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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
If it weren't for Wessel's Florist & Weddings in historic Ellicott City, the Rev. Rod Ronneberg and other local ministers might go empty-handed at their Palm Sunday services today.Each year, Don Wessel, the florist shop's owner, sells palm crowns, $4.50 a bunch, to five local churches.Churches also rent palm trees from the 18-year-old shop to decorate their sanctuaries for Palm Sunday.Without Wessel's, "I don't know what I'd do," said Mr. Ronneberg, pastor of the 700-member St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Fulton.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A plant shot up about 6 feet in our yard recently. I never saw flowers, but the seeds remind me of ragweed. The leaf is not lacy like ragweed, though. It looks more like a stork footprint. What am I dealing with? There is a bumper crop of ragweed this year, and you have a species known as giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida), as opposed to common ragweed (Ambrosia artemissiifolia). Unfortunately, giant ragweed pollen causes highly allergic reactions, just like the more familiar species.
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NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
Several weeks ago you recommended 'Kwanzan' cherry as an "excellent street tree," but the cherry trees in our neighborhood look terrible. Why do you recommend this tree? Perhaps I should dampen my zeal for the 'Kwanzan' cherry. It is prone to disease and insect damage and the trunk seems to be especially vulnerable to damage from string trimmers and lawn mowers. I have seen some outstanding trees ruined when the bark was inadvertently struck by mowing equipment. It caused the trees to form large cankers and then decline.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The palm tree, like so much here, rose to fame largely because of vanity and image control, then met its downfall when the money ran out. The Los Angeles City Council, fed up with the cost of caring for the trees, with their errant fronds that plunge perilously each winter, and with the fact that they provide little shade, has declared them the enemy of the urban forest and wishes that most would disappear. The city plans to plant a million trees of other types over the next several years so that, as palms die off, most will be replaced with sycamores, crape myrtles and other trees indigenous to Southern California.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The palm tree, like so much here, rose to fame largely because of vanity and image control, then met its downfall when the money ran out. The Los Angeles City Council, fed up with the cost of caring for the trees, with their errant fronds that plunge perilously each winter, and with the fact that they provide little shade, has declared them the enemy of the urban forest and wishes that most would disappear. The city plans to plant a million trees of other types over the next several years so that, as palms die off, most will be replaced with sycamores, crape myrtles and other trees indigenous to Southern California.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A plant shot up about 6 feet in our yard recently. I never saw flowers, but the seeds remind me of ragweed. The leaf is not lacy like ragweed, though. It looks more like a stork footprint. What am I dealing with? There is a bumper crop of ragweed this year, and you have a species known as giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida), as opposed to common ragweed (Ambrosia artemissiifolia). Unfortunately, giant ragweed pollen causes highly allergic reactions, just like the more familiar species.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
Ocean City--He's known as "de hat mon."Gary Lustic weaves palm leaves into baseball caps, derbies, Panamas and cowboy and Polynesian-style hats right before his customers' eyes."
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
A Memorable Place Brazilian farm, waxing and waning By Sally Foster SPECIAL TO THE SUN Can we visit Picada?" I asked Rejane. I knew the farm had been more or less abandoned after her grandfather died. Still, I had fond memories of the old homestead in the interior of Rio Grande do Norte state in Brazil. I remembered the carnauba trees growing along the river banks and at the edge of the lagoon. I also thought of the farm workers and their simple adobe homes. I used to stop and talk to the women, sitting on the ground, smoking their pipes and shelling long green beans called feijao verde.
NEWS
By KATHY VAN MULLEKOM and KATHY VAN MULLEKOM,DAILY PRESS | July 30, 2006
Ferns have found a steadfast friend in Jim Orband. He believes their soothing looks and easy personalities deserve all the respect and use they can get in any kind of garden -- big or small, country or city, formal or informal. "So many people don't include ferns in their landscape, and they're really missing out on some nice plants," says Orband, Virginia Cooperative Extension's horticulture agent in York County, Va. He also practices what he preaches in his small but densely planted garden in Yorktown, Va. There, more than 20 types of ferns are tucked among large shrubs such as hydrangea, nandina, fatsia and mahonia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1998
In less time than it took to hear yesterday's Gospel, some Highlandtown churchgoers braided yellowish palm leaves into the little crosses they'll keep for the coming year -- part of a centuries-old tradition still carried on at Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church in the center of Highlandtown's Italian-American community.The most accomplished of these Palm-Sunday weavers can work their dextrous fingers to produce fantastic designs.It only happens on Palm Sunday, though, which initiates Holy Week, when Christians commemorate the day when the Gospel writers state that Jesus Christ entered Jerusalem in triumph as crowds waved palm fronds.
