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By Sandra McKee | sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
The City girls basketball team Friday night faced Riverdale Baptist - traditionally one of the toughest teams in the state - for the fourth straight time in the fourth annual Breezy Bishop Showcase at Western. This time Riverdale Baptist won, 56-45, as it had in each of the three previous meetings. But this time it was not a blowout, and the No. 7 Knights went home with hope for the rest of their season. "They had quick guards and could make their foul shots," said City senior guard LaShay Taft, who scored 11 points and will attend Syracuse next year.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
A 17-year-old Baltimore student is facing several assault charges in connection with a stabbing that occurred at a Southeast Baltimore school last week, according to court records. According to a notification sent to school officials, a 14-year-old student at Friendship Academy of Science and Technology was stabbed in the chest with a knife Friday after he and another student engaged in a verbal altercation. Sharrod Alston was arrested by Baltimore City school police. According to court records, Alston was charged as an adult with first- and second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and possession with a deadly weapon with the intent to injure.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
A 17-year-old Baltimore student is facing several assault charges in connection with a stabbing that occurred at a Southeast Baltimore school last week, according to court records. According to a notification sent to school officials, a 14-year-old student at Friendship Academy of Science and Technology was stabbed in the chest with a knife Friday after he and another student engaged in a verbal altercation. Sharrod Alston was arrested by Baltimore City school police. According to court records, Alston was charged as an adult with first- and second-degree assault, disorderly conduct and possession with a deadly weapon with the intent to injure.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A 14-year-old student at Friendship Academy of Science and Technology in Baltimore was stabbed Friday in the chest with a knife after a verbal altercation with a fellow student, according to a notification sent out to school officials obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A 17-year-old student was arrested. City school officials confirmed in a statement that a student "was injured by a weapon during an altercation" on Friday morning. The statement said the student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital and is in stable condition.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Looking to create more interaction between baseball players from Baltimore City public and private schools, organizers of the President's Cup have changed the event's format, eschewing a 16-team public vs. private tournament in favor of a single East vs. West all-star game. Now in its fourth year, the event -- to take place Saturday at 1 p.m. at Camden Yards -- will feature two 25-man teams comprised of players from a mixture of 18 public and private schools. Lester Davis, the director of communications and media relations for City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young, said the new format better lends itself to building relationships between players from diverse social and economic backgrounds.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 6, 2013
Baltimore city government employees are now able to devote up to two work hours per week to helping third-grade students hone their reading skills, the mayor's office announced this month. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake signed the executive order on Feb. 1, according to a release, that would allow full-time employees to volunteer in the Baltimore city school system to provide one-on-one tutoring to students struggling with reading--a cause the mayor has taken up as part of her "Third Grade Reads Initiative.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Lines snaked around the gymnasium Saturday at the Friendship Academy in Canton, where about 500 Latino residents received passports, birth certificates or other services offered by the Mexican consulate and Baltimore City. The mobile consulate event helped recent immigrants in the city obtain documents, as well as legal and health services, without having to travel to the nearest consulate office in Washington. "Because there is a large population here, we wanted to bring our services here," said Aníbal Gómez Toledo, head of the Mexican consular office in D.C..
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
While Fort McHenry's cannons blasted at schooners in the Baltimore harbor Tuesday, the voices of children from several city schools rose above the din. The young singers quivered a bit but stayed on key as they sang patriotic anthems. Four choirs and one wind ensemble performed at the fort's first maritime and musical education experience as the 1814 Battle of Baltimore was re-enacted - with ersatz cannon blasts and authentic smoke - in the background. A few children held their ears or jumped at the suddenness of the volleys, but they kept on singing.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Oriole Park at Camden Yards was the site Saturday of a contest waged not with bats, balls and gloves but test scores, curriculum overviews and student testimonials. It was the annual school choice fair for Baltimore City public schools. Students and staff from 64 middle schools and high schools set up shop to woo fifth- and eighth-graders who will soon choose where to attend next year. School officials said that nearly 15,000 people came to the event on the stadium's club-level concourse, triple the number of attendees last year.
NEWS
By Justin George and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
From Cherry Hill to a West Side high school a few miles away, scores of families and friends turned out Wednesday night to mourn teenagers killed in recent days, and to decry persistent violence in the city. On the block where 14-year-old Najee Thomas was killed, residents attended an anti-violence rally. Standing on the curb was the boy who lost his best friend, now too scared to go to the school bus stop alone. In the back of the crowd was the attorney who came because she was touched that Najee had aspired to be a lawyer like herself.
