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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 14, 1996
Fritz Kreisler, The Complete RCA Recordings (BMG Classics 09026-61649-2)Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) ruled the violin world from about 1910 to 1920. When the young Jascha Heifetz entered the arena after World War I, he forced the older Kreisler to share top honors, though with a difference.Heifetz was "the violinist," achieving by bow arm and fingers a standard of perfection still unequaled. But nobody ever loved the cool and remote (personally, not musically) Heifetz; you kneel before Mount Olympus -- you do not embrace it.Kreisler, on the other hand, was "the violin."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 22, 2009
Most of Baltimore's classical music ensembles will take a break during the holidays, but one of them is going full-throttle - half a world away. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, about 40 members strong, heads to China on Saturday for a five-concert gig in Suzhou, a city of 5.9 million in the Yangtze River Delta. The trip is all the more remarkable, given the BCO's recent troubles. "Eleven months ago, things were dicey," says music director Markand Thakar. Back then, adds executive director Lockwood Hoehl, "We were waiting to see if the board was going to close up shop."
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 10, 2000
The Baltimore Symphony has cooked up an expanded version of its annual Summer MusicFest. For the first time, outdoor activities will be held before each concert, not just afterward. "We're trying to make this a festival in the true sense of the word," says Greg Tucker, the BSO's director of public relations and community affairs. "There will be music, dancing, food and fun." With an eye toward grabbing the downtown, happy hour-seeking office crowd and other customers, the festival, which runs June 28-July 14, will crank up at 5:30 p.m. on concert nights at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 10, 2000
The Baltimore Symphony has cooked up an expanded version of its annual Summer MusicFest. For the first time, outdoor activities will be held before each concert, not just afterward. "We're trying to make this a festival in the true sense of the word," says Greg Tucker, the BSO's director of public relations and community affairs. "There will be music, dancing, food and fun." With an eye toward grabbing the downtown, happy hour-seeking office crowd and other customers, the festival, which runs June 28-July 14, will crank up at 5:30 p.m. on concert nights at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1998
One of the most interesting events of the current classical music season is about to pass us by almost unnoticed. It is a free concert this Sunday at 3 p.m. at Temple Oheb Shalom by the Kiev Camerata, with piano soloist Mykola Suk, conducted by Virko Baley.Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, is the birthplace of Russian culture. It has also always been an international city, with large ethnic German and Jewish populations. (Before World War I, Kiev's street signs were in Yiddish as well as Cyrillic lettering.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 20, 1992
Rumor has it that when Maxim Vengerov came to the United States last year, Midori began to wish she had learned how to type.The Siberian-born violinist, who makes his local debut tonight performing the Mendelssohn Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, is the most highly touted fiddle player to ++ come to these shores in a long, long time. Although the 18-year-old Vengerov is still a newcomer here, he's become a household word in Western Europe and Japan where he's been appearing since he was a 13-year-old Wunderkind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 22, 2009
Most of Baltimore's classical music ensembles will take a break during the holidays, but one of them is going full-throttle - half a world away. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, about 40 members strong, heads to China on Saturday for a five-concert gig in Suzhou, a city of 5.9 million in the Yangtze River Delta. The trip is all the more remarkable, given the BCO's recent troubles. "Eleven months ago, things were dicey," says music director Markand Thakar. Back then, adds executive director Lockwood Hoehl, "We were waiting to see if the board was going to close up shop."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 8, 1995
Jascha Heifetz was almost universally acknowledged as the world's supreme classical instrumentalist -- an honor no other performer on any instrument, in his lifetime or since, has enjoyed. His reputation, unlike those achieved today when musicians try to become "personalities," was based solely on musical considerations."I wish you would keep it short," the violinist once told an interviewer. "Just make it 'Born in Russia, first lesson at 3, debut at 7, debut in America in 1917.' That's all there is really, about two lines."
NEWS
July 11, 2003
On July 10, 2003, BERTHOLD FLEHINGER, beloved husband of Sarah Charlotte Flehinger (nee Rubin) formerly of Pikesville, MD., loving father of Rebecca Rosenheck of Scotch Plains, N.J. and Laura Cochran of Springfield, VA, dear father-in-law of Dr. David Rosenheck and David Cochran, adored brother of Ruth Kreisler, dear brother-in-law of the late Fritz Kreisler. Loving grandfather of Max, Eve and Michael Rosenheck, dear uncle of Ellen Helfman. Services and Interment at Chevra Ahavas Chesed Cemetery, Randallstown, MD on Friday July 11 at 2 P.M. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made in his memory to The American Heart Association, 415 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD (21201)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1996
Mark McCoy, the new conductor of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony pressed into service after Scott Speck's resignation in November, was impressive at his debut at Maryland Hall.McCoy got my attention immediately in the brooding tempo that opens Beethoven's "Leonore" Overture. Rather than give his players an artificial boost through those lengthy phrases and searching harmonies, McCoy stuck to his (and Beethoven's) guns, demanding and getting sustained playing that covered over virtually every potentially empty space.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1998
One of the most interesting events of the current classical music season is about to pass us by almost unnoticed. It is a free concert this Sunday at 3 p.m. at Temple Oheb Shalom by the Kiev Camerata, with piano soloist Mykola Suk, conducted by Virko Baley.Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, is the birthplace of Russian culture. It has also always been an international city, with large ethnic German and Jewish populations. (Before World War I, Kiev's street signs were in Yiddish as well as Cyrillic lettering.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 14, 1996
Fritz Kreisler, The Complete RCA Recordings (BMG Classics 09026-61649-2)Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) ruled the violin world from about 1910 to 1920. When the young Jascha Heifetz entered the arena after World War I, he forced the older Kreisler to share top honors, though with a difference.Heifetz was "the violinist," achieving by bow arm and fingers a standard of perfection still unequaled. But nobody ever loved the cool and remote (personally, not musically) Heifetz; you kneel before Mount Olympus -- you do not embrace it.Kreisler, on the other hand, was "the violin."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 8, 1995
Jascha Heifetz was almost universally acknowledged as the world's supreme classical instrumentalist -- an honor no other performer on any instrument, in his lifetime or since, has enjoyed. His reputation, unlike those achieved today when musicians try to become "personalities," was based solely on musical considerations."I wish you would keep it short," the violinist once told an interviewer. "Just make it 'Born in Russia, first lesson at 3, debut at 7, debut in America in 1917.' That's all there is really, about two lines."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 20, 1992
Rumor has it that when Maxim Vengerov came to the United States last year, Midori began to wish she had learned how to type.The Siberian-born violinist, who makes his local debut tonight performing the Mendelssohn Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, is the most highly touted fiddle player to ++ come to these shores in a long, long time. Although the 18-year-old Vengerov is still a newcomer here, he's become a household word in Western Europe and Japan where he's been appearing since he was a 13-year-old Wunderkind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | June 18, 2000
"Aqui esta encerrada el alma de ... " This tantalizing inscription in Spanish was written by Sir Edward Elgar on the score of his Violin Concerto in 1910. When asked by a friend to translate and explain it, he responded: "Here, or more emphatically 'in here,' is enshrined or simply enclosed -- 'buried' is perhaps too definite -- the soul of? The final 'de' leaves it indefinite as to sex or rather gender." He might as well just have said, "That's for me to know and for you to find out." Several candidates have been proposed as being the source of the enshrined or enclosed soul, all of them female.
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