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By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
Let's celebrate one of the sweetest corn seasons in memory with salsa for dipping and topping some of your favorite foods.Select corn picked in the morning because it is the coolest from the night air. First, look at the stalk end to identify a moist, full core, avoiding drier, shrinking stalks. Next, pull back the husk a -- little to expose the silk and kernels. The silk should be moist, almost sticky; kernels should be even in size and fullness. Avoid underdeveloped, shrunken kernels.Corn must be kept cool to remain sweet.
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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Sweet corn is at its seasonal peak, and its abundance is a great (and inexpensive) reason to get cooking. Sweet corn has a place in every cookout this time of year, whether in a salad, a side dish or, more likely, on the cob with butter and salt and pepper (or better yet, Old Bay). Jesse Albright, general manager at Albright farms in Monkton, sells sweet corn at the Fells Point Farmers' Market for $6 a dozen and offers preservation techniques for those of us who like to have a little bit of summer during the winter months.
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By TERESSA GUBBINS and TERESSA GUBBINS,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 16, 1997
Corn on the cob rates as one of life's perfect creations. Golden and beautiful, it's a model of nature's symmetry.Corn fanatic and cookbook author Betty Fussell calls it downright sexy."
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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE | June 3, 2006
My husband never met a steak he didn't like, but when it comes to fish, he falls into the picky-eaters category. When we were first married, I discovered that his curiosity was limited to shrimp and fried catfish - both staples of the South, where he grew up. But over the years I've introduced him to all manner of fish and seafood. What I've learned is that he likes just about any fish, as long as it has bold, vibrant flavorings. A perfect example of the type of seafood dish he now adores is Grilled Swordfish With Fresh Corn Salsa.
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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE | June 3, 2006
My husband never met a steak he didn't like, but when it comes to fish, he falls into the picky-eaters category. When we were first married, I discovered that his curiosity was limited to shrimp and fried catfish - both staples of the South, where he grew up. But over the years I've introduced him to all manner of fish and seafood. What I've learned is that he likes just about any fish, as long as it has bold, vibrant flavorings. A perfect example of the type of seafood dish he now adores is Grilled Swordfish With Fresh Corn Salsa.
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By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | August 23, 1992
In her book, "The Story of Corn," author Betty Fussell tells readers just about anything they might need to know about corn -- except how to cook it -- or not cook it, as the case may be. The original manuscript of the book contained recipes, but they didn't make the final cut.Sprinkled throughout, though, are vital bits of information about cooking with corn. For example, Ms. Fussell tells readers that from the moment it is plucked from the spiky stalk, corn's natural sugar begins converting to starch.
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By Copley News Service | July 14, 1991
Corn on the cob is available almost the year round, but there's no doubt that it's best during the season that practically is synonymous with fresh corn -- summer.Not all corn is table-ready. Basically, there are several classifications, including popcorn, field corn, ornamental corn and sweet corn. Popcorn kernels burst open when exposed to heat. Field corn is used for animal feed or dried for hominy. It also is ground to make masa harina, which is used for corn tortillas and tamales. Ornamental is the multicolored dried corn that is used in decorations.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 5, 2003
One dish I love to make at this time of the year is chili. This week, instead of making my usual version with ground beef, I opted for a variation. I replaced the meat with diced chicken breast, added some fresh corn kernels along with the beans, and used chipotle peppers in addition to a sprinkling of chili powder for seasoning. Easy to assemble, this chili took little time to prepare. Cubed chicken and chopped onions were quickly sauteed. Spices and tomatoes were stirred in. Finally, the mixture was simmered in chicken stock until the poultry was fork-tender.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | June 29, 1994
With thoughts gravitating to the grill for a Fourth of July menu, I hauled out some old recipe favorites. I last served Treasure Pocket Burgers for a casual grilling party and they drew raves and requests for doggie bags for the leftovers. There is a tasty little treasure of flavor moistening the center of the burger. I chose a combination of onion, mustard, capers, cheese and tomato for the center, but you can use your imagination or personal taste for the filling and also, if you are looking to reduce cholesterol, use ground turkey instead of ground beef.
