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By Molly Knight | October 24, 2002
For most kids, Halloween is all about fun. But for some children - especially younger ones - it can also be frightening. That's why the Catonsville Branch Library is inviting kids ages 2 to 6 to celebrate the coming holiday with "not-so-scary stories" - tales that highlight Halloween fun instead of fear. Next week, the library will present two events called "Halloween Stories for Wee Folks." According to librarian Rodney Campbell, the stories will be fun and lighthearted. "We won't read the kind of stories that would appeal to older kids," he says.
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NEWS
September 27, 2014
Commentator René Muller asserts that suicide is "an uncommon phenomenon" ( "Explaining the inexplicable: suicide," Sept. 23). Yet The most recent suicide data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control, in 2011, lists suicide as the 10th leading cause of death for Americans - a reported 39,518 people took their own lives that year. I say reported because death by suicide is under-reported for a variety of reasons - social stigma, religious and insurance concerns, and the difficulty in determining cause of death.
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NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
Saying the state of justice in Baltimore is "frightening," Maryland's chief judge has renewed his call for a state takeover of the circuit courts."I've talked about this until I'm blue in the face," Chief Judge Robert C. Murphy of the Court of Appeals said in an interview this week. "There's a reluctance to do anything more than they have been doing. [Legislators] have more demanding political concerns. Take welfare, for example. Sewage. Sanitation. Stop signs.""But we have an absolute crisis situation in the courts," he added.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 17, 2014
Given that some sort of horrific, headline-grabbing school shooting now occurs in the United States at a rate of once a week, it's hard to argue against the idea that gun violence is as much a national pastime as baseball. Unlike baseball, however, the season never ends. In just the last couple of weeks, troubled loners brought guns and death to a college campus in Seattle and a high school near Portland, and a couple of anti-government misfits went on a deadly rampage in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER | April 2, 2008
Surrounded by potted plants and photographs of grandchildren in her sunny living room, Ruth Stewart seems an unlikely participant in the looting that took place 40 years ago. Now 62, the retired teacher's aide says that the riots were wrought by the anguish and anger people felt after the King assassination on April 4, 1968. As the mother of two young children, Stewart made survival her first priority. "When they killed Martin Luther King, that did it," she says. "The peace just went.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 28, 2001
There's very little I don't like about Denzel Washington. But last week, when I emerged from seeing his latest thriller, Training Day, I felt bruised. Washington plays a rotten-to-the-core policeman whose lack of morals and brutality are exceeded only by his ability to rationalize them. As his character tells a rookie narcotics detective, played by Ethan Hawke: "You have to decide if you're a sheep or a wolf; if you want to go to the grave or if you want to go home." The movie, with its high-powered stars and shoot-'em-up plot, was undoubtedly designed to be a blockbuster adventure film, not out-and-out scary.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilsonand Dr. Alain Joffe | January 29, 1991
Q: My 6-year-old wakes up at night saying he hears monster and ghosts in his room and ends up sleeping in our bed. I've tried to help him get rid of the monsters without success. I want to get him out of our bedroom. Any ideas?A: Nighttime fears are a common childhood problem. We agree sleeping in the parents' room is not a good, long-term solution. Your son's fears of monsters and ghosts are normal at this age, but they are not rational. Therefore, reasoning will not expel them.There are a number of things you can do to help.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 4, 1998
ARE YOU wise to buy stock in the company you work for? "You're better able to answer that question than most securities analysts," says Working Woman. "For clues, talk to outsiders who know the company well, evaluate your firm's product line, ask your broker for company research reports, size up management and monitor morale."Plan to borrow from your 401(k)? "It's risky," says Ted Benna, president of the 401(k) Association. "If you quit, retire or are laid off, 401(k) rules require that any loan balance be paid back immediately.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 31, 1998
AFTER THE SMALL fry get done today -- trolling the neighborhood dressed in their cute little costumes and begging for goodies -- you might be inclined to ask yourself: "What's in this Halloween thing for me?"Adults are left to feast on a plethora of horror movies. Television serves them up throughout the month of October. For old-timers those of us over 40 -- television is the best bet. Current films offer nothing for fans of the horror movie genre.Look at what Hollywood gives us. One theme repeated at least a half-dozen times.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek | July 16, 2002
In the wake of the stock market's latest frightening - albeit temporary - nose dive, now might be a good time to reflect on the true meaning of stocks. The following definitions, all listed by either Webster's or American Heritage dictionary, may help provide some insight: 1. A device consisting of a heavy timber frame with holes for confining the ankles and wrists, formerly used for punishment. 2. The broth in which meat, fish, bones or vegetables are simmered for a long period, used as a base in preparing soup, gravy or sauces.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
