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By GARRY WILLS | December 1, 1993
Chicago.--In the current movie ''Addams Family Values,'' the great Joan Cusack plays a killer nanny, a Bluebeard in reverse, marrying and murdering rich men. As so often, she saves the movie.What made this nanny so evil? Child abuse. Her parents gave her Malibu Barbie instead of Ballerina Barbie. This is a comic take on what has, in the news, been taking a tragic turn -- claims of child abuse remembered years later under the promptings of therapists.The practice is enough to help tarnish the whole psychoanalytic enterprise.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | January 14, 1996
"Intensity," by Dean Koontz. Alfred A. Knopf. 308 pages. $25 Less than 40 pages into "Intensity," the new thriller by Dean Koontz, the reader is treated to the scene of a young woman shackled to a bed, the prisoner of a serial killer who has already dispatched her parents, brother and sister-in-law. Overhead hangs a large portrait of Freud, for the victim, a psychology student, "clung to a belief in many aspects of Freudian theory; she embraced the dream of a guiltless world, with everyone a victim of his troubled past and yearning for rehabilitation."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Given how Gustav Mahler's music generated so much antipathy in his lifetime, with critics pulling out words like "grotesque" and many listeners suspecting the composer harbored horrid neuroses, it's not surprising that he decided to consult Sigmund Freud. But Mahler's famous four-hour meeting with the father of psychiatry in 1910 came about for somewhat less artistic reasons. "He was suffering from all these worries about his wife, Alma, running off with a younger man — which she did after Mahler died," said Marin Alsop, music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Sandy Hill and Sandy Hill,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 6, 1994
In six essays with a common thread, feminist Gloria Steinem returns to a more rigorous style of writing than marked her last book, "Revolution From Within: A Book of Self-Esteem.""Revolution," which some saw as pop psychology, received mixed reviews, but Ms. Steinem says many women told her how much it meant to them personally."Moving Beyond Words" explores in a more impersonal way how society restricts women and how they can break free. Only the final essay, "Doing Sixty," has the personal feel of "Revolution."
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Ms. Kobren is a copy editor at The Sun | September 20, 1992
FREUDIAN FRAUD: THE MALIGNANT EFFECT OF FREUD'S THEORY ON AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE.E. Fuller Torrey.HarperCollins.362 pages. $25.Theodore Dreiser, we are told, was the kind of man who would not only cheat on his mistress; he also "insisted" that she serve breakfast in bed to him and his other woman.Theodore Dreiser, E. Fuller Torrey also tells us, was the kind of man who thought Sigmund Freud was onto something.Now there's a neat little syllogism for you: Theodore Dreiser was a lout and a libertine.
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | November 28, 1993
Black horses gallop on the cobblestone streets. Lightning flashes through the rainy darkness to illuminate a swaying coach. Three shots ring out.All is not well in fin de siecle Vienna. The city's glittering era of artistic vibrancy and scientific discovery also is a time of political discord and societal unrest. The rich go to the opera and eat strudel; factory workers wrap broken boots in rags to keep out the cold. Furthermore, Vienna's women are dying -- some by their own hands, others at the hands of a killer who has taken to sending the baffled police teasing notes: "Where oh where is Gertrude Van De Vere?
NEWS
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
Sigmund Freud's theory about the workings of the human mind, psychoanalysis, does not accommodate a friendly adversary. "You're either for us or against us," his champions cry. Yet, that's what I am. A friend, because I've admired the therapeutic skills of many analysts and have tried to promote what they do best; an adversary, because I believe that psychoanalysis promised more than it delivered to my discipline, psychiatry, and has encouraged a nihilistic outlook...
