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By Diane Rossen Worthington, Tribune Media Services | January 6, 2010
For the overworked cook looking to make an easy one-pan main course, you can't do better than a frittata. Think of it as brunch in a pan. Chock-full of breakfast favorites like potatoes and bacon, this flat, open-faced, round omelet is cooked over low heat until firm and then finished in the oven. It's perfect for entertaining. The recipe is adaptable to whatever ingredients you enjoy. Swap out the bacon for ham, use cooked pasta instead of potatoes or try goat cheese instead of Cheddar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Food Network star Giada De Laurentiis says that her mother would make frittatas, the Italian egg dish, with whatever leftovers she had in the refrigerator. " That was the joke," she tells viewers in segment of her cooking show. "What's in the frittata today, Mama?" What better dish to serve Mom on Mother's Day? A frittata is quick and easy, and the kids can help. As a bonus, Mom wakes to a clean fridge. An omelet without the fold and a quiche without the crust, the frittata has its own selling points: It can be sliced and eaten, hot or cold, with a fork or fingers.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 17, 2007
I may not be able to bench-press 300 pounds. I may not grasp the subtleties of the international balance of payments. But I can flip a frittata. When I tossed one out of the skillet recently, it was a personal culinary milestone. It was also supper. I am a latecomer to the frittata, which is the Italian version of the omelet. The one my wife and I made for supper the other night, loaded with pieces of Italian sausage, fresh herbs and garden tomatoes, has sold me on the concept. I enjoy an occasional omelet, but it is eggy, soupy and French.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Rossen Worthington, Tribune Media Services | January 6, 2010
For the overworked cook looking to make an easy one-pan main course, you can't do better than a frittata. Think of it as brunch in a pan. Chock-full of breakfast favorites like potatoes and bacon, this flat, open-faced, round omelet is cooked over low heat until firm and then finished in the oven. It's perfect for entertaining. The recipe is adaptable to whatever ingredients you enjoy. Swap out the bacon for ham, use cooked pasta instead of potatoes or try goat cheese instead of Cheddar.
NEWS
By Donna Crivello and Donna Crivello,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2002
When I was in my early teens and just becoming more aware of the different foods outside my home, I wondered why my mother never folded over her omelets. I would watch her slide the almost-cooked, eggy, plate-sized disk onto a bigger plate, then slip it back into the pan to cook it on the other side. At other times, she would finish cooking it with a lid or under the broiler. This was a frittata, an Italian omelet that has cheese and vegetables mixed in with the eggs and is "baked" in the pan. It is slightly firmer than the classic French omelet because it is cooked slowly over a lower heat and its center finishes last.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Food Network star Giada De Laurentiis says that her mother would make frittatas, the Italian egg dish, with whatever leftovers she had in the refrigerator. " That was the joke," she tells viewers in segment of her cooking show. "What's in the frittata today, Mama?" What better dish to serve Mom on Mother's Day? A frittata is quick and easy, and the kids can help. As a bonus, Mom wakes to a clean fridge. An omelet without the fold and a quiche without the crust, the frittata has its own selling points: It can be sliced and eaten, hot or cold, with a fork or fingers.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | September 21, 1994
Eggs have been banished in many a health-conscious household, but they're worth reconsidering because there are many creative and healthful ways to prepare them. Egg substitutes, for instance, are a fine and tasty replacement in egg recipes, when cholesterol and fat are a concern. As long as they are spiced up a bit or flavored with vegetables or low-fat meat, it is virtually impossible to distinguish them from the shell egg.To reduce cholesterol without using substitutes, you can use shell eggs but separate the eggs and use more whites than yolks.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | December 29, 2004
This is the season to fight the chilly weather with hot soups, braised meats and warm desserts. Diane Rossen Worthington, author of 14 cookbooks including The Taste of Summer, explores the dishes of fall and winter in her new book, The Taste of the Season (Chronicle Books, 2004, $24.95). Her goal, she says, is to follow up on her summer book with a book that celebrates the cool months through dishes that feature seasonal produce and could be served at the holiday table. Among the 75 or so recipes are Winter Frittata, which can be assembled in advance and served for a holiday brunch; Spicy Chicken Gumbo, which is perfect for a Super Bowl celebration; and a comforting Turkey Potpie with a Puff Pastry Crust, which would be a fine dinner to serve on a snowy evening.
FEATURES
By Irene Sax and Irene Sax,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1996
I'm sick of stodge. I'm tired of stew, and of mashed potatoes, and of what food writers like to call "elemental" soups. I'm ready to eat something fresh.But even though temperatures are rising and spring seems a possibility, fresh food -- really fresh, not flown from another hemisphere -- is months away. And so I turn to parsley, an old friend that tastes like everything that's fresh and green in the world.Once, parsley was the only fresh herb I could find in winter, and it was always curly parsley.
