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By Harry Summers | February 6, 1991
THERE ARE fears that at least some of the 11 U.S. Marines killed in action in the fighting along the Kuwaiti-Saudi Arabian border last week may have been struck down by friendly fire.The sad truth is that such incidents are not unusual on the battlefield.In the Civil War, for example, one of the South's most famous generals, Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson, died from friendly fire. While on reconnaissance near Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863, he and his staff were mistaken for Union cavalrymen and fired on by his own men. Severely wounded, he died just over a week later of complications from his wounds.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Two years to the day after Baltimore police officer William H. Torbit Jr. was shot by fellow members of the department, members of his family staged small demonstrations in front of city buildings and called on officials to take a fresh look at the case. "There was no outside investigation," said Torbit's sister Venus Torbit. "We want the community to have the facts. " Family members held placards with Torbit's picture and gathered in small groups outside City Hall and police headquarters Wednesday.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Air Force plans to announce today that it is effectively ending the careers of at least seven officers who initially were given slaps on the wrist for their role in the downing of two Army helicopters over Iraq last year.The unusual action comes as the result of a growing anger among lawmakers, surviving family members and even senior military officials that no one had been held accountable for the "friendly fire" incident that killed 26 people, including 15 Americans.This feeling intensified after the acquittal in June of the only person to face a court-martial in the accidental shooting, Capt.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | December 9, 2011
A Baltimore police officer who was hit by a bullet accidentally fired by a Baltimore County colleague during a raid on Tuesday returned fire, but did not aim at the officer who shot him, according to a police union lawyer. Instead, the city officer fired straight ahead as he was going down a small set of stairs dividing a split-level house, according to the lawyer, Michael Marshall. The attorney said the city officer had been shot from an officer standing behind him, but thought the threat was in front of him. “They didn't expect to be going into a dark area,” said Marshall, who works for a law firm contracted with the Fraternal Order of Police, which is assisting both officers with the case.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
In the desert darkness of the Persian Gulf, Army Lt. Col. Ralph Hayles fired the missiles that obliterated two armored vehicles, killing two young American soldiers. But don't ask him how he feels about this incident they call "friendly fire." Don't ask him that question."The question is not, 'How do you feel?' The question is, 'How do you fix it?' " says Mr. Hayles, whose tragic error on the eve of the Desert Storm ground war in 1991 cost him the command of an elite Apache helicopter unit and exposed his private pain to public scrutiny.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Army officials acknowledged yesterday that their reporting of "friendly fire" deaths during the Persian Gulf war was flawed, but they denied that military officials attempted to cover up the number of such deaths.In testimony before a House Armed Services subcommittee, Lt. Gen. William H. Reno, who directs the Army's notification process, said the names of suspected "friendly fire" victims were withheld during the war until causes of death could be determined with certainty.
NEWS
By Frank Starr and Frank Starr,Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | February 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Military officials announced yesterday a second incident in which U.S. Marines may have been hit -- and one killed -- by friendly fire.Maj. Gen. Robert Johnston told reporters in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, that conclusive results of the investigation of the previous incident, in which 11 Marines died last Thursday, could be expected by today.The new incident occurred shortly after midnight yesterday when a Marine convoy was hit with cluster bombs and three of the Marines were wounded, Gen. Johnston said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In an extremely rare reaction to a 'friendly fire' incident, the Air Force announced yesterday that it has charged an F-15 fighter pilot with 26 counts of negligent &L homicide in the mistaken shooting down earlier this year of two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters over Iraq.Five other Air Force crew members were charged with various counts of dereliction of duty in the April 14 accident in the no-fly zone over northern Iraq. Twenty-six people, including 15 Americans, were killed when the Air Force crew members mistook the aircraft for Russian-built Hind helicopters flown by the Iraqi military.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon quadrupled its tally of U.S. troops killed and injured by friendly fire in the Persian Gulf war from 26 to 107 yesterday and revealed that a staggering 77 percent of combat damage to the Army's Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles also was caused by U.S. forces.The Pentagon had said earlier that friendly fire was involved in six incidents, killing 11 and wounding 15. It revised the figures yesterday to 28 incidents, 35 deaths and 72 wounded.The Army bore the brunt of the friendly-fire casualties, with 21 killed and 65 wounded.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When a U.S. missile ripped into a Marine armored vehicle in late January in Saudi Arabia, killing seven Marines on board with a shower of metal, the vast, clanking machinery of military bureaucracy moved into high gear to attack the hazards of "friendly fire."Within a few weeks, more than 35 ways of preventing such accidents had been tested in the Arizona desert and forwarded to the front, and now the redoubled effort is continuing with the Army's new Center for Identification Technology at Fort Meade.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
It's been more than nine months since the tragic death of city Police Officer William H. Torbit Jr., who was killed by friendly fire from fellow officers in January as he tried to disperse an unruly crowd outside a downtown night club, and the public is still waiting for answers. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake promised a prompt, independent investigation of the shooting, which claimed the life of an unarmed civilian and wounded several other people in addition to ending Officer Torbit's life.