NEWS
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | January 12, 1997
Psychotherapy, in all its guises, seems to be having a big-time identity crisis. Healing wounded minds and hearts has traditionally -- and paradoxically -- been the province of science, but as Harvard Magazine's cover story for January-February suggests, what Freud conceived was really more of an art. He pretty much admitted that himself.Psychoanalyst Alan A. Stone laments latter-day Freudians' failure to extend the master's vision: "Those who stand on Freud's shoulders have not seen farther, they have only seen differently -- and often they have seen less."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999
Erica JongJong fictionalized her marriage in her novel "Fear of Flying." Many considered the book a credit to women's sexual liberation; some considered it unacceptable.In "Serenissima," the protagonist travels back in time to visit Shakespeare and witnesses him making sexual acrobatics.In her book titled "Fanny" the main character spends time in a brothel and a witches' coven.Notoriety from books such as these lead people, as Jong's father put it, to call her a pornographer, but she later won the International Sigmund Freud Prize and became president of the Author's Guild.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
"This is a complete farce," says a character in Terry Johnson's "Hysteria." "If I saw it in the theater, I wouldn't believe it." You might feel the same if you catch the stylish Rep Stage production of this 1993 play at Howard Community College, but you're likely to find yourself absorbed, amused, even a little astonished, as well. "Hysteria" has a historical starting point, the 1938 meeting in London between the fatally ill Sigmund Freud and the fanatically self-absorbed Salvador Dali.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Some wag once quipped that all theater is an insane asylum, but opera is the wing for the incurables, so it seems fitting that Peabody Chamber Opera will present a new production this weekend of a 2002 work based on Sigmund Freud's Fragment of an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria. Dora, with music by Melissa Shiflett and libretto by Nancy Fales Garrett, explores the case of an 18-year-old patient of Freud. Ida Bauer, given the pseudonym Dora by Freud, exhibited symptoms of what qualified as hysteria in 1900, especially loss of speech, and the storied analyst naturally traced them to repressed sexual impulses.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
At the height of his frustration in the mid-1990s, then-Green Bay Packers general manager Ron Wolf let out a howl of exasperation that could be heard all the way to Dallas. "They could put seven helmets and four players out there and we'd find a way to fall over a helmet," Wolf said of the Cowboys. Wolf was worn down by an eight-game losing streak in a lopsided series. Three of the losses came in the postseason, the worst being the NFC championship game in January 1995. It wasn't until the season after the Packers won the January 1997 Super Bowl that they finally exorcised their Dallas demon and ended the streak.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 15, 2004
IN AN AGE when "reality TV" features people who swallow worms and an aging businessman whose most famous utterance is, "You're fired," true reality is expressed in a television show unlike any other you will see this season, or any season. The Question of God, airing on Maryland Public Television tonight and Sept. 22, creates a "debate" between Sigmund Freud, the atheist and founder of psychoanalysis, and C. S. Lewis, the eminent author, scholar and Christian apologist. The program is based on a popular course taught by Harvard professor Armand Nicholi.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999
Erica JongJong fictionalized her marriage in her novel "Fear of Flying." Many considered the book a credit to women's sexual liberation; some considered it unacceptable.In "Serenissima," the protagonist travels back in time to visit Shakespeare and witnesses him making sexual acrobatics.In her book titled "Fanny" the main character spends time in a brothel and a witches' coven.Notoriety from books such as these lead people, as Jong's father put it, to call her a pornographer, but she later won the International Sigmund Freud Prize and became president of the Author's Guild.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the dark hall at the Library of Congress, the curator's staff members gingerly take hold of the death mask of "Wolf Man," a plaster casting of one of Sigmund Freud's most famous patients.Studying how a small spotlight hits the narrow eyes and stubby mustache of the deranged man's final pose, the assistants position it forward and back, struggling to keep the mask from getting lost in the darkness of the case.But as the largest-ever exhibit on Freud's life's work is unveiled today at the library's Great Hall, it is really his ideas, not his artifacts, that are doing battle with the shadows.
NEWS
June 10, 1993
Americans have always been preoccupied with the good life In the 17th century, the Puritans fasted and prayed to find salvation. By the 20th century, science had displaced religion as arbiter of ultimate truths and the good life became a rational quest, pursued under the rubric of psychotherapy.Now, a century after Freud first propounded his theory of psychoanalysis, controversy rages over the benefits of the "talking cure." The sad spectacle of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow's messy custody battle is a case in point.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,special to the sun | August 4, 1996
"Feet of Clay: Saints, Sinners and Madmen: A Study of Gurus," by Anthony Storr. 288 pages. New York: Free Press. $23. "I detest a man," Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote, "who knows that he knows." "Feet of Clay" is full of the kinds of people Justice Holmes would have hated most. Anthony Storr is a practicing psychiatrist with a particular interest in men who "claim the possession of special spiritual insight based on personal revelation" and "promise their followers new ways of self-development, new paths to salvation."
FEATURES
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 1998
It's over, nobody wins" is a verse from a Sinatra ballad about a love affair gone sour that one could apply to America's intellectual love affair with Freudian doctrine. What W.H. Auden once described as a "whole climate of opinion" proved, with experience, to be an ideological blunder typical of this century, producing more victims than victories.Oxford's Isaiah Berlin, in a powerful essay on political ideas of the 20th century, saw it all coming in 1949 when he identified a crucial shift from 19th century views about human nature.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
Will Sigmund Freud ever finally be disposed of? If not, it won't be for want of people trying. Most recently Frederick Crews, a former English professor at the University of California, Berkeley put the boot in with his book, "The Memory Wars -- Freud's Legacy in Dispute," a criticism of Freud's continuing influence in the humanities.The ideas of the Viennese doctor who invented a new vocabulary to explain human behavior have been repeatedly debunked. The biologist P. B. Medawar dismissed psychoanalysis as an "intellectual confidence trick."
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