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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
When Froggy staged a crime spree to finance his wooing of Miss Mousie, children's book author Kevin O'Malley had the court send him to prison for a long stretch.But when O'Malley's fanciful "gangster" version of the old folk tale got the boot from Baltimore County elementary schools last spring after one parent complained, the author never had his day court -- neither a hearing nor notification of the ban. The rules don't require it.Now, after appeals from O'Malley and from Clara Grizzard, a neighbor and art educator, school officials have decided to allow O'Malley to plead his case.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley , Mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
Maryland author E.D. Baker recently sampled the delights of chauffeured limousines and red carpets, of photo-ops with film stars and designer desserts. Then she returned to her family's Harford County horse farm and mucked out the stalls. Baker is the children's novelist whose first book, "The Frog Princess," inspired the Disney animated film, "The Princess and the Frog." Not only is she credited in the film, but the entertainment conglomerate flew her to Los Angeles in late November to attend the premiere.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost | October 20, 1996
AS THE FUROR over Froggy, that gun-toting mouse-wooer and miscreant, drags into its third week, it is worth remembering what Nobel Prize-winning author Isaac Bashevis Singer observed about how children approach stories differently than adults.''Children don't read to find their identity,'' he said. ''They don't read to free themselves of guilt, to quench the thirst for rebellion, or to get rid of alienation. They have no use for psychology. They detest sociology. They still believe in good, the family, angels, witches, goblins, logic, clarity, punctuation and other such obsolete stuff.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2007
Insecure people can find it a liberating experience to pretend they are someone else. (Actors know this -- it's why some of them became actors in the first place.) The late playwright Larry Shue used that psychological phenomenon as the basis of his comedy The Foreigner. A lively and entertaining production of the show is running at Howard Community College through Dec. 16. Charlie Baker is a young Englishman who is so shy he can't talk to people and can't stand people talking to him. We learn that his wife (we never meet her)
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
Children's author Kevin O'Malley will know within 10 days whether his "gangster" version of the old folk tale, "Froggy Went A-Courtin' ," will be restored to Baltimore County elementary school libraries.Phyllis Bailey, associate superintendent for educational support services, listened for more than an hour yesterday as Israel Weitzman of Pikesville explained his complaint that led to the book's being banned in the spring. O'Malley rebutted the arguments, and school officials explained the procedure they used to remove the book.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
Has Froggy paid his debt to society? Should the wayward amphibian win parole and be allowed back into Baltimore County elementary school libraries?Kevin O'Malley of Rodgers Forge said yesterday he will try to overturn the school system's ban on his out-of-print 1940s gangster version of "Froggy Goes A-Courtin' " -- as much to clear his professional reputation as anything else.The author-illustrator, 35, learned yesterday that Maryland law gives superintendents authority to deal with "controversies" and sets up an appeal procedure that could lead to the county and state boards of education.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Froggy did a-courtin' go -- safe-cracking, smoking and carousing along the way. Instead of heaven, this menu of misdeeds landed Froggy in the slammer for seven to 11.But the moral of Kevin O'Malley's lavishly illustrated version of the old folk song -- crime doesn't pay -- couldn't save "Froggy Went A-Courtin' " from becoming what may be the first book in at least 27 years to be pulled from Baltimore County school libraries.The illustrations, done in the style of a 1940s Jimmy Cagney-type gangster movie, led to the ban, which is "selection" not "censorship," said Della Curtis, the school library coordinator.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
ClarificationA headline and an article in The Sun yesterday conveyed th impression that author Kevin O'Malley was contemplating a lawsuit against the Baltimore County school system over cancellation of an appearance at Church Lane Elementary School and loss of an $800 fee.O'Malley said he is not contemplating a suit over the cancellation and lost fee. He said that he is following the prescribed appeal process to challenge the ban on his version of "Froggy...
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
Froggy is back -- this time on parole.The "gangster" version of the folk tale "Froggy Went A-Courtin' " is no longer banned from Baltimore County elementary school libraries but will be accessible only to parents and teachers to read with children.School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione accepted a recommendation Friday to overturn the ban on children's author Kevin O'Malley's satirical version of the Froggy story, which ends with the amphibian in a cell wearing prison stripes.The recommendation, from Phyllis Bailey, associate superintendent for educational support services, includes changing the procedure for reviewing books that are the subject complaints.
