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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
The body of a man found yesterday morning on the front lawn of a Glen Burnie home apparently was the victim of a hit-and-run accident, the state Medical Examiner's office has ruled.Anne Arundel County police said a preliminary report indicates that Paul LeRoy Seipp Jr., 33, died as a result of head injuries, most likely as a result of being hit by a car.Lt. Mike McNelly, who is heading the investigation, said police do not have any witnesses and are asking the public for help. Mr. Seipp lived in the 600 block of 209th St. in Pasadena.
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FEATURES
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
Clarence Ridgley points out to a neighbor the herb patch, the baby broccoli plants surrounded by onions and his mini-orchard. Nothing unusual. These are staples of a backyard garden. But this is a front yard in Baltimore. Drivers slow to stare. All the sturdy single-family houses from the 1920s and 1930s on this city street west of Druid Hill Park line up behind their green lawns. Except, now, Clarence and Rudine Ridgley's red brick and clapboard home is behind fruit trees, tomato cages, berry bushes and vegetables.
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NEWS
January 29, 1993
* Clarksville: 7300 block of Minter Lane: Someone drove a vehicle across a front lawn for about 220 feet between 7:30 p.m. Friday and 6:30 a.m. Saturday.* Glenelg: 14000 block of Burnt Woods Road: Someone smashed a window pane at Glenelg High School sometime before Sunday.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 25, 2004
Baltimore's Inner Harbor has been described as the city's living room. Soon it will have a front lawn as well if city voters approve a $30 million bond issue that would include $2 million to create a "world class" park on the harbor's west shore. Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel, formerly known as the Design Advisory Panel, last week approved preliminary plans for creating a public park on a 2.5 acre parcel along Light Street, between the Maryland Science Center and the Baltimore Visitors Center.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | January 2, 1993
Harry Zellman was spending a quiet New Year's Eve at his fiancee's home in Essex when a terrified and bloodied neighbor ran up to the house, screaming that her husband had just stabbed her in the neck.It was the beginning of a night of violence that left Mr. Zellman and two others dead, and the woman seriously wounded.Hoping he could defuse the situation, Mr. Zellman, 46, walked toward the woman's home in the first block of Kingston Park Lane West. As he approached, the woman's husband fatally shot him in the chest with a shotgun, police said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
A blue elephant is rearing its head in Roland Park. It's standing on the lawn of a country cottage home on Hawthorne Road - a 12-foot-high plate steel sculpture made by a local artist who's using the staid, tree-covered Roland Park environs as the backdrop for his outdoor metal menagerie. Bradford McDougall, himself a Roland Park homeowner, is forging a series of giant animal sculptures based on the drawings of his 4-year-old daughter, Olivia. There's not only the blue elephant, but an enormous orange barking dog that for a while sat in the front yard of his Oakdale Road house.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
Wesley Swope woke up Friday morning with his 15-year-old daughter, Heather, screaming that a car had driven into a neighbor's house.He didn't think it was true until he got out of bed to take a look himself. "Believe it or not, the car was right in the living room," he said. "I couldn't believe that car could slam into a house like that."The strange accident occurred 15 minutes past midnight, when a Honda Prelude driven by a man charged with drunken driving lost controland slid sideways into the living room of a home in the 4400 block of Mountain Road in the Lake Shore area of Pasadena.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
As he drives through the Remington community near Druid Hill Park, Anthony Armstrong sees a wave of red and white banners. To the man responsible for plastering campaign signs for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke all over town, this is not pretty.The red and white signs tout Mary Pat Clarke's candidacy for mayor in Tuesday's primary election. Nowhere in sight are the familiar red, black and green placards of Mr. Schmoke's campaign."We want to make a dent in this community," Mr. Armstrong says from the wheel of his four-wheel drive vehicle.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,Contributing Writer | March 11, 1993
Demetra Goldman is finding chunks of lead paint everywhere these days -- by the lilac bush, on the edge of the back lawn, all over the front lawn of her Glyndon home.And until something is done about the paint falling from the fenced-in water tower a few yards from her house, she will not let her four young grandchildren play in her yard."They told me not to pick these up without gloves because they are lead," Mrs. Goldman said, pointing to a fist-sized shard on her front lawn on First Avenue.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2001
Dear Mr. Azrael: On July 9, 1999, I settled on a new $295,000 home in Forest Hill. One week before settlement, the builder was aware of water in the basement. The main problem is water leaking in three distinct sections of the house since settlement. Each time it rains, we set out buckets to gather the water. I have twice drilled holes in the ceiling to relieve the pressure. The builder has been very apologetic. The roof was replaced in June 2000. It still leaks in the first floor master bedroom, bath and family room.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Howard County police are investigating a possible hate crime after the shape of a cross was formed on the grass of a top education official who was recently cleared of allegations she abused her power by seeking preferential treatment for her daughter. Howard police and the county chapter of the NAACP denounced yesterday the vandalism at the Ellicott City home of Kimberly Statham at a news conference at police headquarters. Police also offered a $2,500 reward for information leading to an arrest and indictment.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 27, 2003
