine Ambrose, Kingsville
NEWS
September 28, 2011
I looked at The Sun on Sunday and was a tad confused. "What happened to the front page news?" I asked myself. After getting over my confusion, I realized that The Sun had sold a four-page ad to Wells Fargo (sounds like highway robbery to me), and that the news was buried somewhere inside the ad (isn't it supposed to be the other way around?). Look, I don't begrudge The Sun for needing ad revenues. I even wouldn't have minded a four-page ad spread inside the newspaper. But what came Sunday was not a newspaper but an advertising supplement for the latest, greatest bank in town.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
The sex lives of American presidents, all the way back to Thomas Jefferson, were not front-page news, as they would be today. The private lives of presidents and other public officials made for gossip among Washington insiders but were not considered the general public's business. And when — and if — America ever gets over its schizophrenic attitude toward sex and the human body, things like the current Anthony Weiner scandal will be non-stories. I had a chat, years ago, with an acquaintance of mine who worked with politicos in D.C., and she observed that some of the most idealistic, talented and otherwise decent politicians are also philanderers.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
The Sun's article about Trayvon Martin ("'We are Trayvon,' marchers proclaim," March 27) reflects The Sun's liberal bias. That article had the largest font of any page-one heading, making it the most prominent front-page article. Buried on page eight was an article that addresses the facts of the incident that resulted in Trayvon Martin's death ("Witnesses back Fla. Shooter's account of attack, police say," March 27). The page one article states that "Trayvon was shot by [George]
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
From the pages of the Havre de Grace Record dated Thursday morning, July 20, 1961: The long-running Chief J. Earl Walker era in the Havre de Grace Police Department began 50 years ago this week. Chief Walker, as he was known to generations, was appointed by Mayor James Vancherie and confirmed by the Havre de Grace City Council, settling a tumultuous time in the city that began in early May with Vancherie's election as mayor. In other front page news, Mayor Vancherie appointed a five-person committee of G. Arnold Paffenbach, William P. Dietz, Louis H. Miller, Kathryn Asher and Charles M. Moore to begin planning for the city to honor the late Sen. Millard E. Tydings by renaming the City Park to Tydings Memorial Park and a statue of the man Vancherie called a "war hero and a statesman.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | September 10, 2007
Susan "Suzie" Parthemos, who with her family owned a popular Irvington restaurant, died Friday of a heart ailment at St. Agnes Hospital. The Charlestown retirement community resident was 77. She, her husband, James Parthemos, and her parents, Lillian and Sam Malas, opened Duffy's restaurant in 1954. Later, she and her husband took it over before selling it in 1999. It was known for seafood dishes - she negotiated prices early in the morning with watermen - as well as large dinners at reasonable prices, a homemade green goddess dressing and a congenial atmosphere.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Why is Bernard Young being glorified and exalted for doing the right thing ("Young pledges that he'll pay for his playoff seats in Lewis' skybox," Jan. 19)? He's supposed to do the right thing! Have we reached a point where our moral conduct is so dreadful, our ethics so abysmal that a city council president promising to obey the law makes front-page news? God help us. Katherine Ambrose, Kingsville
NEWS
September 28, 2011
I looked at The Sun on Sunday and was a tad confused. "What happened to the front page news?" I asked myself. After getting over my confusion, I realized that The Sun had sold a four-page ad to Wells Fargo (sounds like highway robbery to me), and that the news was buried somewhere inside the ad (isn't it supposed to be the other way around?). Look, I don't begrudge The Sun for needing ad revenues. I even wouldn't have minded a four-page ad spread inside the newspaper. But what came Sunday was not a newspaper but an advertising supplement for the latest, greatest bank in town.
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
From the pages of the Havre de Grace Record dated Thursday morning, July 20, 1961: The long-running Chief J. Earl Walker era in the Havre de Grace Police Department began 50 years ago this week. Chief Walker, as he was known to generations, was appointed by Mayor James Vancherie and confirmed by the Havre de Grace City Council, settling a tumultuous time in the city that began in early May with Vancherie's election as mayor. In other front page news, Mayor Vancherie appointed a five-person committee of G. Arnold Paffenbach, William P. Dietz, Louis H. Miller, Kathryn Asher and Charles M. Moore to begin planning for the city to honor the late Sen. Millard E. Tydings by renaming the City Park to Tydings Memorial Park and a statue of the man Vancherie called a "war hero and a statesman.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
The sex lives of American presidents, all the way back to Thomas Jefferson, were not front-page news, as they would be today. The private lives of presidents and other public officials made for gossip among Washington insiders but were not considered the general public's business. And when — and if — America ever gets over its schizophrenic attitude toward sex and the human body, things like the current Anthony Weiner scandal will be non-stories. I had a chat, years ago, with an acquaintance of mine who worked with politicos in D.C., and she observed that some of the most idealistic, talented and otherwise decent politicians are also philanderers.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Today's story on the problems of New York Rep. Anthony Weiner ("Emotional Weiner admits he sent suggestive photo," June 7) only appeared on page 7 in today's Sun. Yet if Representative Weiner were a Republican, this would be front-page news for two weeks. You might even print a special edition. Jerry Schmechel
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | September 10, 2007
Susan "Suzie" Parthemos, who with her family owned a popular Irvington restaurant, died Friday of a heart ailment at St. Agnes Hospital. The Charlestown retirement community resident was 77. She, her husband, James Parthemos, and her parents, Lillian and Sam Malas, opened Duffy's restaurant in 1954. Later, she and her husband took it over before selling it in 1999. It was known for seafood dishes - she negotiated prices early in the morning with watermen - as well as large dinners at reasonable prices, a homemade green goddess dressing and a congenial atmosphere.
FEATURES
December 30, 1990
The arts were often front-page news during 1990 as the debate over censorship and freedom of expression found its way into the spotlight. But that's not all that drew attention during the last 12 months. Here's what our critics like to remember about the past year -- and some things they'd rather forget.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1998
Before him lay Siamese twins, their brains joined by an elaborate network of blood vessels. The myriad folds and planes came into view.He saw where the brains divided. He studied the features from every conceivable angle. He memorized the terrain. He planned his moves.This was Dr. Benjamin Carson's rehearsal -- done in the eerie space of virtual reality.Today, the Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon is celebrating that two 11-month-old boys are recovering splendidly -- and separately -- in the South African hospital where he and more than 20 doctors and nurses performed an exhausting operation that lasted more than a day."
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