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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Fresh Fields, the fast-growing, Rockville-based chain of natural-foods supermarkets, is negotiating to open a store on the Mount Washington Mill property in northern Baltimore.The retailer, which has attracted widespread attention for selling organically grown produce and hormone-free meat in 25,000-square-foot stores, is interested in leasing and rehabilitating the mill's forge building off Smith Avenue, said Sam Himmelrich, who leads the mill's owners.No deal has been signed. But Fresh Fields wants to open a Baltimore-area store by the middle of 1995, said President Mark Ordan.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
"Since Affirmed in 1978" - it has to be the most overused phrase in thoroughbred racing. And yet it's inevitable every spring, when a new crop of 3-year-olds takes a shot at the sport's most cherished prize - the Triple Crown. Affirmed was the last to do it, 36 years ago, and the ensuing drought has coincided with a long downturn in popularity for racing. The sport's stakeholders have hungered for a new superstar, and a Triple Crown seems the surest way to make one. Which is where California Chrome enters the picture.
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NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | June 21, 1993
Fresh Fields, the "good for you" supermarket that opened in Annapolis Friday, will attract at least two kinds of people.There will be the health-conscious, eager to pay slightly more for products that are kind to the environment and contain no chemicals.And there will be the cooks, the culinary explorers, curious to make a dish with California kohlrabi, with jicama or Chayote squash or kumquats.The 25,000-square-foot store is certainly a visual feast, with huge banks of red, green, orange and yellow peppers, 150 cheeses, cored pineapples and fat persimmons.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
The meat counter is empty and the bakery shelves bare. The sushi station is oddly quiet, too. After 14 years of offering Pikesville shoppers fancy foods they couldn't find in regular groceries, Sutton Place Gourmet is closing its Woodholme Shopping Center location. The store, Sutton's only location in the Baltimore area, began selling nonperishables at a 30 percent discount Wednesday and expects to stop operations for good by Jan. 18. The gourmet grocer follows the fate of some other upscale retailers, such as Saks Fifth Avenue, that have left the area over the years.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1996
Fresh Fields Inc., a jazzy health-food supermarket chain that opened its first Baltimore store amid great fanfare last month, has been gobbled up by its natural-food nemesis, Whole Foods Market Inc., in a stock merger valued at about $135 million, the companies announced yesterday.As in banking, telecommunications and broadcasting, the two companies concluded that bigger is better."It made sense business-wise to sell, so they did," said analyst Matthew Patsky of Adams Harkness & Hill in Boston.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
When people ask Mark Ordan, president of Fresh Fields, who his competition is, he says anyone who sells food. Which means, he says, "I'm up all night."Cheer up, Mark. When your healthy foods supermarket opens next Wednesday in Mount Washington, it will do just fine. Not many of us Baltimoreans are natural food fanatics, but most of us like to eat healthfully if it tastes good and doesn't cost too much.Many of us are willing to pay a little more for beef that doesn't contain hormones; and it will be convenient to get very fresh fish at the same supermarket where we buy our cereal.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
Somewhere in Baltimore yesterday, someone may have eaten xTC a fried bologna sandwich on white bread. Or a salad of iceberg lettuce, winter-pink tomatoes and bottled Thousand Island dressing. Or nacho cheese Doritos, or double-filled Oreos. Or drunk two-liter bottles of Mountain Dew.But not, we trust, any of the several thousand who crowded the aisles of the Fresh Fields, the healthy foods supermarket that opened in the renovated Mount Washington Mill yesterday to sell organic kumquats, free-range chickens and a dizzying array of products that are variously, or sometimes cumulatively, sugar-, fat-, cholesterol-, dairy-, hormone-, phosphate- and cruelty-free.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,sun staff | June 14, 1998
It only seems perfect.The fruits and vegetables so unblemished they might be cast in wax. The free samples of farmer cheese, sweet red pepper pesto and pink vodka sauce arrayed just so with a basket of Crostini Tuscan Crackers. The floor shining like a dinner plate in the bright, airy market. The staff ever helpful and mellow - an Up With People cast on chamomile.The real and the ideal might appear to converge at Fresh Fields market in Mount Washington. Look closer, though. There's trouble in paradise.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
A few good reasons to attend last night's Singles Summer Fling at Fresh Fields Whole Foods Market in Mount Washington: No one goes home empty-handed. The free samples. You don't have to pretend you're reading a book. The proximity to Starbucks.But possibly the best reason to shop for a significant other in a grocery store is the ability to attend "undercover," as Mary Lloyd Dugan, a radiant professional storyteller, put it.You can make like you're just stopping after work to pick up a salad for dinner and stumbled onto the party (held due east of the sushi)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
