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By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 1997
We picked a terrible night to go to the Olney Ale House, but it had nothing to do with the restaurant itself. The problem was the rain. We had been told that a Sunday-afternoon drive past horse farms on Route 108 is part of the charm of a visit to this Montgomery County restaurant, but the rain was coming down so hard that taking the scenic route would have been futile.Owner Anita Virkus opened the Ale House in 1973. There's still a touch of hippie wholesomeness on her menu, notably in the lemon-tahini salad dressing and macrobiotic rice pudding.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2014
From: Rissian River Valley, Calif. Price: $20 Serve with: Grilled salmon, fried chicken, crabs If you associate pink wines with sweetness, this wine could come as a surprise. It's a classic dry rose, bordering on severe but very stylish and crisp. It's a perfect wine to serve well-chilled on a summer evening on the deck or patio. It offers lively flavors of cherry, strawberry and rosehips and a distinct mineral character. Its elevated 14.5 percent alcohol is well-masked by the fruit but could creep up on the unwary because one glass will lead to a desire for a second, etc. -- Michael Dresser , The Baltimore Sun
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
Federal agents raided more than a dozen foreign-owned takeout chicken restaurants in Baltimore yesterday, seizing computers and business records that officials said could document widespread tax evasion and immigration violations. Authorities executed the search warrants as part of a yearlong probe of possible criminal activity connected with New York Fried Chicken, a loose-knit restaurant chain operated in the region primarily by Afghan natives. In court records, investigators with the Internal Revenue Service alleged that the restaurant operators avoided reporting wages or paying other taxes for years by hiring illegal aliens and conducting the bulk of their business in cash transactions.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
I have commended to your attention the catalogue of stale opening devices compiled by the late Dick Thien, trusting that you will know what to do when confronted by the Webster's Dictionary lead and the King James lead. Friends don't let friends write cliche leads.  This morning I opened the paper and my baleful eye fell on a stinking cliche not held up for scorn in Mr. Thien's list: "Ah, fried chicken. "  There is an "ah" lead in a text in my vault that I bring out for the copy editing class.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 18, 2000
NOTHING could be more predictable in Maryland than watermen complaining about limits on their harvests. Here's the reaction of the president of the Maryland Watermen's Association to a blue-ribbon committee's suggestion that Maryland and Virginia cut their harvests of blue crabs, whose numbers are declining: "These scientists are too ... arrogant to talk to the right people. The fishermen ought to make the rules." Yeah, right. If the fishermen made the rules, there'd be nothing in the Chesapeake but carp.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2006
A knowledgeable cook can make a reputation on terrific fried chicken, but a badly done bird - gummy, greasy or otherwise poorly rendered - can ruin that reputation. Most of us have an idea of what fried chicken should be, but John T. Edge can describe it. In fact, in 2004, he wrote the book about it. Fried Chicken: An American Story details his cross-country ramble in search of the perfect poultry. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi, found that fried chicken is universal, but good fried chicken is a peerless treasure.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Growing up in the South, I remember fried chicken as a staple at my mother's table. Although she never claimed to be a serious cook, my mom (like her mother before her) was an expert at turning out crisp, golden morsels of chicken. There were two things to remember, she repeatedly asserted: The floured pieces had to be placed into piping-hot oil, preferably sizzling in a cast-iron skillet, so that the skin would brown immediately and form a crust. Once browned, the chicken had to be covered with a lid, set slightly ajar, and cooked for several minutes more to ensure that the meat would be moist and tender.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
For weeks, Columbia resident Diane Taylor yearned for the taste of fried chicken, homemade macaroni and cheese, seasoned collard greens and peach cobbler.But she couldn't find the ideal place offering the food that would nourish her soul. Then came a recommendation from a friend.A small soul food restaurant on U.S. 1 in Jessup near Route 175, the Log Cabin, prepares the cuisine just the way Taylor likes it."I was in heaven," she said, recalling her first visit. "For so long I had to go into Washington or Baltimore to get some soul food, just because I didn't know that this place existed in Howard County."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | July 22, 1999
The White Haven ferry saves me. The sun is sinking, and so am I. I am beginning to feel weighed down by my eating adventure across the state.When the boat comes into view, my spirits soar. The dull-gray ferry, which links Routes 352 and 362 at the border of Somerset and Wicomico counties, is not an impressive-looking craft. But finding a boat in the middle of farmland is so unexpected, such a scenic surprise, that it gives me a thrill.Instead of plodding along another highway, I am floating on a vessel across the gleaming Wicomico River.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 23, 1998