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By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 5, 2003
One dish I love to make at this time of the year is chili. This week, instead of making my usual version with ground beef, I opted for a variation. I replaced the meat with diced chicken breast, added some fresh corn kernels along with the beans, and used chipotle peppers in addition to a sprinkling of chili powder for seasoning. Easy to assemble, this chili took little time to prepare. Cubed chicken and chopped onions were quickly sauteed. Spices and tomatoes were stirred in. Finally, the mixture was simmered in chicken stock until the poultry was fork-tender.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | March 2, 2003
Although my husband and I do not belong to a gourmet eating club, we do have a small circle of friends with whom we occasionally share potluck suppers. Our group follows no particular schedule. Instead, we assemble at random times of the year, when one of us proposes a date. Several days ago, I initiated a get-together to counter the midwinter blahs. I suggested that we collect at our house for a Friday night supper and, adding a new twist, that we watch a movie afterward. Our clan, made up of devoted movie fans, met this idea enthusiastically and chose the classic comedy Some Like It Hot as the evening's entertainment.
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By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
This is the time of year when vegetables assume starring roles in my menus. In late summer seductive produce is only minutes away from my house. At local roadside stands as well as at our town's weekly farmers' market, and even in my big chain neighborhood supermarket, I am tempted by the season's crops. Heirloom tomatoes, native corn, home-grown summer squash, countless varieties of beans, and potatoes of varying hues are irresistible, and that's just a short list. Cucumbers, peppers -- both sweet and hot -- arugula and other salad greens, and fennel are also among the local offerings.
NEWS
By Carrie Lyle and Carrie Lyle,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
The red metal wagon clattered behind my younger sister Katie and me as we made our way back from the cornfield at the end of our street. Our feet, leathery from running around barefoot all summer, slapped the warm concrete sidewalk, and the ears of corn we had just picked rolled from side to side in the wagon. "Look, Mom," Katie yelled, racing with me up our driveway. "We found some corn for dinner!" Mom looked down into our expectant faces, trying not to laugh. We had brought home field corn, ears with hard kernels meant for farm animals.
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By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
Everyone knows that if life gives you lemons, you make lemonade. But Sunkist has some other suggestions: Place votive candles in lemon shells and float them in an elegant, water-filled bowl. Use fresh lemon juice to clean copper pots. Fertilize roses or other plants needing acidity with lemon skins. Try lemon juice as an antidote to nausea. Grind lemon skins in the garbage disposal to keep it smelling fresh. Toss a little lemon peel into the fireplace for a zesty fragrance. Grilled corn needs a good soaking If your corn on the cob tends to dry out on the grill, you may need to get that corn wet behind the ears.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2005
Jessie Thomas of Ellicott City was looking for a recipe for corn fritters made with canned or frozen corn. Rita Gifford from Timonium sent in a recipe that her mother gave her back in the '50s, when she got married. She remembers her mother's making them throughout her childhood. These fritters are surprisingly light - almost like a corn pancake. They are not difficult to prepare if you don't mind the mess of frying in oil. This time of year, while the sweet corn is in season, I would make them using fresh corn and save the canned or frozen for winter.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 1998
This summer is a beaut. The weather is warm and the corn has been coming in like gangbusters.The first corn of the season tastes like a miracle. The earthy, grassy aroma of a just-stripped ear reminds us that nature not only renews itself, it frolics.The only way to eat corn in the early going, of course, is lightly steamed, heavily buttered and sprinkled with salt. But we're deep into the corn season now, and you're probably ready for fresh corn fritters with grilled shrimp and dollops of chipotle-spiked chevre.
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By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 1998
This summer is a beaut. The weather is warm and the corn has been coming in like gangbusters.The first corn of the season tastes like a miracle. The earthy, grassy aroma of a just-stripped ear reminds us that nature not only renews itself, it frolics.The only way to eat corn in the early going, of course, is lightly steamed, heavily buttered and sprinkled with salt. But we're deep into the corn season now, and you're probably ready for fresh corn fritters with grilled shrimp and dollops of chipotle-spiked chevre.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff | July 22, 1998
We dream about summer's lush bounty all winter long, counting the days until juicy tomatoes, sweet, sweet corn and oodles of zucchini and peppers bring happiness to our meals.Now, as the waves of produce roll in, we wonder what in the heck are we going to do with all of Mother Nature's largess?It's no wonder a holiday was created for the overload. Called "Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor's Porch Night," the Aug. 8 celebration - started in Mount Gretna, Pa., by gardener Thomas Roy - is catching on quickly around the nation.
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