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Fried Rice

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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | May 8, 1991
During those days when both time and money are in short supply, a harried cook needs to be able to fall back on some easy, inexpensive recipes.A concern for health and fitness places another requirement on these recipes: The food should be low in fat (especially saturated fat) and high fiber and in complex carbohydrates. Seven-Ingredient Fried Rice fulfills all three of these requirements deliciously.The ingredients for the zesty, aromatic sauce can be assembled as much as two weeks in advance and refrigerated until ready to prepare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2012
What impressed me first about the Kung Pao Chicken ($8.99) at this new Harbor East eatery was its boisterous fire. The pepper heat comes up front, with an intensity many Asian restaurants won't offer unless you ask for it. The Kung Pao declares the kitchen is not afraid to scare off wobbly Western palates, which are no doubt less timid than they used to be. Manchurian's heat in this dish is pleasantly risky. The consistency of the bean sauce carried nice smoky notes, and there's no question chilies were at work.
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NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2006
With Ms. Visa and Mr. MasterCard about to come a-calling laden with holiday bills, it's important to stretch those food dollars - and have fun doing it. Take something as basic as leftover steamed white rice. Not exciting on its own, but it's exactly what you need to make fried rice that is as good or better than Chinese takeout. Freshly cooked rice is too wet and gummy to be fried. Refrigerating the cooked rice overnight allows the grains to dry out a bit so they'll remain separate when fried.
SPORTS
July 29, 2007
Another summer, another stretch of sauna-like temperatures in the Baltimore region. But it's also another opportunity to watch Ravens training camp at McDaniel College in Westminster. The city of 16,731 (according to the 2000 U.S. census) is not grandiose, but it never tries to be. Main Street is a quaint mix of row houses and mom-and-pop businesses. Here are a few tips for those who decide to visit during training camp. at camp Best places to park The parking lot at Bair Stadium off Main Street can hold about 700 cars and is available to the public free on a first-come, first-served basis, according to Bob Eller, senior director of operations for the Ravens.
FEATURES
By Barbara Hansen and Barbara Hansen,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1996
It is the dish that traditionally winds up a Cantonese banquet a last burst of brilliant flavor to enchant guests already satiated with glorious flavors. In Chinese homes, it turns into a thrifty catchall for leftovers.It is fried rice, both the pinnacle of Chinese cuisine and the poor man's staple.No one in Asia wastes food, least of all rice, the staff of life. Even the crust clinging to the bottom of the pot is used. With day-old rice and the remnants of last night's dinner, a gifted cook can produce a noteworthy new dish.
NEWS
By Kristin Eddy and Kristin Eddy,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
You may be in the mood for a Chinese restaurant classic: shrimp fried rice. This recipe is a lot lighter and brighter than many takeout versions. MENU: Shrimp fried rice Braised bok choy Mandarin-orange salad Lemon cookies Hot spiced tea TIME-SAVING TIPS: * Buying chopped vegetables from a supermarket salad bar will cut down on preparation time. * Buy already-shelled shrimp or even cooked shrimp. Kristin Eddy writes for the Chicago Tribune. Shrimp Fried Rice Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 6 minutes Yield: 4 servings 1/3 cup each: soy sauce, chicken broth 2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar or sherry 1 / 8 teaspoon ground white or black pepper 1 pound raw shrimp, peeled, deveined 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil 1 1/2 cups fresh snow peas 1/2 cup each: fresh or frozen corn kernels, shredded carrot 2 bunches green onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 eggs, beaten 2 cups jasmine or long-grain white rice, cooked Combine soy sauce, broth, vinegar and pepper in a small bowl; set aside.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
The Hunan Pagoda was like a long lost friend: It was a little hard to find, and then did not quite live up to our memories and expectations.Since our last culinary meeting, Route 100 has sliced through the neighborhood, diverting traffic (and potential customers) from the stretch of Dorsey Road in Hanover the restaurant occupies.And the little restaurant has gotten smaller -- giving up a section of a dining room that rarely seemed crowded to its next-door neighbor in the shopping strip, an Italian eatery.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | August 22, 1992
Hing WahSuite 101, 212 S. Bond St., Bel Air.Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays,11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.(410) 879-8883. Cheap lunchtime specials first wooed me inside this Chinese restaurant and carryout. Super service and an extensive menu keep me, and lots of other Bel Air office workers, coming back.Shrimp with lobster sauce and pork fried rice is only $4.95 at lunchtime. Other dishes, such as chicken chow mein, cost even less at $3.95. Lunch box specials are available Mondays to Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.Warning: If you don't like it hot, say so before ordering.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2005
I asked the young man behind the counter at Tian Yi what the name of the restaurant meant in English. He smiled sheepishly before answering: "No. 1 in the world." Well, why not aim high, I figured. But, wait. After plowing through an enormous amount of Tian Yi's food later that evening, we realized this little carryout in Waverly deserves some heartfelt kudos. Regular readers will recall my persistent complaint that Baltimore's Chinese carryouts are too timid with their spices and too liberal with their cornstarch and other thickeners that tend to turn all dishes into goo. Not Tian Yi. The young cooks working in a large open kitchen created several potent, nongooey dishes.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
At Lucky's China Inn at Oakland Mills Village Center, owner Elsa Chang serves up recipes created by her husband and her husband's brother. One such dish is "Two Brothers' Shrimp," featuring lightly fried shrimp served with broccoli in a creamy sauce. "Don't ask for the recipe - they won't tell you," warns the menu. "My husband and his brother, they are from China," said Chang, who is from Hong Kong. "His brother is a very good chef in China and he [taught] us the recipe." Chang has owned Lucky's since 1998, when the village center was renovated.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2006
