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By Sandy Banisky | September 17, 1991
So maybe the Constellation, floating regally in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, isn't the 1797 frigate its defenders believe it to be. Maybe it's an 1854 sloop-of-war, a corvette, built as the old Constellation was being dismantled and christened with the same name. So what?"It's still a great thing to have," said Dana Wegner, the naval historian who last week delivered a research paper positing that the ship was not really the oldest U.S. warship continuously afloat. "It's wonderful."In fact, it might be an even more interesting ship than the Constellation's fans know, Mr. Wegner said.
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NEWS
May 19, 2005
The frigate HNLMS Tromp of the Royal Netherlands Navy will dock at the Broadway Pier in Fells Point starting today. The warship is scheduled to arrive in Fells Point at 9 a.m. today. The public is invited to a welcome ceremony alongside the ship at 11:30 a.m. Tours are available from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The ship will depart for Norfolk, Va., on Wednesday. Its visit is sponsored by Sail Baltimore.
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NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | October 2, 1994
A visit to the dim, claustrophobic lower decks of the Constellation these days bears more than a slight resemblance to spelunking.Long after the rain stops, water seeps down through the planks of the spar deck and drips into puddles on the gun deck.Creep down another steep ladder to the berth deck, and you can see that the low beams are supported by stout shoring; knees and walls are badly water-stained, broken and decayed. The crew quarters are jammed with old rigging, tools and lumber, and the whole place smells dank and musty.
NEWS
October 25, 2004
Vice Adm. Samuel Gravely Jr., 83, the first black commander of a Navy ship and the first black to attain the rank of admiral, died Friday at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda after a stroke. Admiral Gravely, a Richmond, Va., native, began his 38-year Navy career as a fireman apprentice and in the 1960s became acting commanding officer of the destroyer USS Theodore E. Chandler. During the Vietnam War he commanded the destroyer USS Taussig and the guided-missile frigate USS Jouett.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
As an ancient coin ritual was enacted on the deck of the dry-docked USS Constellation yesterday, the past and future suddenly became clearer.Now it's official: The wooden vessel in the Fort McHenry shipyard is indeed the one built in 1854 by the Navy as its last ship under sail.And it is definitely not the frigate Constellation built in Baltimore in 1797 as part of the original six-ship navy."There's no doubt about it, because we've surveyed the shape of the hull," said Peter Boudreau, restoration project manager for the Constellation Foundation.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
Hoping to win over maritime purists and reluctant potential donors, the U.S.F. Constellation Foundation has formally dumped the "U.S.F." -- for United States Frigate -- from its name.The name change signals an end to more than 40 years of alterations to the ship and now-discredited historical research designed by the ship's former promoters to portray the vessel as a frigate built in 1797.The foundation's recently reconstituted board has committed itself instead to restoring and presenting the ship on much sounder historical grounds -- as a sloop-of-war built in 1854, the last all-sail warship built for the Navy and the only one surviving from the Civil War era."
NEWS
October 25, 2004
Vice Adm. Samuel Gravely Jr., 83, the first black commander of a Navy ship and the first black to attain the rank of admiral, died Friday at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda after a stroke. Admiral Gravely, a Richmond, Va., native, began his 38-year Navy career as a fireman apprentice and in the 1960s became acting commanding officer of the destroyer USS Theodore E. Chandler. During the Vietnam War he commanded the destroyer USS Taussig and the guided-missile frigate USS Jouett.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
The frigate HNLMS Tromp of the Royal Netherlands Navy will dock at the Broadway Pier in Fells Point starting today. The warship is scheduled to arrive in Fells Point at 9 a.m. today. The public is invited to a welcome ceremony alongside the ship at 11:30 a.m. Tours are available from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The ship will depart for Norfolk, Va., on Wednesday. Its visit is sponsored by Sail Baltimore.
NEWS
May 30, 1994
Whether the USF Constellation, moored off Pratt Street these days, is the same frigate that was built here in 1797 or an 1853 reconstruction is immaterial. In the past 25 years, this old ship has become an important visual symbol of the city's rebirth and Inner Harbor renewal. For that reason, news that the Constellation is badly rotted and in need of expensive repairs is alarming.Thanks to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Gail Shawe, a community-wide campaign is now under way to save the Constellation, the first ship commissioned in the U.S. Navy.
FEATURES
June 1, 2000
Today in history: June 1 In 1801, Mormon leader Brigham Young was born in Whitingham, Vt. In 1813, the commander of the U.S. frigate Chesapeake, Capt. James Lawrence, said, "Don't give up the ship" during a losing battle with a British frigate. In 1926, actress Marilyn Monroe was born in Los Angeles. In 1943, a civilian flight from Lisbon to London was shot down by the Germans during World War II, killing all aboard, including actor Leslie Howard. In 1958, Charles de Gaulle became premier of France.