NEWS
November 4, 1996
SCHOOL SYSTEMS set themselves up for controversy whenever they make rulings involving what values should be imparted to children, or what materials are appropriate for them, simply because these are subjective matters.Hence, the furor over local author Kevin O'Malley's "Frog Went A' Courtin.' " The book was done in the style of a 1940s gangster saga with a trampy-vampy Miss Mousie and a Froggy who smokes, hangs out with seedy characters, robs banks and ends up in the slammer. Mr. O'Malley is a talented illustrator, but artistic value has never been the overriding concern among those who evaluate the appropriateness of children's literature.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | March 30, 2007
A springtime search for amphibian amour Ah, spring. Birds twitter. Blossoms sway in the breeze. And toads burst out of the muck, croak around the clock and lay mounds of gelatinous eggs. Like many species, toads spend the spring looking for love. "They have no cares in the world right now, except each other," says Courtney Peed, a naturalist who will lead a hike through the Oregon Ridge Nature Center in Cockeysville tonight. She says this as she points to a pair of toads floating near the muddy bank of a pond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 13, 2003
This is the last weekend to catch Larry Shue's farce The Foreigner at the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. Michael Sullivan plays Charlie Baker, a man so painfully shy that he pretends not to speak English, just to avoid conversations with strangers. Peter Jensen plays Froggy LeSueur, the friend who concocts this plan of silence to save Charlie from humiliation. And Sherrionne Brown is the innkeeper at whose establishment bashful Charlie becomes the reluctant repository of all sorts of little secrets.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | September 12, 2001
FOREST FROGS Tomato frogs are only found in Madagascar, an island nation to the west of Africa, mainly in forest areas. The adults can grow pretty big! Males can be 2 1/2 inches in lenght while females can be 3 to 4 inches long. Their colors range from reddish-orange to dark red. What's for dinner? Crickets, worms and even mice! Do you know? Are tomato frogs poisonous? Answer: They are not toxic but can give off a very sticky white mucus that can be irritating to human eyes. Learn more!
FEATURES
By Courtesy Barnes & Noble, children's division, Annapolis Harbour Center | August 30, 1998
Do you have someone who is starting school this fall? After you finish shopping for new shoes and a pencil box, stop by your library and check out these "school" books.* "Berenstain Bears Go to School," by Stan and Jan Berenstain* "Spot Goes to School," by Eric Hill* "Time for School, Little Dinosaur," by Gail Herman* "Froggy Goes to School," by Jonathan London* "My Friend Harry," by Kim Lewis* "Will I Have a Friend?" by Miriam Cohen* "The Secret Shortcut," by Mark TeaguePub Date: 8/30/98
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Anthony Wisnieski and Erik Anderson think they've figured out how to put a frog in a romantic mood.They have plenty of proof to show for it: Their rare Madagascar tomato frogs went a-courtin' at the Baltimore Zoo, and now they have about 4,000 baby tomato frogs and tadpoles.Wisnieski, the zoo's curator of amphibians, and Anderson, the amphibian keeper, say they have developed an environmental setting -- the right blend of humidity, air temperatures and lighting -- that induces the frogs to mate.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 1997
Two comedies, "The Foreigner" and "Arsenic and Old Lace," are being staged at the Chesapeake Music Hall on alternate weekends through April 30, and both are worth seeing."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
When Froggy staged a crime spree to finance his wooing of Miss Mousie, children's book author Kevin O'Malley had the court send him to prison for a long stretch.But when O'Malley's fanciful "gangster" version of the old folk tale got the boot from Baltimore County elementary schools last spring after one parent complained, the author never had his day court -- neither a hearing nor notification of the ban. The rules don't require it.Now, after appeals from O'Malley and from Clara Grizzard, a neighbor and art educator, school officials have decided to hold an unprecedented meeting to allow O'Malley to plead his case.
FEATURES
October 16, 1996
In "Froggy Went-A-Courtin'," Rodgers Forge illustrator Kevin O'Malley takes an old folk song and turns it into the story of a cigar-smoking, gun-toting amphibian living a life of crime. At the end of the book, Froggy gets tossed in the slammer for his wayward ways. But his troubles aren't over. Now educators have thrown Froggy out of Baltimore County school libraries to keep children from hopping down the same path. It's up to O'Malley to defend him. Here the illustrator tells the stirring tale of a frog and a man fighting for their reputations.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
Froggy is back -- this time on parole.The "gangster" version of the folk tale "Froggy Went A-Courtin' " is no longer banned from Baltimore County elementary school libraries but will be accessible only to parents and teachers to read with children.School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione accepted a recommendation Friday to overturn the ban on children's author Kevin O'Malley's satirical version of the Froggy story, which ends with the amphibian in a cell wearing prison stripes.The recommendation, from Phyllis Bailey, associate superintendent for educational support services, includes changing the procedure for reviewing books that are the subject complaints.
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