You've had a long, hard day at work and stopped off at the gym before you made your way home. You're too tired to cook, too tired even to eat out. You're the ideal candidate for the hottest new trend in the food industry, "home meal replacement" - which happens to be as old as a 1950s' frozen dinner.The difference is that the '90s version of the fried chicken, mashed potatoes and peas in the little aluminum tray is something like this: boneless chicken breast marinated with fajita spices and grilled, pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and capers, and haricots verts - all sold by the pound under the label "gourmet to go."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2013
From: Coteaux d'Aix-en-Provence, France Price: $11 Serve with: Fried chicken, grilled salmon This is a bracing, crisp, bone-dry pink wine from the south of France. It demonstrates what non-snobbish wine lovers have known a long time: Dry roses are serious wines. This excellent version offers penetrating flavors of sherry, strawberry and rosehips. It's best served before the weather gets cold. -- Michael Dresser
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
I don't tune into Baltimore's morning news shows expecting hard-hitting, revealing interviews. Traffic, weather, softer features and a few nuts-and-bolts news stories are the usual order of the day. But WBFF's Patrice Sanders stopped me cold on May 24 with an interview she did with Baltimore City Schools CEO Andres Alonso in response to an audit that found tens of thousands of federal stimulus dollars had been misspent on his watch. Alonso, who is stepping down at the end of June, was defensive, combative and, in the eyes of some Facebook responders, insulting in calling Sanders a liar, denouncing her questions and denigrating the station.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
Among the expenditures by the city school system that U.S. Department of Education auditors found inappropriate: $4,352 spent by two elementary schools for dinner cruises at Baltimore's Inner Harbor $2,413 spent on fried chicken, potato salad, coleslaw, biscuits, cookies and soda for 28 attendees at a PTA meeting to discuss a school's budget $1,336 spent to take 30 people to a theater performance downtown that included dinner, dancing and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
Of Love & Regret - Pub & Provisions, the collaboration between Brian Strumke of Stillwater Ales and Ted Stelzenmuller of Jack's Bistro, is set to open on Wednesday. The pub's doors will open at 11 a.m. on Wednesday for lunch and a line-up of 20 "esoteric beers" on draft, more than half of them Stillwater Ales. The "provisions" part of Pub & Provisions, a second-floor shop selling gourmet products, many of them Stillwater-designed and branded, along with beer, wine and liquor, will open later this year.
SPORTS
May 13, 2012
Get through to him Steve Gould Baltimore Sun As much as Josh Beckett's comments show a disconnect with — perhaps even outright disrespect for — his team and its fans, the Red Sox have little recourse other than to try to hammer into his head why his behavior is so rankling. And good luck with that. Don't let Beckett's horrid outing Thursday or his 5.97 season ERA fool you: He's still a good pitcher and one the Red Sox need. Four of his six outings have been quality starts, and all the outcry over beer and chicken doesn't change the fact that he posted a 2.89 ERA and 8.2 Ks/9 IP last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Spring arrived officially weeks ago, but restaurants are just rolling out their spring menus now. That's our planet for you; real spring arrives when it's good and ready. Bluegrass Tavern in South Baltimore debuts its spring menu Thursday night. New among the First Bites on Ray Kumm's menu: spring asparagus served with Vermont quark ravioli and hazelnut honey, Taylor Bay scallops with egg-yolk vermicelli and oyster mushrooms and chilled English pea soup with smokehouse-almond gelato and crawfish oil. Main Bites on Bluegrass Tavern's spring menu include Pan seared grouper, with butter braised leeks and crispy Hen-of-the-Woods mushrooms; milk-braise rabbit thigh; roasted poussin; crispy smoked Creekstone beef belly and grilled Broken Ranch antelope with fried duck egg, antelope "Merguez" and fava beans.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL AND JANE STERN and MICHAEL AND JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | May 19, 1991
NEBRASKA CITY, Neb. -- On U.S. 75 just east of Nebraska City, heading into town, look carefully on your right. See that old gray gas station? It isn't a gas station any more. It is Ulbrick's, home of fried chicken dinners extraordinaire.The cause for regular customers' affection is simple, and can be expressed in three words: fried chicken dinners. We thought about shortening it to two words -- fried chicken -- which is moist and succulent inside its well-seasoned, golden-crisp crust, cooked in pure lard in a big old skillet.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 1, 2008
Rain Pryor was getting divorced and looking for change nearly two years ago, when she left LA for Baltimore, home to two good friends. "Best move I ever made," the Charles Village resident and daughter of the late comedian Richard Pryor says today. Why is Charm City such a good fit for the actress, comedian, author and singer (who, by the way, will give a jazz cabaret performance to benefit the Maryland Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Hippodrome on Friday)? Demographics? Pryor also does a one-woman show, Fried Chicken and Latkes, that's all about being Jewish and black, and Baltimore has lots of both cultures, if not lots of double dippers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
A man, armed with a handgun, robbed a Glen Burnie restaurant Wednesday evening. Employees of the Kentucky Fried Chicken in the 6700 block of Ritchie Highway told police a man, in a black ski mask, entered the business at about 9:30 p.m., displayed the gun and demanded money. He left with an undisclosed amount of cash and was last seen running toward Furnace Branch Road, police said. Officers canvassed the area, but did not locate the suspect. Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
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