FEATURES
June 1, 2000
Today in history: June 1 In 1801, Mormon leader Brigham Young was born in Whitingham, Vt. In 1813, the commander of the U.S. frigate Chesapeake, Capt. James Lawrence, said, "Don't give up the ship" during a losing battle with a British frigate. In 1926, actress Marilyn Monroe was born in Los Angeles. In 1943, a civilian flight from Lisbon to London was shot down by the Germans during World War II, killing all aboard, including actor Leslie Howard. In 1958, Charles de Gaulle became premier of France.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
In what could signal a steady stream of new work for hundreds of Sparrows Point shipyard employees, Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. has received its first vessel to be dismantled.In its final passage, the frigate USS Patterson arrived at the shipyard about midnight Thursday from Philadelphia after being towed by a tug through the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal.Baltimore Marine won a $3.8 million Navy contract in September to scrap the ship. Work is expected to begin Monday.The contract means work for 200 employees for about seven months.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | July 2, 1999
When the old warship Constellation returns to Baltimore's Inner Harbor today, its flags and pennants flying, it will be greeted by cannon, the roar of Navy jets and a huge sigh of relief. "There were a lot of people who thought this would never happen," said Gail Shawe, chairwoman of the Constellation Foundation, who led the ship's rescue. The 145-year-old sloop of war -- a veteran of the Civil War and anti-slavery patrols off West Africa -- has just completed a 30-month restoration that cost $7.3 million.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
As an ancient coin ritual was enacted on the deck of the dry-docked USS Constellation yesterday, the past and future suddenly became clearer.Now it's official: The wooden vessel in the Fort McHenry shipyard is indeed the one built in 1854 by the Navy as its last ship under sail.And it is definitely not the frigate Constellation built in Baltimore in 1797 as part of the original six-ship navy."There's no doubt about it, because we've surveyed the shape of the hull," said Peter Boudreau, restoration project manager for the Constellation Foundation.
NEWS
By Claudia Moessinger and Claudia Moessinger,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 11, 1996
The first step toward restoration of the aging USS Constellation, the historic showpiece of the Inner Harbor, happened underwater yesterday.As a nurse dresses the wounds of a patient, diver Martin Sadowski applied a skin of rubber to stop the Civil War vessel's leaks and prepare it for towing to the Fort McHenry dock, where it will remain during repairs.Ship keeper Rick McDonough guided as Sadowski hammered the 3-foot-wide sections of roofing material to the ship's hull over hTC a layer of marine life -- mussels, mostly.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
What would we rather have as the centerpiece of the Inner Harbor, a rebuilt replica of an 18th century frigate questionably posing as the real thing, or an authentic restoration of a Civil War sloop, the last all-sail warship built for the U.S. Navy? The choice is easy, and the new leadership of the Constellation Foundation has made the right one.No longer will the fate of the hallowed vessel depend on its increasingly threadbare claim to have been built here in 1797. If it is to be saved, the Constellation will be presented as an honest artifact of this nation's, and Maryland's, great maritime tradition.
NEWS
By Claudia Moessinger and Claudia Moessinger,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 11, 1996
The first step toward restoration of the aging USS Constellation, the historic showpiece of the Inner Harbor, happened underwater yesterday.As a nurse dresses the wounds of a patient, diver Martin Sadowski applied a skin of rubber to stop the Civil War vessel's leaks and prepare it for towing to the Fort McHenry dock, where it will remain during repairs.Ship keeper Rick McDonough guided as Sadowski hammered the 3-foot-wide sections of roofing material to the ship's hull over hTC a layer of marine life -- mussels, mostly.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, based in Washington, announced yesterday that it will contribute $5,000 in "seed money" for restoration of the Constellation."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
Hoping to win over maritime purists and reluctant potential donors, the U.S.F. Constellation Foundation has formally dumped the "U.S.F." -- for United States Frigate -- from its name.The name change signals an end to more than 40 years of alterations to the ship and now-discredited historical research designed by the ship's former promoters to portray the vessel as a frigate built in 1797.The foundation's recently reconstituted board has committed itself instead to restoring and presenting the ship on much sounder historical grounds -- as a sloop-of-war built in 1854, the last all-sail warship built for the Navy and the only one surviving from the Civil War era."
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | October 2, 1994
A visit to the dim, claustrophobic lower decks of the Constellation these days bears more than a slight resemblance to spelunking.Long after the rain stops, water seeps down through the planks of the spar deck and drips into puddles on the gun deck.Creep down another steep ladder to the berth deck, and you can see that the low beams are supported by stout shoring; knees and walls are badly water-stained, broken and decayed. The crew quarters are jammed with old rigging, tools and lumber, and the whole place smells dank and musty.
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