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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1995
CUMBERLAND -- Friendsville Mayor Spencer Schlosnagle has pleaded guilty to one count of indecent exposure stemming from a complaint by a driver on Interstate 68 near LaVale in May.Schlosnagle, 31, a five-term mayor of the small town in western Garrett County, could be sentenced to as much as one year in prison as part of a plea agreement he accepted Monday before Allegany County Circuit Judge J. Frederick Sharer. A sentencing date has not been set.As part of the plea agreement, another indecent exposure charge -- stemming from an incident along Interstate 68 in July 1994 -- was dropped.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Richard Irwin and Brent Jones and Richard Irwin,Sun reporters | July 31, 2008
A storm packing heavy winds and rain struck two Western Maryland communities yesterday evening, causing an undetermined number of power outages and downed trees, state police in Garrett County said. At least 15 houses in Accident and Friendsville, in the northwestern part of the county, were damaged, but no injuries were reported, police said. The National Weather Service in Pittsburgh said officials would survey the area today to determine whether a tornado touched down. Meteorologist Rich Cain said he had received reports of funnel cloud sightings in Preston County, W.Va.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | April 10, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- Mention this small town hard against the Youghiogheny River just about anywhere in the Western Maryland mountains, and you'll likely hear about its five-term mayor, Spencer R. Schlosnagle.You'll hear about the motel desk-clerk, now 30, who at 21 became the youngest person ever elected mayor anywhere in Maryland. You'll hear about a man who boosted the Garrett County town's self-esteem with a little sprucing up and by pushing paper to capture nearly $2 million in grants for water and sewer system renovations and a river-front park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 16, 1998
Scottish, Irish FairThe first Mid-Summer Scottish and Irish Music Festival and Fair is coming to the Valley Forge Convention Center in King of Prussia, Pa., Saturday and Sunday . Top Irish and Scottish performers including Seven Nations, Black 47, Men of Worth, Bur, Whelan & O'Riordan and Donna Missigman, will highlight this weekend's event. More than 30 craft exhibitors and vendors will be open for business, and bagpipers, Irish step dancers and Scottish Highland dance groups will perform continuously.
FEATURES
By GREG TASKER | May 28, 1995
From high above -- on a highway crossing the mountains of Western Maryland -- Friendsville appears in the green valley below as an enticing village along a bend in the river.This picturesque view has lured many passing motorists off Interstate 68, down the mountain and across the Youghiogheny River into the "friendliest little town in Maryland."Not so long ago, though, Friendsville was "an end-of-the-road kind of place," as some locals say -- the last stop off the westbound highway before West Virginia.
NEWS
March 8, 1995
MOST people feel they don't see enough of their elected officials. They complain that they never really get to see into their private lifes.The people of Friendsville can't say that. In fact, the people of Friendsville may be seeing a little too much of their elected officials, the mayor in particular.Spencer R. Schlosnagle, mayor of this small Garrett County town, now has a third conviction for indecent exposure after a plea bargain in which he pleaded guilty to exposing himself to a fellow driver on Interstate 68. A second, similar charge was dismissed.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Richard Irwin and Brent Jones and Richard Irwin,Sun reporters | July 31, 2008
A storm packing heavy winds and rain struck two Western Maryland communities yesterday evening, causing an undetermined number of power outages and downed trees, state police in Garrett County said. At least 15 houses in Accident and Friendsville, in the northwestern part of the county, were damaged, but no injuries were reported, police said. The National Weather Service in Pittsburgh said officials would survey the area today to determine whether a tornado touched down. Meteorologist Rich Cain said he had received reports of funnel cloud sightings in Preston County, W.Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 16, 1998
Scottish, Irish FairThe first Mid-Summer Scottish and Irish Music Festival and Fair is coming to the Valley Forge Convention Center in King of Prussia, Pa., Saturday and Sunday . Top Irish and Scottish performers including Seven Nations, Black 47, Men of Worth, Bur, Whelan & O'Riordan and Donna Missigman, will highlight this weekend's event. More than 30 craft exhibitors and vendors will be open for business, and bagpipers, Irish step dancers and Scottish Highland dance groups will perform continuously.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
FRIENDSVILLE -- In the mountains of far Western Maryland and across Appalachia, there are two kinds of people: those who eat ramps and those who don't.For 11 months of the year, it isn't much of an issue. But come the first breath of spring -- and for ramp-eaters it is bad breath -- the camps divide."Don't! Don't eat ramps!" a waitress at Point View Inn on Deep Creek Lake warns. "They come through your pores for two days. You'll be sorry."Eat a "good gorge of ramps," and "it does something to your blood," says Marlin Lawson of Friendsville.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
FRIENDSVILLE -- Having survived the terrors of boiling rapids nicknamed the Meat Cleaver and the Powerful Pop-up, not to mention two spills into a river refrigerator cold, Bob Anderson could hardly wipe the smile from his face.Maybe it was the sheer joy of survival -- dodging boulders, keeping balance on a twisting rubber raft and paddling so hard his arms burned as if from a liniment bath. With the help of two friends and a guide, he had braved an adventurous ride down Maryland's Youghiogheny River, and it felt good.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
FRIENDSVILLE -- Having survived the terrors of boiling rapids nicknamed the Meat Cleaver and the Powerful Pop-up, not to mention two spills into a river refrigerator cold, Bob Anderson could hardly wipe the smile from his face.Maybe it was the sheer joy of survival -- dodging boulders, keeping balance on a twisting rubber raft and paddling so hard his arms burned as if from a liniment bath. With the help of two friends and a guide, he had braved an adventurous ride down Maryland's Youghiogheny River, and it felt good.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1997
FRIENDSVILLE -- In the mountains of far Western Maryland and across Appalachia, there are two kinds of people: those who eat ramps and those who don't.For 11 months of the year, it isn't much of an issue. But come the first breath of spring -- and for ramp-eaters it is bad breath -- the camps divide."Don't! Don't eat ramps!" a waitress at Point View Inn on Deep Creek Lake warns. "They come through your pores for two days. You'll be sorry."Eat a "good gorge of ramps," and "it does something to your blood," says Marlin Lawson of Friendsville.