After 18 years, Sue and Richard Hillis are realists about their 150-year-old Victorian home in the Lutherville historic district. "These houses are a labor of love-slash-money pit," Richard, a civil engineer, says with a grin. Sue Hillis, now 53, had no idea what she was getting herself into when the couple bought the house. She was eight months pregnant with their first child, and she had been brought up in a small Canton rowhouse. "Rich always wanted to have a 'painted lady,' " she says, referring to the colorful exterior of a period Victorian home; but she was wary of an old six-bedroom house that needed lots of fixing up. She needn't have worried.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
A blue elephant is rearing its head in Roland Park. It's standing on the lawn of a country cottage home on Hawthorne Road - a 12-foot-high plate steel sculpture made by a local artist who's using the staid, tree-covered Roland Park environs as the backdrop for his outdoor metal menagerie. Bradford McDougall, himself a Roland Park homeowner, is forging a series of giant animal sculptures based on the drawings of his 4-year-old daughter, Olivia. There's not only the blue elephant, but an enormous orange barking dog that for a while sat in the front yard of his Oakdale Road house.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 13, 2002
AS SOON AS his wife and daughter had left for The Nutcracker, downtown at the Mechanic Theatre, Rene Florendo grabbed an aluminum extension ladder, several 50-foot strings of Christmas lights and a neighbor named Brian Sabo. It was Saturday afternoon, Dec. 9, 2001. The mission: Decorate that big, old pine tree on the front lawn, the one as tall as Florendo's house. In previous years, Rene Florendo had settled for lighting up the shrubs. But the pine, a burly evergreen that had been spared pruning for years, blocked the view of his decorations from the street.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
ASHBURN, Va. - For 12 years, Dave Szott has looked forward to suiting up on Sundays in the fall and getting into the trenches with the rest of his offensive line mates to get down and dirty. But, as the NFL is taking its first regular-season Sunday off for reasons other than labor disputes, Szott, the Washington Redskins' starting right guard, will look forward to some down time to reflect on what has been a tumultuous week for himself and his family. In addition to watching the destruction of the World Trade Center from his Morristown, N.J., home Tuesday, Szott spent two hours panicking over the temporary disappearance of his brother, Kevin, an insurance broker who worked in Building 5 of the World Trade Center.
NEWS
By Jim Quinn and Jim Quinn,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 29, 2001
Chris Heiska has a dirty little secret. It proves that she is, indeed, the Yard Sale Queen. "I did something very cheap at my last yard sale," she said. She was about ready to have a sale, but she didn't really want to go to the expense of buying a classified ad to promote it. "I waited until someone else in my neighborhood placed an ad in the paper, then held my own yard sale the same day. I just put up my own signs in the neighborhood so the people going to the first yard sale came to mine as well," said Heiska, who lives in Southern Maryland.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,Contributing Writer | March 12, 1993
Demetra Goldman is finding chunks of lead paint everywhere -- by the lilac bush, on the edge of the back lawn, all over the front lawn of her Glyndon home.And until something is done about the paint falling from the fenced-in water tower a few yards from her house, she will not let her four grandchildren play in her yard."They told me not to pick these up without gloves because they are lead," Mrs. Goldman said, pointing to a fist-sized shard on her front lawn on First Avenue. "I am worried.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
St. John's College officials will wait to decide the fate of Maryland's ailing Liberty Tree early next week, after a state-commissioned arborist says whether the 96-foot tulip poplar can be saved.The 400-year-old tree on St. John's front lawn -- the only survivor of the original 13 under which colonists gathered in the 1770s to incite revolt against British rule -- took a beating last week from Hurricane Floyd.In the aftermath of last week's storm, officials of the Annapolis college discovered a 15-foot-long crack down the middle of the tree's trunk and a large branch breaking away toward a nearby dormitory.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2001
Dear Mr. Azrael: On July 9, 1999, I settled on a new $295,000 home in Forest Hill. One week before settlement, the builder was aware of water in the basement. The main problem is water leaking in three distinct sections of the house since settlement. Each time it rains, we set out buckets to gather the water. I have twice drilled holes in the ceiling to relieve the pressure. The builder has been very apologetic. The roof was replaced in June 2000. It still leaks in the first floor master bedroom, bath and family room.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE On Maine's wild side Andrea J. Keller, SPECIAL TO THE SUN Washington County, Maine, is a place still wild. We vacationed there for a week: two people, two oversized dogs and a pile of camping gear crammed into a 10-year-old truck. Along the way, we stopped for quartz at an abandoned quarry, toured a microbrewery, photographed the roadside wildflowers and wildlife (moose!), and ate at the lunch counter at the Amherst General Store (the sandwiches and the staff are memorable)
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