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Friendship

FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
It was perhaps the most unlikely of friendships, wrote Alistair Cooke, of his relationship with H.L. Mencken, the Baltimore author and critic. Cooke, 95, an author and broadcaster, died this week at his home in New York City. A native of Manchester, England, Cooke came to the United States in the early 1930s to study at Yale and Harvard universities. At Harvard, he began seriously studying the origins of American English, which naturally brought him in contact with Mencken, who had written The American Language.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
For my 40th birthday, this year, my mother gave me a diaphanous straw hat and a party to wear it to, a tome about tulips and some clothes for the garden, and Number 260 of the 500 numbered copies of Henry David Thoreau's meandering essay "Of Friendship." Drawn from "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and published by Houghton Mifflin at the turn of the century, the book is thin as a pack of cigarettes, gray as the slate of old roof tiles. According to the only stray marks on its otherwise immaculate pages, it was first uncovered in a bookstore window on 7th Street in Washington, already earning, by April of 1946, the time-honored appreciation "rare."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 15, 2001
Maliene Wajer had known Barbara Curran since she was 12, and she had always admired her. Barbara was the glamorous older cousin of a friend; and with her long black hair and long red fingernails she was so fabu, as Maliene would say now. Each married young and started a family. A few years later they ran into each other, and Barbara asked Maliene to lunch so their kids could play together. "I was so in awe I was afraid to go," says Maliene, now 57. "I kept talking about it until my husband said, 'Go or shut up.' So I went."
SPORTS
By Steve Campbell and Houston Chronicle | January 12, 2012
Arian Foster arrived in the NFL almost unnoticed, with a point he was willing to go to great lengths to prove. One of the telltale signs that Foster was well on his way to proving he wasn't the crazy one for believing he could flourish at football's highest level came during a December 2010 game against the Baltimore Ravens. Undrafted out of college, relegated to the practice squad for much of his first professional season, Foster was on his way to leading the league in rushing. During the second quarter of a Ravens victory at Reliant Stadium, All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis cornered Foster to say, "I love the way you play the game.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 5, 2012
"Please" and "thank you. " Teaching those words are the first steps parents take in the civilizing of their children. How to ask for something politely and with humility and how to express gratitude for something freely given. Strange that it should be so hard for me to do that now, all these years later. So hard to find the words to ask for help and the words to say how grateful I was. Faithful readers know that I fell - over absolutely nothing on my kitchen floor - and broke both bones in my ankle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 27, 2000
''Sometimes I wish somebody would use 'Art' as the first initials of the real title: 'A Rough Time,' 'A Real Time,' 'A Real Threat.' " Judd Hirsch is tossing out suggestions for re- titling French writer Yasmina Reza's 1998 Tony Award-winning play. It's true that a painting precipitates the action, but at its core, "Art" is a play about friendship. Specifically, it's about three middle-aged French men whose 15-year relationship is threatened when one buys an expensive all-white, abstract painting, much to the dismay of the other two. Hirsch, who stars in the touring production opening Tuesday at the Mechanic Theatre, admits he didn't recognize the play's broader context when he first saw it, in March 1998.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
They stood on the loading dock at Baltimore's Westport Elementary School, two distinct groups, casting furtive glances at each other -- one with elaborate up-do's, burgundy-streaked hair and short 'fros, the other with blond ponytails, glittered eyelids and sporty Ralph Lauren shirts. The latter group -- from affluent Clarksville Middle School -- had never been to the Westport/Mount Winans community, 30 miles away in Southwest Baltimore. The former had ventured into the other's neck of the woods only as far as The Mall in Columbia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 22, 2009
David H. Tilley, founder of a Baltimore chemical distribution company and a World War II veteran, died Feb. 12 of respiratory failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The West Friendship resident was 88. Mr. Tilley was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. He was a 1938 graduate of Loyola High School, where he was captain of the ice hockey team. After earning a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Loyola College in 1942, he enlisted in the Navy and served in the Pacific as a gunnery officer.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | February 24, 2002
Are you a woman who shares secrets with a male friend? Are you the kind of man who reviews his weekend plans with a female co-worker? Or do you go out for drinks with a colleague of the opposite sex? If you are married and answer yes to any of these questions, then therapist M. Gary Neuman has a word to describe your behavior: Unfaithful. "We can't fool ourselves into believing that we can have intimate relationships at work and still have a great relationship at home," says Neuman. "My message is that if you want to infuse passion and have a buddy for the rest of your life, you have to keep that emotional content in your marriage.
NEWS
May 1, 1996
Police logWest Friendship: 12700 block of Frederick Road: Someone smashed the front window of a High's store at the West Friendship Shopping Center about 2 a.m. yesterday, and took cigarettes and adult magazines.Pub Date: 5/01/96
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