FEATURES
By GREG TASKER | May 28, 1995
From high above -- on a highway crossing the mountains of Western Maryland -- Friendsville appears in the green valley below as an enticing village along a bend in the river.This picturesque view has lured many passing motorists off Interstate 68, down the mountain and across the Youghiogheny River into the "friendliest little town in Maryland."Not so long ago, though, Friendsville was "an end-of-the-road kind of place," as some locals say -- the last stop off the westbound highway before West Virginia.
NEWS
March 8, 1995
MOST people feel they don't see enough of their elected officials. They complain that they never really get to see into their private lifes.The people of Friendsville can't say that. In fact, the people of Friendsville may be seeing a little too much of their elected officials, the mayor in particular.Spencer R. Schlosnagle, mayor of this small Garrett County town, now has a third conviction for indecent exposure after a plea bargain in which he pleaded guilty to exposing himself to a fellow driver on Interstate 68. A second, similar charge was dismissed.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1995
CUMBERLAND -- Friendsville Mayor Spencer Schlosnagle has pleaded guilty to one count of indecent exposure stemming from a complaint by a driver on Interstate 68 near LaVale in May.Schlosnagle, 31, a five-term mayor of the small town in western Garrett County, could be sentenced to as much as one year in prison as part of a plea agreement he accepted Monday before Allegany County Circuit Judge J. Frederick Sharer. A sentencing date has not been set.As part of the plea agreement, another indecent exposure charge -- stemming from an incident along Interstate 68 in July 1994 -- was dropped.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- Twenty men and women, some with feathers dangling from coal-black hair, some with moccasins as footwear, step purposefully in a circle around a barren pole they say reaches to the sky.In pairs, they walk in cadence with the rhythmic beating of a drum, oblivious to the panoramic views the lofty pasture affords them of the surrounding forested mountains -- exploding in brilliant hues of red and yellow -- and the river valley below.From distant vantage points in the ridges that fortress the Youghiogheny River, these conspicuous people might lead you to believe you've slipped into another century, when the Shawnees roamed these parts, hunting and fishing.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- Twenty men and women, some with feathers dangling from coal-black hair, some with moccasins as footwear, step purposefully in a circle around a barren pole they say reaches to the sky.In pairs, they walk in cadence with the rhythmic beating of a drum, oblivious to the panoramic views the lofty pasture affords them of the surrounding forested mountains -- exploding in brilliant hues of red and yellow -- and the river valley below.From distant vantage points in the ridges that fortress the Youghiogheny River, these conspicuous people might lead you to believe you've slipped into another century, when the Shawnees roamed these parts, hunting and fishing.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- In the rugged mountains of Western Maryland, the woods are deep enough to hide most anything -- even a ghost cat.Once upon a time, cougars ruled the forest of oak and evergreen, carving a reputation as sleek and silent hunters that rarely emerged from the shadows.Alas, the secretive predators were chased away by settlers and loggers. By the turn of the century, the ghost cat was receding into legend.Though the species has survived in the Western United States and in Florida, the Eastern cougar, Felis concolor, officially is no more in Maryland.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- In the rugged mountains of Western Maryland, the woods are deep enough to hide most anything -- even a ghost cat.Once upon a time, cougars ruled the forest of oak and evergreen, carving a reputation as sleek and silent hunters that rarely emerged from the shadows.Alas, the secretive predators were chased away by settlers and loggers. By the turn of the century, the ghost cat was receding into legend.Though the species has survived in the Western United States and in Florida, the Eastern cougar, Felis concolor, officially is no more in Maryland.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | April 10, 1994
FRIENDSVILLE -- Mention this small town hard against the Youghiogheny River just about anywhere in the Western Maryland mountains, and you'll likely hear about its five-term mayor, Spencer R. Schlosnagle.You'll hear about the motel desk-clerk, now 30, who at 21 became the youngest person ever elected mayor anywhere in Maryland. You'll hear about a man who boosted the Garrett County town's self-esteem with a little sprucing up and by pushing paper to capture nearly $2 million in grants for water and sewer system renovations and a river-front park.
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