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Peter Schmuck | January 19, 2013
For all the years that they did battle in the clubhouse or the sports pages or on the dais of some charity roast, Jim Palmer knew how Earl Weaver really felt about him. That's why he had to hold back tears Saturday when he related his favorite memory of the Earl of Baltimore - a memory made more poignant because it also involved his late teammate Mike Flanagan. It was way back, on one of those balmy spring training days in Miami, when the Orioles were always one of the best teams in baseball and Palmer was their pitching ace. Flanagan, still figuring things out in his early 20s, was sitting on the bench next to Weaver.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
City and state officials are re-evaluating their approach to a proposed railroad cargo facility in Southwest Baltimore, acknowledging that their initial response to community concerns fell flat. The public backlash stalled the CSX Corp. project, which is nearly a year behind schedule, and created tension between local officials, who are collaborating on bringing a project considered critical to the port of Baltimore to fruition, according to interviews and internal email. "It's a difficult project.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 1999
JERUSALEM -- In what may mark the end of rogue Jewish settlement outposts, the Israeli government plans to begin removing hilltop encampments erected illegally over the past couple of years in the West Bank, officials said yesterday.Prime Minister Ehud Barak received the go-ahead from a special Cabinet committee yesterday to order the dismantling of the small settlements."The government is on the verge of telling the military which caravan outposts should be removed," a government source said last night.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Legislation that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana hit friction in a key committee Thursday afternoon. The proposal to give only a fine - and not jail time - to people caught with less than 10 grams of pot passed the Senate earlier this month with bi-partisan support. On Thursday, lawmakers on the House Judiciary Committee intensely questioned whether the measure went too far. Del. Luiz Simmons pointed out the committee supported the limited medical marijuana plan , currently advancing in the Senate, that involves academic research.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | June 30, 2002
I recently got a letter from Jason Nemoy. He and his wife are first-time homebuyers who bought a new home in Baltimore in October. They had a home inspection, and the items that were noted are being slowly being fixed by the builder during their one-year warranty period. But they feel that one thing was overlooked: a pinging/knocking sound in some of the plumbing in the house. Mr. Nemoy stated that he has made the builder aware of the problem but that the builder's reply was that "it's normal and it won't cause any problems."
NEWS
April 18, 2001
THE TALKS in Beijing between technical military delegations from the United States and China will deal with the friction demonstrated by the April 1 air collision near Hainan. The goal should be an agreement such as the United States forged with the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War -- one that prevented such incidents, and ensured that low-level misbehavior or misunderstanding did not drag the superpowers along. That agreement won't likely appear overnight. In the longer run, the tone of this contact will prove to be an early indicator of the larger economic and political relationship that is unfolding.
NEWS
By ELLIE BAUBLITZ and ELLIE BAUBLITZ,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
The 13 youngsters at the Eldersburg library branch vigorously rubbed the bow string across the wooden dowel rod, trying to heat a spoon held on top of the rod. "This is neat," said Joseph Padula, 7, of Eldersburg. "Do we get to keep these when we're done?" Joseph and Joshua Stem, another 7-year-old from Eldersburg, rubbed the string so hard that the spoon bent from the heat, teaching them the lesson for the day - friction makes heat. The experiment was part of an "Aha! Science at Your Library" program offered Wednesdays and Saturdays at the branch.
NEWS
By John Aloysius Farrell and John Aloysius Farrell,Boston Globe | January 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As a White House aide in 1971, Patrick J. Buchanan suggested in a memo to President Richard M. Nixon that efforts to integrate American society might only result in "perpetual friction" because blacks and the poor may be genetically inferior to middle-class whites.If research underscoring the role played by heredity in determining a person's IQ was found to be true, Mr. Buchanan wrote Mr. Nixon, "then it seems to me that a lot of what we are doing in terms of integration of blacks and whites -- but, even more so, poor and well-to-do, is less likely to result in accommodation than it is in perpetual friction -- as the incapable are played consciously by government side by side with the capable."
NEWS
May 3, 2000
FOUR YEARS ago, the animosity between St. Timothy's School and its immediate neighbors was so bitter that they could not even meet in the same room. Today, the relationship couldn't be better. St. Timothy's has sold its 90 surplus acres -- the source of the previous friction -- for development with the community's enthusiastic support. The difference? Both sides decided it was to their benefit to hammer out an agreement that allows the school to realize a return on its land but preserves its pastoral appearance.
