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By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
It's deja vu for Todd Frohwirth and the Orioles, but this time the right-handed reliever won't go into spring training as an unknown.Frohwirth, who along with bullpen partner Gregg Olson wasn't tendered a contract by the Dec. 20 deadline, yesterday agreed to a minor-league contract with the Orioles. He has been invited to spring training as a non-roster player, as he was three years ago.After spending six years in the Philadelphia Phillies organization, Frohwirth signed a minor-league contract with the Orioles in 1991, trying to win a spot on a pitching staff in dire need of help.
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By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
Manager Davey Johnson reiterated the Orioles' need for another right-handed reliever yesterday, and one option might be Todd Frohwirth, who has agreed to terms on a minor-league contract."
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By JOHN EISENBERG | March 3, 1993
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Inside each of us there lurks someone we would want to be for at least a couple of minutes, a rock star or diva, or maybe a famous fat chef. Todd Frohwirth, the Orioles' unassuming relief pitcher, a Midwesterner so mild in temperament that he hasn't flinched since his first date, checks in with a stunner."Have you ever met Bobby Knight?" he asked yesterday before a morning workout at Twin Lakes Park.Is it so, Froh? The calmest of all Orioles is a Gen. Bob wannabe?"Kinda weird, huh?"
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By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
Mark Eichhorn's season appears to have started almost a month late. It's as though somebody threw the pitch switch to the "on" position May 1 instead of April 4.As sophisticated as baseball has become, nobody can fully explain how these things happen -- they just do. In Eichhorn's case, the missing ingredients were easy to identify.When the sidearming right-hander threw the ball early in the season, there was no movement and generally poor location. He was releasing the ball too soon, and paying a heavy price (a 7.56 earned run average)
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By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Submarine-style reliever Todd Frohwirth experienced the reality of life as a pitcher who doesn't overwork the radar gun: produce today or perish tomorrow.The Orioles granted Frohwirth his release, one of four cuts they made yesterday, after he declined an invitation to open the year at Triple-A Rochester.In three seasons out of the Orioles' bullpen, Frohwirth went 11-6 with a 2.18 ERA and averaged 99 1/3 innings.A nonroster invitee to spring training, Frohwirth second-guessed himself for accepting the invitation.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | June 22, 1992
The conventional wisdom is that he's tough to hit because batters rarely see his down-under style and have difficulty adapting to it.Todd Frohwirth doesn't buy that theory and lately, neither do American League hitters.They have been catching up to Frohwirth with increasing frequency, garnering 20 hits in his past 10 innings. Of the past 25 runners he has inherited, 12 have scored and almost half of the past 57 hitters he has faced (25) have reached base.But Frohwirth and manager Johnny Oates are not panicking, attributing the slump to a fallow period all pitchers encounter during a season.
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By Ken Murray and Jim Henneman and Ken Murray and Jim Henneman,Staff Writers | May 1, 1993
His first love was basketball, his pitching style is unorthodox, and he is virtually unflappable in the face of adversity.That's not all that separates Todd Frohwirth from the typical player.He carries no pretenses when it comes to knowing his place in the Orioles' bullpen. And don't call him the team's closer.That, he says, is merely a temporary condition that will be remedied once Gregg Olson finds his groove."I don't enjoy the role because it means the best pitcher in our bullpen is having a tough week," Frohwirth said.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
The calendar reads September and players and fans scan the right-field out-of-town scoreboard at Oriole Park nearly as closely as the main scoreboard for signs that the Toronto Blue Jays are cracking.With the Blue Jays playing in Kansas City and then at Texas, both an hour behind Baltimore, Orioles players quickly scamper and huddle around clubhouse televisions to watch and root against Toronto.Yes, the pennant race is here for everyone. That is, everyone but ToddFrohwirth and Alan Mills, the backbones -- along with closer Gregg Olson -- of the Orioles bullpen.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Reliever Todd Frohwirth didn't throw particularly well yesterday, which wouldn't normally be cause for concern at this early stage of spring training. It is only noteworthy because Frohwirth is concerned about his future for the first time since he arrived in Baltimore.Three straight seasons as one of the workhorses of the Orioles bullpen does not guarantee him anything in a camp that is heavy with potential relief candidates. He came to camp as a nonroster invitee after signing a minor-league contract, so he has no way of knowing where he'll be on Opening Day."
