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NEWS
July 21, 1997
Ten employees of the Frito-Lay Inc. plant in Aberdeen suffered eye irritation and scratchy throats during the weekend after a container holding nitric and phosphoric acids ruptured, Harford County officials said yesterday.The employees were mixing the acids with water to clean equipment.Nine workers were treated at local hospitals and one declined medical treatment, said Larry A. Mabe of the Harford County Emergency Operations Center.Pub Date: 7/21/97
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Lyndon Anthony Wilkinson, a warehouse worker and avid football fan, died of complications from sarcoidosis Oct. 17 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Joppatowne resident was 30. Born in Wichita, Kan., he was the son of Ezra Wilkinson, an electrician and union member, and Gene Archer Wilkinson, a radiologic technician. He grew up in Essex and attended Sandalwood Elementary and Deep Creek Middle schools and was a 2001 graduate of Joppatowne High School, where he played basketball.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
Three weeks after vowing to send hundreds of new jobs to other states, officials with Frito-Lay Inc. said yesterday that they will instead expand their Harford County plant and add the positions there.The company decided to proceed with the expansion after the governor and key state legislators promised to seek repeal next year of Maryland's sales tax on salty snack foods.The General Assembly failed to eliminate the tax when it ended its 1995 session last month, and a day later, an irritated Frito-Lay executive said the snack food manufacturer would scrap plans to expand in Maryland.
NEWS
January 26, 2006
On January 23, 2006 JAMES ANDRE LEWIS beloved husband of Sybil Mc Cain Lewis; devoted father of Caira and Tyra Lewis; loving son of Josephine Lewis. He is also survived by a host of other relatives and friends. Mr. Lewis is an alumni of Tuskegee University and a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. He was an Operations Manager for Frito-Lay Corp. and a Major in the US Army Reserve. On Saturday, services will be held at Bethlehem Baptist Church, 799 Dummit Avenue, Titusville, FL. Inquiries to Lewis-Ray Mortuary 321-269-5811.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | May 21, 1991
It's snack time in America.Because of a boom in East Coasters' appetite for corn chips, popcorn and pretzels, the world's biggest snack-food maker announced yesterday that it would build a plant in Aberdeen.Frito-Lay Inc. said it plans to start construction during the summer on a plant that will employ 300 workers by 1992 and may eventually have a work force of 500.To persuade Frito-Lay to build its first plant in Maryland, the state agreed to give Harford County a $500,000 grant to improve its sewer system and to provide up to $100,000 for training for the plant's workers, said Marilyn Corbett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | May 20, 1991
Frito-Lay, Pepsico Inc.'s snack food division, plans to build a major manufacturing and distribution plant in Aberdeen.The new plant would add as many as 500 jobs, company officials said today."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
At the urging of the Harford County delegation, the House Ways and Means Committee has eliminated a 5 percent snack tax from its proposed budget bill. The tax, which would have generated an estimated $16 million a year in revenue, was a major concern of Harford officials, including County Executive James M. Harkins, who said it represented a major threat to a possible expansion of the Frito-Lay Inc. plant in Aberdeen. With 418 workers, Frito-Lay is Harford County's largest manufacturing employer.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Frito-Lay Inc. says Maryland's new tax on snack foods won't delay the opening of its Aberdeen manufacturing plant, but the tax may force the company to hire fewer workers for it.Robbi Dietrich, director of government affairs for Frito-Lay, based in Plano, Texas, said it might employ fewer people than originally planned if sales are "dramatically" affected."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
Harford County delegates to the General Assembly are rallying their forces to block passage of a proposed 5 percent sales tax on snack foods that county officials say would threaten the future expansion of the Frito-Lay Inc. plant in Aberdeen. With 418 workers, Frito-Lay is the county's largest manufacturing employer and a major contributor to the county's fast-growing economic base. Lynn Markley, a spokeswoman for Frito-Lay, which is based in Plano, Texas, said the company is not speculating on its plans but added, "A snack-food tax would certainly hinder any type of expansion" in Maryland.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
Harford's reputation for rolling out the red carpet to help select businesses begin operations here was a key factor in Frito-Lay Inc.'s decision to build a new plant in Aberdeen, company and county officials say."We are looking to be operational by mid-1992 -- that's in10 or 12 months," said Stacy Wehr, a spokeswoman for Plano, Texas-based Frito-Lay."So we were looking for a site that had a number of elements in place, but which could give us quick accessibility to building plan approvals and inspections.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
While most other big cities put national potato chip retailer Lay's at the top of their favorite list, Baltimoreans remain loyal to their regional brand. Utz leads locally with $28 million in supermarket sales in the Baltimore-Washington area, leaving Lay's in second place with $11 million, according to a Chicago company that studies food trends. Utz, produced in Hanover, Pa., is among such local favorites as Esskay bacon and Berger Cookies. And in this region, the chip has long been able to outsell Lay's potato chips, the national brand of behemoth Frito-Lay Inc. Lay's has successfully dominated the chip market in other cities throughout the country.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
At the urging of the Harford County delegation, the House Ways and Means Committee has eliminated a 5 percent snack tax from its proposed budget bill. The tax, which would have generated an estimated $16 million a year in revenue, was a major concern of Harford officials, including County Executive James M. Harkins, who said it represented a major threat to a possible expansion of the Frito-Lay Inc. plant in Aberdeen. With 418 workers, Frito-Lay is Harford County's largest manufacturing employer.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
Harford County delegates to the General Assembly are rallying their forces to block passage of a proposed 5 percent sales tax on snack foods that county officials say would threaten the future expansion of the Frito-Lay Inc. plant in Aberdeen. With 418 workers, Frito-Lay is the county's largest manufacturing employer and a major contributor to the county's fast-growing economic base. Lynn Markley, a spokeswoman for Frito-Lay, which is based in Plano, Texas, said the company is not speculating on its plans but added, "A snack-food tax would certainly hinder any type of expansion" in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
The potato-chip maker that bet its customers they couldn't "eat just one" now is trying to appeal to customer fears of being fat. In response to growing concerns about obesity, Frito-Lay Inc. is trumpeting a new, healthier chip that lacks trans fat, dubbed the "bad fat" by nutritionists. The Plano, Texas-based company is cooking its Lay's potato chips, Doritos, Fritos, Ruffles, Tostitos and Cheetos in oils that contain no trans fats. It began marketing the change this week in full-page advertisements in dozens of major newspapers and Hispanic publications.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
The latest battle in the Great Cola Wars is being fought over chips -- specifically the ability of Utz Quality Foods Inc. to sell and market snacks at the University of Maryland, College Park.Hanover, Pa.,-based Utz is challenging a Dec. 17 university contract giving PepsiCo Inc. and its subsidiary, Frito-Lay, nearly exclusive 15-year "pouring rights" to sell beverages and snacks in campus convenience stores, dining halls and vending machines. Utz has also filed a lawsuit in Prince George's County Circuit Court charging the university with interfering with its advertisements by removing Utz signs from campus sports arenas.
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