NEWS
By KATHY VAN MULLEKOM and KATHY VAN MULLEKOM,DAILY PRESS | July 30, 2006
Ferns have found a steadfast friend in Jim Orband. He believes their soothing looks and easy personalities deserve all the respect and use they can get in any kind of garden -- big or small, country or city, formal or informal. "So many people don't include ferns in their landscape, and they're really missing out on some nice plants," says Orband, Virginia Cooperative Extension's horticulture agent in York County, Va. He also practices what he preaches in his small but densely planted garden in Yorktown, Va. There, more than 20 types of ferns are tucked among large shrubs such as hydrangea, nandina, fatsia and mahonia.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 29, 2004
Several weeks ago you recommended 'Kwanzan' cherry as an "excellent street tree," but the cherry trees in our neighborhood look terrible. Why do you recommend this tree? Perhaps I should dampen my zeal for the 'Kwanzan' cherry. It is prone to disease and insect damage and the trunk seems to be especially vulnerable to damage from string trimmers and lawn mowers. I have seen some outstanding trees ruined when the bark was inadvertently struck by mowing equipment. It caused the trees to form large cankers and then decline.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
A Memorable Place Brazilian farm, waxing and waning By Sally Foster SPECIAL TO THE SUN Can we visit Picada?" I asked Rejane. I knew the farm had been more or less abandoned after her grandfather died. Still, I had fond memories of the old homestead in the interior of Rio Grande do Norte state in Brazil. I remembered the carnauba trees growing along the river banks and at the edge of the lagoon. I also thought of the farm workers and their simple adobe homes. I used to stop and talk to the women, sitting on the ground, smoking their pipes and shelling long green beans called feijao verde.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1998
In less time than it took to hear yesterday's Gospel, some Highlandtown churchgoers braided yellowish palm leaves into the little crosses they'll keep for the coming year -- part of a centuries-old tradition still carried on at Our Lady of Pompei Roman Catholic Church in the center of Highlandtown's Italian-American community.The most accomplished of these Palm-Sunday weavers can work their dextrous fingers to produce fantastic designs.It only happens on Palm Sunday, though, which initiates Holy Week, when Christians commemorate the day when the Gospel writers state that Jesus Christ entered Jerusalem in triumph as crowds waved palm fronds.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
If it weren't for Wessel's Florist & Weddings in historic Ellicott City, the Rev. Rod Ronneberg and other local ministers might go empty-handed at their Palm Sunday services today.Each year, Don Wessel, the florist shop's owner, sells palm crowns, $4.50 a bunch, to five local churches.Churches also rent palm trees from the 18-year-old shop to decorate their sanctuaries for Palm Sunday.Without Wessel's, "I don't know what I'd do," said Mr. Ronneberg, pastor of the 700-member St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Fulton.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
Ocean City--He's known as "de hat mon."Gary Lustic weaves palm leaves into baseball caps, derbies, Panamas and cowboy and Polynesian-style hats right before his customers' eyes."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | April 2, 2007
To answer the question "What Would Jesus Do?" on Palm Sunday, an increasing number of churches have a new answer: fair-trade fronds. The re-enactment of Jesus' entrance into Jerusalem is traditionally marked annually by the feverish fluttering of palm fronds at services worldwide to usher in Holy Week, which ends with Easter Sunday. In Catonsville for the first time yesterday, more than 100 worshipers at Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church waved "eco-palms" shaped liked giant hands as a congregant dressed as Jesus entered the sanctuary up the center aisle.
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1998
Ferns, at more than 400 million years old, are among the world's oldest plants; their fossil remains in rocks and coal record their ancient past. Yet today, in what is called the post-modern age, they are being bought, bred and planted with enthusiasm.Numerous fern organizations here and abroad have Web sites on the Internet. Sophisticated gardeners, whose numbers are growing as the gardening boom continues, appreciate the lush background that these flowerless perennials give flowers as well as the texture of their foliage, which, depending on the species, varies from delicate to coarse.
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