What a dreadful experience for the Stevenson University students who were robbed in South Africa ( "Stevenson students return after being robbed in South Africa," May 14). They were lucky former Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III was on the bus. Even though he and the other chaperon considered grabbing the robber's weapons, they refrained. Others might not have, and by grabbing a weapon, the kids could have been badly injured or killed. The story horrified me because a similar incident happened to a family member during a college-sponsored trip to an African country.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
When temperatures sizzled last week, life did not slow down in Roland Park. Activity proceeded, some constructive, some not. In the department of the unconstructive, daytime robberies in Roland Park were reported. Emails and Facebook postings gave news of two break-ins on Wednesday, July 17. According to one email, a Woodlawn Road house was robbed after 1:15 p.m.  The son of the owners came home about 2:45 p.m. and found the front door ajar. It had been pried open with a crowbar.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
The U.S. Department of State is committing to fighting homophobia and is looking for new ways it can protect the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens in countries around the world, including within the United States, Secretary John Kerry said during a "Pride at State" event held Wednesday. Kerry also said his agency is actively preparing for the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act, which prohibits federal recognition of same-sex marriages.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A power outage darkened the Superdome in the third quarter of the Super Bowl on Sunday night, an unnerving experience for a stadium that had been the refuge of last resort for many when Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005. The 34-minute outage seemed to halt the Ravens' momentum, coming almost immediately after Jacoby Jones returned a kickoff for a touchdown to start the second half. The Ravens had led 28-6, but the previously sluggish San Francisco 49ers went on to score two touchdowns and a field goal in the third quarter.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | September 5, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education released Wednesday the results of a state-wide survey of  showing that motorists continue to bypass stop arms on school buses--the signs that swing out and flash when a bus stops to board students--at a "frightening rate. " A survey of roughly 63 percent of Maryland bus drivers noted 4,657 violations in April, according to a release from the department, which sponsored the survey at the recommendation of several members of the Maryland General Assembly.  In 2011, the number of violations reported was 7,000, recorded by about 65 percent of the state's bus drivers.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
With new talk that convicted child rapist John Joseph Merzbacher could regain his freedom because defense attorneys failed to disclose a plea offer back in the 1990s, let's take a moment to review the sordid history of this case. The Sun's Tricia Bishop reports on a petition drive to keep the now 70-year-old behind bars. TwoU.S. Supreme Court cases decided this week have bolstered Merzbacher's claims that he was wronged. Had he known about the plea deal, he says, he might've taken it and would already have served the 10 years put on the table.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
With images of yesterday's frightening attacks saturating the media, parents today face a daunting task: How to explain these events to their children. Two leading child psychiatrists say parents should be open and honest, but offer only as much information as a child is old enough - and mature enough - to handle and then leave the door open to questions if the child wants to know more. Dr. Richard M. Sarles, professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at University of Maryland Medical Center, and Dr. Paramjit T. Joshi, chair of the psychiatry department at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, say the most important message a parent can offer right now is one of love and reassurance.
NEWS
March 12, 1999
Change in tort law would add to the load of clogged courtsAs highlighted in recent articles in The Sun, Baltimore courts have an overcrowding crisis that led to the dismissals of several serious criminal cases. I commend Gov. Parris N. Glendening and the other public officials who are working to add courtrooms, prosecutors and public offenders.Now is not the time to pass bills that would increase the burden on Baltimore's Circuit Court. But a bill in the House that would adopt "comparative fault," a legal liability system to replace Maryland's "contributory negligence" rule -- which has been in effect for more than 150 years -- would do just that.
NEWS
October 21, 2011
Commentator Bishop Harry R. Jackson Jr.'s arguments in favor of shale oil drilling are deeply flawed ("Fracking: Don't let fear hold us back," Oct. 12). After a summer of record flooding, we are entitled to a healthy fear of what gets flushed from old wells, industrial sites and waste water holding pits. More to the point, hydraulic fracturing to extract shale oil and gas is a frightening health threat. Dr. Walter Tsou, past president of the American Public Health Association, told the Philadelphia City Council that "politicians have explicitly avoided the public health question because if they were really confronted with it, they would stop hydraulic fracturing.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge on Tuesday granted a trial postponement to a man charged with leaving a device that police said appeared to be a bomb — a toilet equipped with electric gadgets — outside an administration building in February. Duane G. Davis, 51, whose trial was to have begun Tuesday, dismissed his lawyer and asked for the postponement so that he would have time to prepare for trial with another attorney or, failing that, to represent himself. A new trial was set for Sept.
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