With Ms. Visa and Mr. MasterCard about to come a-calling laden with holiday bills, it's important to stretch those food dollars - and have fun doing it. Take something as basic as leftover steamed white rice. Not exciting on its own, but it's exactly what you need to make fried rice that is as good or better than Chinese takeout. Freshly cooked rice is too wet and gummy to be fried. Refrigerating the cooked rice overnight allows the grains to dry out a bit so they'll remain separate when fried.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2005
I asked the young man behind the counter at Tian Yi what the name of the restaurant meant in English. He smiled sheepishly before answering: "No. 1 in the world." Well, why not aim high, I figured. But, wait. After plowing through an enormous amount of Tian Yi's food later that evening, we realized this little carryout in Waverly deserves some heartfelt kudos. Regular readers will recall my persistent complaint that Baltimore's Chinese carryouts are too timid with their spices and too liberal with their cornstarch and other thickeners that tend to turn all dishes into goo. Not Tian Yi. The young cooks working in a large open kitchen created several potent, nongooey dishes.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
There are several China Woks scattered around Baltimore. The one in Towson, in the York Road Plaza, is an ambience-free carryout with dependable service that works well for parents looking to feed kids after Little League games. Unfortunately, on our recent visit, we came across little to recommend in the cuisine department. As with so many low-cost Chinese restaurants, this China Wok seems determined not to upset customers by over-seasoning any of its food. For appetizers, we tried steamed pork dumplings ($3.95)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2003
Baltimore, I keep learning, has no shortage of unimpressive-looking but perfectly pleasing ethnic carryouts. Add one more to the list: Chokchai Thai Food, a humble little eatery on Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore. There's little to brighten up this storefront's premises except for some Thai-themed pictures, a 2002 Orioles calendar and a stack of magazines, including a copy of Thailand Illustrated dating from 1996. But on a recent visit, the food was fresh, generally well prepared and affordable.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2002
The hunt for high-quality Chinese carryout continues. At Mr. Chan Szechuan Restaurant in the heart of Pikesville, we discovered nothing spectacular but found several solid dishes and an admirable sampling of vegetarian fare. Mr. Chan occupies a corner space on Reisterstown Road, its facade illuminated with yards of neon, including one sign depicting a jumping fish. Inside is a cozy space with green carpet, bamboo plants and mirrors on both ends to give the room more depth. Posters explaining the various types of sushi hang on two walls.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2002
My heart sank as we parked outside the new No. 1 Chinese Restaurant on Roland Avenue in Hampden. "They have pictures of the food," my son said disdainfully. Inside, the No. 1 did indeed have photographs of many dishes - which in my son's experience is not a good sign. And the restaurant had about as much character as a bus station - linoleum floor, fluorescent lights and only a couple of chairs to wait in. And we waited. Despite having called in our order well ahead of our arrival, we had to wait 10 more minutes for the food, bringing the preparation time to more than 30 minutes.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | December 14, 1991
GREAT EASTERN CHINESE RESTAURANT 323 Park Ave., Baltimore. Hours: Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; noon to 11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Call (410) 685-2868. Great Eastern's spicy pork lo mein is the only reason I ever finished renovating my Ridgely's Delight row house. Every weekend I would promise my neighbor, Art, a large order of pork lo mein ($5.50) and shrimp toast ($3.50) if he would just help me put up another panel of Sheetrock. It worked.This nifty little carryout also delivers downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2012
What impressed me first about the Kung Pao Chicken ($8.99) at this new Harbor East eatery was its boisterous fire. The pepper heat comes up front, with an intensity many Asian restaurants won't offer unless you ask for it. The Kung Pao declares the kitchen is not afraid to scare off wobbly Western palates, which are no doubt less timid than they used to be. Manchurian's heat in this dish is pleasantly risky. The consistency of the bean sauce carried nice smoky notes, and there's no question chilies were at work.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
At Lucky's China Inn at Oakland Mills Village Center, owner Elsa Chang serves up recipes created by her husband and her husband's brother. One such dish is "Two Brothers' Shrimp," featuring lightly fried shrimp served with broccoli in a creamy sauce. "Don't ask for the recipe - they won't tell you," warns the menu. "My husband and his brother, they are from China," said Chang, who is from Hong Kong. "His brother is a very good chef in China and he [taught] us the recipe." Chang has owned Lucky's since 1998, when the village center was renovated.
NEWS
By Kristin Eddy and Kristin Eddy,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
You may be in the mood for a Chinese restaurant classic: shrimp fried rice. This recipe is a lot lighter and brighter than many takeout versions. MENU: Shrimp fried rice Braised bok choy Mandarin-orange salad Lemon cookies Hot spiced tea TIME-SAVING TIPS: * Buying chopped vegetables from a supermarket salad bar will cut down on preparation time. * Buy already-shelled shrimp or even cooked shrimp. Kristin Eddy writes for the Chicago Tribune. Shrimp Fried Rice Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 6 minutes Yield: 4 servings 1/3 cup each: soy sauce, chicken broth 2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar or sherry 1 / 8 teaspoon ground white or black pepper 1 pound raw shrimp, peeled, deveined 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil 1 1/2 cups fresh snow peas 1/2 cup each: fresh or frozen corn kernels, shredded carrot 2 bunches green onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 eggs, beaten 2 cups jasmine or long-grain white rice, cooked Combine soy sauce, broth, vinegar and pepper in a small bowl; set aside.
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