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August 7, 2013
I would like to thank the generous lady at the Laurel Regional Hospital. On Saturday, June 29, my daughter was in the hospital and desperately wanted to watch television. The cafeteria and gift shop were closed and I needed exact change ($8) to insert in the machine to get a card for TV in the room. I was at the front desk asking everyone if they had change. A visitor gave me $8 and I gave her a $20 bill. While I was inserting the money in the machine she slipped the $20 in my bag. She was too generous and I don't know how to thank her. Betty Frizzell Laurel
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NEWS
July 12, 2003
John Henry Musterman III, a telephone lines supervisor, died of heart failure July 5 at Ruxton Manor Care. The Timonium resident was 93. Born in Annapolis, he was a 1928 graduate of Annapolis High School and earned a diploma at the Bliss Electrical School in Washington. He joined AT&T in Baltimore about 60 years ago and became a supervisor. He remained there 40 years. He then ran the front desk at Easter's Lock and Key Service until about 10 years ago. He was a member of the Telephone Pioneers of Maryland and Ascension Lutheran Church.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 9, 2001
A bearded man with a shotgun robbed the Holiday Inn on Washington Boulevard in Jessup of an undisclosed amount of cash yesterday morning, Howard County police said. Police said the robber - a black man in his late 20s to early 30s, 5-feet-6 to 5-feet-8 and 140 to 160 pounds - was wearing a dark jacket, blue jeans and a bandana over his head. He asked the front-desk employee for change and when the employee opened the cash drawer, the man pulled a shotgun and demanded all of the money, police said.
NEWS
August 3, 1993
Columbia Association honors workersThe Columbia Association has recognized the following employees for outstanding service:* Anne Cerfoy, program director, Before and After School Care;* Eric Colbert, heavy equipment operator, Open Space;* Bill Foley, head guard and instructor, Columbia Swim Center;* Nancy Kolb, front desk staff member, Columbia Athletic Club; and* Ted Nathurin, instructor, Supreme Sports Club.POLICE LOG* Town Center: Someone stole a horn, a JVC AM-FM stereo and $4 in change from a 1986 Nissan 200-SX between 8 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
April 26, 2005
Luril D. Greene-Curtis, a hotel worker, died of a heart attack Thursday at Maryland General Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 38. Born Luril D. Greene in Baltimore, she was raised on East Preston Street. After graduating in 1984 from the Institute of Notre Dame, she took at job with the FBI in Washington. In 1993, she became a hotel concierge at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore. She later held a job in human resources at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel and since last year had been working the front desk at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. Mrs. Greene-Curtis enjoyed dancing, cooking and entertaining.
NEWS
By Jean Block Bessmer | June 11, 1998
LAST Saturday night in Baltimore I slept with a couple I'd never met before. Well, it's a long story that came about because of the shortage of hotel rooms in the area.I had arrived in the city early in the evening to enjoy dinner with friends. Before we knew it time had flown. It was 3 a.m. -- too late for me to drive back to Rockville alone. So I began calling local hotels, searching for a room for the night.It quickly became clear to me that I would not find a room -- even the Hunt Valley Inn, 18 miles from downtown, didn't have a room.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
When the Playboy Club in Baltimore opened in 1964, it quickly carved a niche for itself in the city. Like its counterparts across the nation, the local franchise prided itself on being upscale and professional, former Playboy Bunnies who worked there said. More than 100 former Bunnies, who worked in clubs internationally from the '60s to the '80s, converged on Baltimore to share stories of the bygone businesses this weekend at their semiannual reunion. Several who worked in Baltimore's club said its appeal was much the same as the magazine's - they were mysterious and provocative.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
HOUSTON -- You expect to find some high-tech laboratory with hundreds of leotard-clad clones running around. Lithe little Nadias doing their flips and tumbles in one corner, muscular little Mary Lous doing their vaults in another. You expect to see this great bear of a man -- and certainly hear his booming voice -- the moment you walk in the door.But Bela Karolyi's gym is different from what you expect, mostly because it looks pretty much the same as hundreds of other neighborhood gyms across the country.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
HAGERSTOWN -- Inside the Hagerstown Rescue Mission, up the stairs, into the dormitory, next to a bed with a thin tan coverlet, atop a dark locker -- this is where Donnie Green keeps his memorabilia. He has three tiny plastic helmets, one for each of the National Football League teams he played on: the Buffalo Bills, the Philadelphia Eagles, the Detroit Lions. Behind those -- he has to groan and stretch to reach it -- is a blue, loose-leaf binder filled with photographs and articles. He turns the pages matter of factly, betraying little.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
Just a few months after her husband drowned their three children, Amy Castillo found herself standing on top of a mountain during a Christian missionary trip to China, winds whipping, rain pouring down. She asked herself a question: "Can I live with this?" A long time passed before she could honestly answer. The man she once playfully called "sexy thing," who swept her off her feet and quickly became her best friend, had gradually vanished over the past five years. In his place was a manic, suicidal stranger who spent entire nights at Baltimore strip clubs, blew thousands of dollars in wild shopping sprees and accused her of being self-righteous and manipulative.
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