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Before yesterday's game against the Philadelphia Phillies, Todd Frohwirth was asked what it was like to face his old team."You know," the Orioles reliever said, glancing toward the visitors' dugout, "I look over there and I really don't have anyfeeling."That was before the game. In the last two innings, Frohwirth watched from the mound as six Phillies scored, two having hit home runs. The late burst ended the Orioles' four-game exhibition winning streak, as a 4-2 lead became an 8-4 loss.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Milton Kent and Milestones and Memories contributed to this article | May 18, 1994
The only career shutout for Arthur Rhodes came July 29, 1992, at Yankee Stadium.Reminded that he shut out the Yankees, Rhodes said, "Yes I did. That was one of my better games and I hope to do even better this time."Rhodes didn't say exactly what would be better than a shutout, but he will get a chance to show it Saturday against the Yankees in his first start since May 1. Rhodes is on the 15-day disabled list with tendinitis in his right knee."I'll be starting Saturday in New York," Rhodes said, revealing classified information the club had been guarding with Pentagon-like secrecy.
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By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
Orioles left-hander Arthur Rhodes' injury rehabilitation start last night in Kinston, N.C., could not have gone much better.Rhodes pitched five shutout innings, allowed three hits, did not walk a batter and struck out seven, pitching for the Frederick Keys against the Kinston Indians in the Single-A Carolina League. The unofficial pitch count was 75.Rhodes went on the 15-day disabled list after coming out of his May 1 start in Oakland in the fifth inning suffering from tendinitis in the right kneecap.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Submarine-style reliever Todd Frohwirth experienced the reality of life as a pitcher who doesn't overwork the radar gun: produce today or perish tomorrow.The Orioles granted Frohwirth his release, one of four cuts they made yesterday, after he declined an invitation to open the year at Triple-A Rochester.In three seasons out of the Orioles' bullpen, Frohwirth went 11-6 with a 2.18 ERA and averaged 99 1/3 innings.A nonroster invitee to spring training, Frohwirth second-guessed himself for accepting the invitation.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Johnny Oates had an off-season wish list that was very basic. "Pitching . . . more pitching . . . and more pitching," was his request.After 11 untidy exhibition games what the Orioles manager has seen has been less pitching . . . even less pitching . . . and even less pitching. To say that nobody has stepped forward is like saying the weather in Baltimore has been uncomfortable this winter.A little more than a third of the way through the preseason schedule, the Orioles still are trying to find a way to get the other team out.There actually were three encouraging performances here yesterday, but one came from a rookie (Rick Forney)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Reliever Todd Frohwirth didn't throw particularly well yesterday, which wouldn't normally be cause for concern at this early stage of spring training. It is only noteworthy because Frohwirth is concerned about his future for the first time since he arrived in Baltimore.Three straight seasons as one of the workhorses of the Orioles bullpen does not guarantee him anything in a camp that is heavy with potential relief candidates. He came to camp as a nonroster invitee after signing a minor-league contract, so he has no way of knowing where he'll be on Opening Day."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 21, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Philadelphia vs. St. Louis, Busch Stadium, 1989. Dan Quisenberry had never met Todd Frohwirth. But as batting practice ended, Quisenberry was waiting for him in right field."
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
FORT MYERS, Fla. -- There is one cloud in the Orioles' otherwise brilliantly rosy pitching picture this spring.For the second time in five appearances, Todd Frohwirth was treated rudely yesterday. The right-handed reliever gave up four runs in the ninth inning of the 8-5 win over the Minnesota Twins.It was the second time that Frohwirth had given up that many runs in the ninth inning -- the Philadelphia Phillies got that many to beat him, 8-4, 10 days ago."Am I concerned?" manager John Oates repeated a question.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 25, 1993
MINNEAPOLIS -- There are routine trips to the mound made by the pitching coach. Then there are trips such as Dick Bosman's in the seventh inning of the Orioles' 9-2 win yesterday.Not so routine.Unless your idea of routine is a bug-eyed screaming match between Bosman and Todd Frohwirth, with catcher Chris Hoiles feeling the need to step between them.It happened at the one tense moment of a day on which the Orioles took the lead in the first inning and never lost it. The Orioles were up two, but the Twins had the bases loaded with one out. Frohwirth, having replaced starter Jamie Moyer, had completed the loading process by walking the ninth hitter in the Twins' order, Pat Meares, on four low pitches.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
It's deja vu for Todd Frohwirth and the Orioles, but this time the right-handed reliever won't go into spring training as an unknown.Frohwirth, who along with bullpen partner Gregg Olson wasn't tendered a contract by the Dec. 20 deadline, yesterday agreed to a minor-league contract with the Orioles. He has been invited to spring training as a non-roster player, as he was three years ago.After spending six years in the Philadelphia Phillies organization, Frohwirth signed a minor-league contract with the Orioles in 1991, trying to win a spot on a pitching staff in dire need of help.
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