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NEWS
March 1, 2009
The Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road, will offer Thirst 'n' Howl Musical Productions' Rosie The Riveter, an original revue honoring the women of the 1940s who supported the home front during World War II, at 1 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free. "Heart Health for Women," a free program presented by Marilyn Smedberg-Gobbett, volunteer coordinator with the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, will be presented at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. She will discuss prevention, early detection, diagnosis and proper treatment.
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NEWS
By Jean Block Bessmer | June 11, 1998
LAST Saturday night in Baltimore I slept with a couple I'd never met before. Well, it's a long story that came about because of the shortage of hotel rooms in the area.I had arrived in the city early in the evening to enjoy dinner with friends. Before we knew it time had flown. It was 3 a.m. -- too late for me to drive back to Rockville alone. So I began calling local hotels, searching for a room for the night.It quickly became clear to me that I would not find a room -- even the Hunt Valley Inn, 18 miles from downtown, didn't have a room.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
A phone number for filing complaints about Baltimore police officers connected callers this week instead to an adult chat line advertising "hot ladies. " The toll-free 800 number listed on the site until earlier this week was supposed be a 24-7 hot line for an internal investigations detective. But that's not what greeted callers. "Welcome to America's hottest talk line," a recorded female voice said. "Guys, hot ladies are waiting to talk with you. " The Web page was dated April 28, 2008, at 4:24 a.m. but a note at the bottom said it was updated on Dec. 18, 2012, at 11:39 p.m. It listed only the Public Affairs Office as its author.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | April 1, 2008
Lynn Shiner heard the news as she drifted off to sleep Sunday night, and when she awoke yesterday morning, she thought maybe she had dreamed it. A few taps on the keyboard, though, confirmed that the crime, however nightmarish, was no dream. Three children killed in a Baltimore hotel room, allegedly by their father, who had been engaged in a pitched custody battle with his estranged wife. "I see a judge denied her request," Shiner said, referring to a petition for a protective order that the children's mother, Amy Castillo, had filed against their father a couple of years ago after this threat: "He ... did tell me that the worst thing he could do to me would be to kill the children and not me so I could live without them."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
At more than 2,100 miles long, the Appalachian Trail is a dream crusher for many a hiker who has envisioned a walk from Georgia to Maine in one season. Unrelenting summer weather, elevation changes and rugged terrain combine to trash all but the strongest mentally and physically prepared hikers. Only 25 percent finish what they started. Even the 41-mile piece that cuts through Maryland — the second-shortest segment of all the states and fairly flat by AT standards — can feel overwhelming.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
In an unusual move, two Howard County Circuit Court judges presided yesterday over the sentencing of an Ellicott City man who was convicted for his role in the April armed robbery of the Columbia Hilton Inn. The two-judge sentencing resulted because Judge James B. Dudley became ill with asthma after the first day of the jury trial last month and did not return to court, leaving Judge Diane O. Leasure to oversee the second and final day. "That's the...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
Just a few months after her husband drowned their three children, Amy Castillo found herself standing on top of a mountain during a Christian missionary trip to China, winds whipping, rain pouring down. She asked herself a question: "Can I live with this?" A long time passed before she could honestly answer. The man she once playfully called "sexy thing," who swept her off her feet and quickly became her best friend, had gradually vanished over the past five years. In his place was a manic, suicidal stranger who spent entire nights at Baltimore strip clubs, blew thousands of dollars in wild shopping sprees and accused her of being self-righteous and manipulative.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Until recently, Antonnette Okunola was couch surfing with friends or sleeping in her car. She had lost her job and left her mother's home because of their strained relationship. She quickly became one of the hundreds of young adults in Baltimore who do not have a regular place to live. The 24-year-old woman works two part-time jobs now and last week moved into her own furnished apartment in Park Heights at Restoration Gardens, the first housing project in Maryland dedicated to homeless youths.
BUSINESS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
DENTON -- Would you, could you, spend $519,500 for a mid-18th-century mahogany Newport block-front kneehole desk? How about $3.3 million?Those were the bids for two of the desks, made in the 1760s by Edmund Townsend, one of Colonial America's best craftsmen, at Sotheby's in New York, one in 1994 and the other last month.But how about $1,500 for a first-class reproduction, one you can assemble and finish yourself at home and is the image of the 230-year-old originals? TC Released last year by the Bartley Collection of Denton, the kneehole desk demonstrates the small company's ever-improving ability to offer in kit form quality copies of the best 18th- and early 19th-century American and English furniture.
BUSINESS
By Mensah Dean and Mensah Dean,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
With an aim toward ending the frustrating waits that often meet new guests, Marriott Corp. plans to introduce a service that would cut in half the time it takes to check into one of its hotels.The service, which has been in development for three years, is called "1st 10."It is "based on the premise that the first 10 minutes of a guest's hotel experience are the most important in setting the stage for a successful stay," the company said."1st 10" is a call-ahead reservation service for Marriott's customers.
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