NEWS
November 8, 2001
THIS IS where campaign talk is put to the test. Annapolis Mayor-elect Ellen O. Moyer said throughout the mayor's race that she'd be a consensus-builder if she were elected. And to some extent, she had earned that designation in a long civil and political career. But during the campaign, she failed to maintain collaborative relationships in some familiar quarters where her support should have been solid. Repairing those alliances - and forging new ones - will be the challenge for Ms. Moyer now that she has won. Before the election, Ward 1 Alderman Louise Hammond, a fellow Democrat, campaigned openly for Ms. Moyer's opponent, Republican Herbert H. McMillan.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 19, 2013
For all the years that they did battle in the clubhouse or the sports pages or on the dais of some charity roast, Jim Palmer knew how Earl Weaver really felt about him. That's why he had to hold back tears Saturday when he related his favorite memory of the Earl of Baltimore - a memory made more poignant because it also involved his late teammate Mike Flanagan. It was way back, on one of those balmy spring training days in Miami, when the Orioles were always one of the best teams in baseball and Palmer was their pitching ace. Flanagan, still figuring things out in his early 20s, was sitting on the bench next to Weaver.
NEWS
August 21, 2012
The increasing frequency of attacks on U.S. and NATO troops by members of the Afghan security forces they are supposed to be helping has reached the point where American commanders are rightly concerned that the mistrust engendered by such incidents threatens to interfere with the completion of their mission. That has prompted a shift in policy that may or may not work, but in any case it underscores the reality that the sooner our troops get out of Afghanistan the better off we'll be. So far this year 39 coalition soldiers have been killed in attacks by Afghan men wearing army or police uniforms.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 14, 2012
Back River isn't the only Baltimore area water body cluttered with used tires.  The Gunpowder River, arguably one of the region's most popular recreational water ways, has its share, too. Gunpowder Falls State Park draws anglers, kayakers, picnickers, swimmers and scads of tubers - so many, in fact, that friction has arisen over the transformation of the river through northern Baltimore County into what critics call a " superhighway of...
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 20, 2012
Since our story last week on the $65 million in unused sick/vacation/personal leave the Baltimore City school system has paid out in the past five years, I've been receiving feedback from several city teachers who said that there is a new order in town about the use of sick leave, and it has many worried. City educators have reported that in an effort to crackdown on teacher truancy, the district has directed that principals discourage teachers from using their sick leave, to the point where their absences could be reflected in their year-end evaluations.
NEWS
June 4, 2011
Anyone who wheels around downtown Baltimore knows that finding street parking can be a hassle. So one of the smart things the city did last week when it calmed the food truck kerfuffle was to set aside five downtown parking zones to accommodate the area's fledgling fleet of food trucks. The five zones — the east side 500 block of St. Paul Place and St. Paul Street, the south side of the 1900 block of East Monument Street, the south side of the 500 block of West Baltimore Street, the west side of the 300 block of South Charles Street and the north side of the 500 block of East Fayette Street — give the food trucks guaranteed spots between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Happy holidays? Not always. Not when you're forced to spend a few days cooped up inside with family members you may not get along with all that well, getting presents you don't need and giving away presents you spent too much money on. Maybe, you start thinking to yourself, Ebenezer Scrooge had the right idea. "People who seldom or never see one another during the year are thrown together in close proximity at family reunions during the winter holidays," says Johns Hopkins University Professor P.M. Forni, author of "The Civility Solution: What to Do When People are Rude," who teaches the history and theory of good manners.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 2005
The Supreme Court upheld the convictions of three men in a modern-day bootlegging case from Maryland yesterday, ruling 5-4 that the government could use U.S. wire fraud laws to prosecute a liquor smuggling operation that cost Canada millions of dollars in lost taxes. Brothers David and Carl Pasquantino and co-defendant Arthur "Butch" Hilts challenged their 2001 conviction, arguing that a centuries-old common law prohibiting the United States from enforcing the tax laws of another country should have blocked their prosecution.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Jen Bem | jenbem1@gmail.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
Aries 03.21-04.19 Neptune will make you susceptible to drama today. You have a low tolerance for other people’s crap, and you’ll let everyone know it. Taurus 04.20-05.20 You have a strong need to spend time with friends this evening. Sometimes you need a night to remind yourself that you still know how to have a good time. Gemini 05.21-06.21 If you’re feeling friction at work today, blame Mercury. The planet tends to aggravate situations, causing more trouble than you really need.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
There was no visible fallout at Ravens practice Tuesday, one day after the team was reprimanded by the NFL for offseason rules violations. The Ravens were disciplined after six players complained to the players union about late meetings and two others reported being held too long on the field after practice, according to coach John Harbaugh. These infractions occurred during the team's first voluntary passing camp in the middle of May, Harbaugh said. On Monday, the league resolved the grievance by forcing the Ravens to cancel next week's practices, which were the last ones of the offseason.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
The Baltimore Police Department has suspended a statistics-based management tool that has been a hallmark of the department for more than a decade, saying weekly information-sharing meetings had grown "stale" and "laborious." Using numbers and maps to spot problem areas, connect incidents and discuss tactics, police commanders and investigators had gathered in a room each Thursday for years as part of a process called Comstat. The concept has become a national law enforcement standard, and it was the inspiration for Gov. Martin O'Malley's acclaimed numbers-driven management programs.
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