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NEWS
March 1, 2009
The Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road, will offer Thirst 'n' Howl Musical Productions' Rosie The Riveter, an original revue honoring the women of the 1940s who supported the home front during World War II, at 1 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free. "Heart Health for Women," a free program presented by Marilyn Smedberg-Gobbett, volunteer coordinator with the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, will be presented at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. She will discuss prevention, early detection, diagnosis and proper treatment.
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EXPLORE
August 7, 2013
I would like to thank the generous lady at the Laurel Regional Hospital. On Saturday, June 29, my daughter was in the hospital and desperately wanted to watch television. The cafeteria and gift shop were closed and I needed exact change ($8) to insert in the machine to get a card for TV in the room. I was at the front desk asking everyone if they had change. A visitor gave me $8 and I gave her a $20 bill. While I was inserting the money in the machine she slipped the $20 in my bag. She was too generous and I don't know how to thank her. Betty Frizzell Laurel
NEWS
April 26, 2005
Luril D. Greene-Curtis, a hotel worker, died of a heart attack Thursday at Maryland General Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 38. Born Luril D. Greene in Baltimore, she was raised on East Preston Street. After graduating in 1984 from the Institute of Notre Dame, she took at job with the FBI in Washington. In 1993, she became a hotel concierge at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore. She later held a job in human resources at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel and since last year had been working the front desk at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. Mrs. Greene-Curtis enjoyed dancing, cooking and entertaining.
NEWS
By Jean Block Bessmer | June 11, 1998
LAST Saturday night in Baltimore I slept with a couple I'd never met before. Well, it's a long story that came about because of the shortage of hotel rooms in the area.I had arrived in the city early in the evening to enjoy dinner with friends. Before we knew it time had flown. It was 3 a.m. -- too late for me to drive back to Rockville alone. So I began calling local hotels, searching for a room for the night.It quickly became clear to me that I would not find a room -- even the Hunt Valley Inn, 18 miles from downtown, didn't have a room.
BUSINESS
By Mensah Dean and Mensah Dean,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
With an aim toward ending the frustrating waits that often meet new guests, Marriott Corp. plans to introduce a service that would cut in half the time it takes to check into one of its hotels.The service, which has been in development for three years, is called "1st 10."It is "based on the premise that the first 10 minutes of a guest's hotel experience are the most important in setting the stage for a successful stay," the company said."1st 10" is a call-ahead reservation service for Marriott's customers.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
Chronically short of cash. Marriage a wreck. Ordered by a court to send most of his meager Army pay to his former wife and their two children. Mad at the world.David Sheldon Boone fit the profile. Like other accused spies before him, a shambles of a personal life apparently led Boone in 1988 to begin selling secrets -- in this case, top secret National Security Agency documents -- to a Soviet KGB spy named "Igor," according to the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Alexandria, Va.Ten years later, Boone, still broke and angry, met an FBI special agent posing as a Russian spy who asked if Boone wanted to resume spying.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
In an unusual move, two Howard County Circuit Court judges presided yesterday over the sentencing of an Ellicott City man who was convicted for his role in the April armed robbery of the Columbia Hilton Inn. The two-judge sentencing resulted because Judge James B. Dudley became ill with asthma after the first day of the jury trial last month and did not return to court, leaving Judge Diane O. Leasure to oversee the second and final day. "That's the...
NEWS
June 18, 2007
Joseph Charles Shaney, a retired computer operator, died of a stroke June 11 at his Towson home. He was 64. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bradford Street in Highlandtown, he was a 1961 graduate of Patterson High School and then joined the Navy, serving as a cryptologist in the Pacific. After his military service, Mr. Shaney became a computer operator and worked at the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, American Smelting, Mrs. Filbert's foods and the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, from which he retired seven years ago. In retirement, Mr. Shaney worked two days a week at the front desk of the Penthouse Condominium in Towson, and at his death he was a member of the Walkable Towson Committee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2008
Frances A. "Fran" Wilkins called the other day to talk about a recent column I had written about the fate of the old Port Welcome, the popular excursion vessel that sailed out of the Inner Harbor for nearly 30 years before being sold to new owners in Michigan in 1987. The object of Wilkins' veneration wasn't the Port Welcome, but rather the Wilson Line's Bay Belle, which she boarded each summer with her family during the 1950s. They were off on their annual voyage to Betterton and a two-week vacation at the end of July and into August at the now-demolished Hotel Rigbie.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
Just a few months after her husband drowned their three children, Amy Castillo found herself standing on top of a mountain during a Christian missionary trip to China, winds whipping, rain pouring down. She asked herself a question: "Can I live with this?" A long time passed before she could honestly answer. The man she once playfully called "sexy thing," who swept her off her feet and quickly became her best friend, had gradually vanished over the past five years. In his place was a manic, suicidal stranger who spent entire nights at Baltimore strip clubs, blew thousands of dollars in wild shopping sprees and accused her of being self-righteous and manipulative.
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