NEWS
By Justin George and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
From Cherry Hill to a West Side high school a few miles away, scores of families and friends turned out Wednesday night to mourn teenagers killed in recent days, and to decry persistent violence in the city. On the block where 14-year-old Najee Thomas was killed, residents attended an anti-violence rally. Standing on the curb was the boy who lost his best friend, now too scared to go to the school bus stop alone. In the back of the crowd was the attorney who came because she was touched that Najee had aspired to be a lawyer like herself.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Looking to create more interaction between baseball players from Baltimore City public and private schools, organizers of the President's Cup have changed the event's format, eschewing a 16-team public vs. private tournament in favor of a single East vs. West all-star game. Now in its fourth year, the event -- to take place Saturday at 1 p.m. at Camden Yards -- will feature two 25-man teams comprised of players from a mixture of 18 public and private schools. Lester Davis, the director of communications and media relations for City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young, said the new format better lends itself to building relationships between players from diverse social and economic backgrounds.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | November 21, 2013
The first public hearing before the Baltimore City school board about the recommendations to close schools run by external operators spurred heated exchanges between operators and school officials, and left board members questioning the consistency of the district's decisions about which schools should be given second chances. Earlier this month, Interim CEO Tisha Edwards introduced a sweeping plan that called for seven traditional and externally operated schools to close. The contracted schools recommended for closure are: Baltimore Talent Development High School, Baltimore Community High School, Bluford Drew Jemison East and Bluford Drew Jemison West STEM academies, Baltimore Civitas Middle/High School, Baltimore Antioch Diploma Plus High School, and Baltimore Liberation Diploma Plus High School.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
City school officials said they will take extra security measures at a Southeast Baltimore charter school after five fires were set this week at the school, which also had an altercation that injured an administrator and a student arrest. Officials said they will increase the presence of school police officers and district staff at the Friendship Academy of Science and Technology Middle/High School, which they acknowledged has had "significant safety issues" this week. Among them were five trash-can fires - two Wednesday and three Thursday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 6, 2013
Baltimore city government employees are now able to devote up to two work hours per week to helping third-grade students hone their reading skills, the mayor's office announced this month. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake signed the executive order on Feb. 1, according to a release, that would allow full-time employees to volunteer in the Baltimore city school system to provide one-on-one tutoring to students struggling with reading--a cause the mayor has taken up as part of her "Third Grade Reads Initiative.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
While Fort McHenry's cannons blasted at schooners in the Baltimore harbor Tuesday, the voices of children from several city schools rose above the din. The young singers quivered a bit but stayed on key as they sang patriotic anthems. Four choirs and one wind ensemble performed at the fort's first maritime and musical education experience as the 1814 Battle of Baltimore was re-enacted - with ersatz cannon blasts and authentic smoke - in the background. A few children held their ears or jumped at the suddenness of the volleys, but they kept on singing.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A 14-year-old student at Friendship Academy of Science and Technology in Baltimore was stabbed Friday in the chest with a knife after a verbal altercation with a fellow student, according to a notification sent out to school officials obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A 17-year-old student was arrested. City school officials confirmed in a statement that a student "was injured by a weapon during an altercation" on Friday morning. The statement said the student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital and is in stable condition.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
City school officials said they will take extra security measures at a Southeast Baltimore charter school after five fires were set this week at the school, which also had an altercation that injured an administrator and a student arrest. Officials said they will increase the presence of school police officers and district staff at the Friendship Academy of Science and Technology Middle/High School, which they acknowledged has had "significant safety issues" this week. Among them were five trash-can fires - two Wednesday and three Thursday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | August 26, 2012
When Tanya Green was tapped to turn around the once-beleaguered Calverton Middle School in 2008, she paid close attention to not only what the staff in her school had to say about their barriers, but how they said it -- or sometimes what they failed to say at all. She noticed if they referred to students as, "these kids," or "the children. " She noticed whether they took responsibility for their students' failures, or transferred it on someone else. She took note of whether a teacher was as concerned about whether their students had lunch as they were about their test scores.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Oriole Park at Camden Yards was the site Saturday of a contest waged not with bats, balls and gloves but test scores, curriculum overviews and student testimonials. It was the annual school choice fair for Baltimore City public schools. Students and staff from 64 middle schools and high schools set up shop to woo fifth- and eighth-graders who will soon choose where to attend next year. School officials said that nearly 15,000 people came to the event on the stadium's club-level concourse, triple the number of attendees last year.
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