FEATURES
By VERA CALABRIA and VERA CALABRIA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 25, 2006
Growing up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, I learned early how to cope with the stresses of our annual crazy, eccentric Carnival, which this year began yesterday, and ends Tuesday, the dawning of Lent. The secrets to surviving Carnival are to stay hydrated and to eat just enough to keep going day and night, dancing and partying being among the prime activities. Not wanting to waste any Carnival time for meals, we locals opt for Brazilian snacks as a good and extremely rewarding solution. Brazilian snacks are the best - a unique fusion of the European food of the colonial Portuguese with palmito (hearts of palm)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 17, 2007
I may not be able to bench-press 300 pounds. I may not grasp the subtleties of the international balance of payments. But I can flip a frittata. When I tossed one out of the skillet recently, it was a personal culinary milestone. It was also supper. I am a latecomer to the frittata, which is the Italian version of the omelet. The one my wife and I made for supper the other night, loaded with pieces of Italian sausage, fresh herbs and garden tomatoes, has sold me on the concept. I enjoy an occasional omelet, but it is eggy, soupy and French.
FEATURES
By VERA CALABRIA and VERA CALABRIA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 25, 2006
Growing up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, I learned early how to cope with the stresses of our annual crazy, eccentric Carnival, which this year began yesterday, and ends Tuesday, the dawning of Lent. The secrets to surviving Carnival are to stay hydrated and to eat just enough to keep going day and night, dancing and partying being among the prime activities. Not wanting to waste any Carnival time for meals, we locals opt for Brazilian snacks as a good and extremely rewarding solution. Brazilian snacks are the best - a unique fusion of the European food of the colonial Portuguese with palmito (hearts of palm)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2005
Orioles VP Lou Kousouris had a fast one pulled on him at last week's annual Salvation Army luncheon -- on his own turf, no less. Lou was among those attending the "Compassion in Action Luncheon & Silent Auction" in the sixth-floor banquet room at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. This year, the event was honoring poultry point man Jim Perdue and WBAL-TV head honcho Bill Fine. At least, that's what Lou thought. But Maj. Jim Arrowood, the Baltimore-area commander of the Salvation Army, knew otherwise.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | December 29, 2004
This is the season to fight the chilly weather with hot soups, braised meats and warm desserts. Diane Rossen Worthington, author of 14 cookbooks including The Taste of Summer, explores the dishes of fall and winter in her new book, The Taste of the Season (Chronicle Books, 2004, $24.95). Her goal, she says, is to follow up on her summer book with a book that celebrates the cool months through dishes that feature seasonal produce and could be served at the holiday table. Among the 75 or so recipes are Winter Frittata, which can be assembled in advance and served for a holiday brunch; Spicy Chicken Gumbo, which is perfect for a Super Bowl celebration; and a comforting Turkey Potpie with a Puff Pastry Crust, which would be a fine dinner to serve on a snowy evening.
NEWS
By Donna Crivello and Donna Crivello,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2002
When I was in my early teens and just becoming more aware of the different foods outside my home, I wondered why my mother never folded over her omelets. I would watch her slide the almost-cooked, eggy, plate-sized disk onto a bigger plate, then slip it back into the pan to cook it on the other side. At other times, she would finish cooking it with a lid or under the broiler. This was a frittata, an Italian omelet that has cheese and vegetables mixed in with the eggs and is "baked" in the pan. It is slightly firmer than the classic French omelet because it is cooked slowly over a lower heat and its center finishes last.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | May 28, 1997
Mediterranean diets have always included eggs, and Mediterranean cooks from Spain to Turkey have added their own regional stamp. But eggs have taken a beating in this country, due to concern about heart disease.Now, though, as blame has shifted away from dietary cholesterol to saturated fat, eggs are poised for a comeback. A tremendous source of nutrition, one large egg contains about 5 grams of fat, less than 2 of them saturated. It has 6 grams of protein and an array of vitamins and minerals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2005
Orioles VP Lou Kousouris had a fast one pulled on him at last week's annual Salvation Army luncheon -- on his own turf, no less. Lou was among those attending the "Compassion in Action Luncheon & Silent Auction" in the sixth-floor banquet room at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. This year, the event was honoring poultry point man Jim Perdue and WBAL-TV head honcho Bill Fine. At least, that's what Lou thought. But Maj. Jim Arrowood, the Baltimore-area commander of the Salvation Army, knew otherwise.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 25, 1996
Brunch is an ideal format for connecting with the family or entertaining during the party-dense holiday season.To make the early hours of the day less stressful, it helps to plan a simple menu that includes at least one recipe that can be made ahead of time.Few people understand the dynamics of brunch better than those who operate bed-and-breakfasts. A recent contest sponsored by Jones Dairy Farm and open to members of the American Bed & Breakfast Association gathered more than 400 entries.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 25, 1996
Brunch is an ideal format for connecting with the family or entertaining during the party-dense holiday season.To make the early hours of the day less stressful, it helps to plan a simple menu that includes at least one recipe that can be made ahead of time.Few people understand the dynamics of brunch better than those who operate bed-and-breakfasts. A recent contest sponsored by Jones Dairy Farm and open to members of the American Bed & Breakfast Association gathered more than 400 entries.
FEATURES
By Irene Sax and Irene Sax,LOS ANGELES TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1996
I'm sick of stodge. I'm tired of stew, and of mashed potatoes, and of what food writers like to call "elemental" soups. I'm ready to eat something fresh.But even though temperatures are rising and spring seems a possibility, fresh food -- really fresh, not flown from another hemisphere -- is months away. And so I turn to parsley, an old friend that tastes like everything that's fresh and green in the world.Once, parsley was the only fresh herb I could find in winter, and it was always curly parsley.
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