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By Charlyne Varkonyi | November 3, 1991
When fall comes, everything seems to go on turbocharge. Suddenly, after those lazy days of summer, there are no longer enough hours in the day. There's football practice for the kids, night meetings for mom and dad. Everybody seems to be on a different schedule and wants to grab a bite somewhere else or eat at a different time.So what's the answer when even 30 minutes is too much time to cook?Sure, you can have everyone pick the TV dinner of his choice, but frozen food is not always the best quick fix. The following Fastlane Feast can be put together without even going to the grocery store if you have a well-stocked larder.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 26, 1995
More than 100 "Gourmet Gents" are warming up their !B saucepans in preparation for the third annual Gourmet Gents of Baltimore Taste Extravaganza next Sunday. Participants include Mayor Kurt Schmoke, chef Benny Gordon, Meldon Hollis, chair of the Urban League board, and Stuart O. Simms, Maryland secretary of juvenile justice. Dishes last year ranged from chicken salad to Louisiana-style gumbo.The event, which begins at 2 p.m. at Martin's West, Beltway and Security Boulevard, is organized by the Baltimore chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, and all proceeds benefit the advocacy group's community service programs.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 9, 2007
Twice in the past month, I've come across recipes for a "tomato crumble." A friend sent me one, and I discovered the other in a French cookbook. In both versions, diced tomatoes were seasoned with fresh herbs, covered with a combination of parmesan cheese and bits of butter, then baked. I found the idea of a tomato crumble so enticing that my mouth watered at the thought. I halved and seeded the juicy red orbs, then cut them into chunks and spread them in a baking dish. Next they were drizzled with olive oil and tossed with chopped basil and rosemary.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
When fresh tomatoes are abundant this summer - and we have consumed all we can in salads, on sandwiches, grilled and in salsas before their beauty fades - we will long to make tomato sauce. But there's a problem: For a classic lusty red pasta sauce, chefs actually tend to prefer canned tomatoes, says Richard Stuthmann, chief of instruction at Baltimore International College. Fresh tomatoes "aren't consistent," says Stuthmann, "and they aren't the red color we expect." So take a middle ground and combine the bounty of the farmers' market and the garden with tomato paste to make a quick marinara.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 15, 1993
With an investment of only a few minutes of time, you can jTC concoct this scrumptious, low-fat meal. The crunchy crown for the fish fillet seals in the juices and adds a lively nut and herb flavor. Any whitefish fillet will work for this dish as long as it is at least 3/4 -inch thick. Other suggestions are grouper, cod, red snapper or halibut.Spaghetti squash is a most interesting vegetable full of vitamins, especially beta carotene.When cooked, the delicate flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
"So, it looks like Farmer Emma is offering some extra tomatoes this week at the CSA," I said to my husband. "Can you grab a few while you are picking up our share at Moon Valley?" I kind of wish I had read Emma Williams' email to our CSA group a little more closely. In addition to our quart of tomatoes (and loads of vegetables), she was offering everyone another five pounds of tomatoes. I didn't realize how many that was until they were sitting in a colander on the kitchen countertop.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | August 20, 1995
Whether you grow summer vegetables or buy them at your local farmer's market or supermarket, they sing the flavors of the season. Here are recipes showcasing tomatoes, zucchini, corn and eggplant.*Tomato, Basil and Fresh Mozzarella SaladMakes 6 servings1 small red onion2 1/2 pounds vine-ripened tomatoes, sliced8 to 10 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced1/2 cup olive oil or extra-virgin olive oil3 tablespoons cider vinegargarlic salt to tastefreshly ground black pepper to taste1 cup fresh basil, cut into slender strips (see cook's notes)
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine | August 3, 1994
We are a nation of sandwich eaters, and so for this column the Eating Well Test Kitchen has assembled a fresh collection of recipes for our country's favorite portable lunch and patio supper. Some are variations of old favorites and some are brand-new combinations. Practically speaking, these sandwiches are quick and delicious. Better yet, they all take advantage of the wonderful summer produce found now in gardens and markets such as: succulent tomatoes, handfuls of fresh basil, fat bell peppers, garden cucumbers.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 5, 2002
For someone with a resume that includes work in the kitchens of the now-closed Pavilion at the Walters, the Polo Grill, Linwood's Due and Rothwells, chef Mark Hofmann's newest venture is something of a surprise. People who have followed Hofmann's career know that his specialty is casual food with a decidedly upscale accent. But when he opened his own restaurant, he settled on a neighborly place where he probably sells more hamburgers than grilled tuna nicoise. Henry's Bistro (named after Hofmann's son)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
A little of Little Italy -- that's what restaurateur David Cangialosi hopes he's bringing to downtown Baltimore. He opened Cangialosi's this week, next door to David & Dad's, the lunchtime eatery and carryout he has owned with his father since 1993. "I wanted Cangialosi's to be a really comfortable, warm, inviting place, and I want people in the neighborhood to come all the time," Cangialosi says. That's why he says he decided against the formality of tablecloths, instead opting for uncovered contemporary wood tables, set on the building's original hardwood floors.
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