NEWS
August 6, 2011
For a department that has seen more than its share of troubles, perhaps none could count as a more painful failure for the Baltimore Police Department than the January killing of plainclothes Officer William Torbit Jr. by friendly fire as he was trying to break up a fight outside a downtown club. The incident, and the mysterious circumstances surrounding it, cast a stain on Mr. Torbit, the other officers and the entire department's training, practice and procedures. The decision by City State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein not to charge anyone in connection with the incident, which also resulted in the death of a civilian, Sean Gamble, provides a degree of exoneration for the officers, but it doesn't erase what happened.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
As an independent commission begins its review into a friendly-fire shooting that killed a Baltimore police officer in January, the city spending board on Wednesday approved $45,000 already spent for the officer's funeral and $75,000 to fund the commission's investigation of his death. Officer William H. Torbit Jr. was fatally shot by fellow officers in January after responding in plainclothes to a disturbance outside a Paca Street club. Torbit was overcome by an unruly crowd and is believed to have fired his service weapon and killed a civilian, Sean Gamble.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Baltimore's new state's attorney, Gregg L. Bernstein, got elected by promising that his close alliance with police would help make the city safer. Opponents warned of an end to prosecutorial oversight that would let cops run roughshod over city residents. What no one expected was a case that could not only pit the community against police but also police against police. The Jan. 9 fatal shooting of plainclothes Officer William H. Torbit Jr. by four of his colleagues who mistook him for a suspect is the top prosecutor's first test, occurring just days after he took office.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Police on Thursday announced funeral arrangements for an officer killed last weekend while trying to quell an unruly crowd outside a club in downtown Baltimore. A public viewing for Officer William H. Torbit, 33, will be held from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Wylie Funeral Home in Randallstown. Funeral services will take place the following day at 11 a.m. at The Cathedral of Mary Our Queen on North Charles St. in Baltimore. Torbit's remains will be interred at Arbutus Memorial Park in Baltimore, police said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore's mayor promised an outside, independent review of the "friendly fire" shooting that claimed the life of a plainclothes city police officer as commanders ordered those who dress in civilian clothes to wear uniforms or jackets identifying them as law enforcement. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she is "very concerned by initial facts that indicate only police weapons were discharged" during the early Sunday melee outside the Select Lounge on North Paca Street.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Baltimore police officers might have shot and killed a fellow officer and an unarmed man after observing the officer draw his weapon while trying to quell a disturbance outside a club near downtown early Sunday, according to law enforcement sources and a relative of one of the victims. Police released few details about the circumstances of the shooting, but they described a chaotic scene outside the Select Lounge in the 400 block of N. Paca St., with fights spilling out of the club and into the street around 1:15 a.m. "There was an altercation that took place very near the club and some officers worked to intercede in that fight, at which time some gunshots were discharged," said Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. "Several officers fired multiple shots.
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