I DON'T NORMALLY DO grocery store promotions but, by all means, beginning in December, buy milk at Fresh Fields' 17 stores in the mid-Atlantic region, including Baltimore, Annapolis, Bethesda and Rockville.It's an opportunity for all those who ever asked, "How can I help the bay?" to put their money where their mouth is. Look for the label Chesapeake Milk with the Environmental Quality Initiative symbol on the carton.You'll pay a nickel extra on each half-gallon, which for a family that went through, say, 2 gallons a week, would add a whopping 10 bucks a year to the food budget.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
They get lengthy readings from some people, barely a glance from others, and on a good day someone might stuff one into his or her pocket. They're the business cards tacked to bulletin boards found nearly everywhere - fitness centers, bagel shops, grocery stores, coffee boutiques. The Downtown Athletic Club in Baltimore has a board, as does the Fresh Fields store in Mount Washington, City Cafe on Cathedral Street and the Fly Shop, a barbershop in Harlem Park. The cards peddle a hodgepodge of services - massages, tailoring, hair care, magic shows, pet grooming, extermination.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 2, 2002
Downtown residents soon might have two new high-end grocery options. Construction on a Fresh Fields Whole Foods Market is set to begin this month at Inner Harbor East, according to Michael S. Beatty of H&S Properties Development Corp. And at Charles Plaza, a New York-based gourmet chain, Leo's Markets, plans to open a small grocery at the corner of Charles and Saratoga streets, said developer David H. Hillman. There are several Fresh Fields outlets in the Baltimore area, but Leo's will be a newcomer.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
Seth Goldman never expected to take on the likes of Lipton, Nestea and Snapple.But looking back, the 33-year-old former investment fund vice president can see how his varied experiences led to his founding Honest Tea, a Bethesda-based company that makes all-natural, barely sweetened bottled tea.After just 15 months, Honest Tea is being sold in about 800 supermarkets across the nation, among them Fresh Fields and Graul's Markets and, soon, Giant Food.As...
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
I DON'T NORMALLY DO grocery store promotions but, by all means, beginning in December, buy milk at Fresh Fields' 17 stores in the mid-Atlantic region, including Baltimore, Annapolis, Bethesda and Rockville.It's an opportunity for all those who ever asked, "How can I help the bay?" to put their money where their mouth is. Look for the label Chesapeake Milk with the Environmental Quality Initiative symbol on the carton.You'll pay a nickel extra on each half-gallon, which for a family that went through, say, 2 gallons a week, would add a whopping 10 bucks a year to the food budget.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,sun staff | June 14, 1998
It only seems perfect.The fruits and vegetables so unblemished they might be cast in wax. The free samples of farmer cheese, sweet red pepper pesto and pink vodka sauce arrayed just so with a basket of Crostini Tuscan Crackers. The floor shining like a dinner plate in the bright, airy market. The staff ever helpful and mellow - an Up With People cast on chamomile.The real and the ideal might appear to converge at Fresh Fields market in Mount Washington. Look closer, though. There's trouble in paradise.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 1998
FRIDAY is the big day for students at St. Martin's Lutheran Day School in Annapolis. That's when they find out if their suggestion for naming a new research ship passes muster with the Navy.St. Martin's is one of two finalists in a nationwide contest to name the Navy vessel. They suggested "Coriolis," after reading in school about the Coriolis effect -- a shift in wind direction caused by the rotation of the Earth.The students are up against a group of Cranston, R.I., elementary school students, who suggested that the new ship be named after American oceanographer Bruce Heezen.
NEWS
July 29, 1997
An item in the singles calendar of Thursday's Live section misidentified the sponsor of an event that benefits Bea Gaddy's Women and Children's Center. The event was sponsored by Fresh Fields.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/29/97
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
A few good reasons to attend last night's Singles Summer Fling at Fresh Fields Whole Foods Market in Mount Washington: No one goes home empty-handed. The free samples. You don't have to pretend you're reading a book. The proximity to Starbucks.But possibly the best reason to shop for a significant other in a grocery store is the ability to attend "undercover," as Mary Lloyd Dugan, a radiant professional storyteller, put it.You can make like you're just stopping after work to pick up a salad for dinner and stumbled onto the party (held due east of the sushi)
NEWS
July 29, 1997
An item in the singles calendar of Thursday's Live section misidentified the sponsor of an event that benefits Bea Gaddy's Women and Children's Center. The event was sponsored by Fresh Fields.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 7/29/97
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