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By MICHAEL DRESSER | April 19, 2006
Gruner veltliner is a little-known (outside Austria) but very fine white-wine variety, and this example is an excellent version at a reasonable price. It's a dry but fruity wine with penetrating flavors of lime, apple, sweet pea, fresh asparagus and minerals. Its aroma is very fresh and reminiscent of wet stone. Its finish is long and satisfying. Serve with white-fleshed fish, Southeast Asian cuisine.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | April 19, 2006
Gruner veltliner is a little-known (outside Austria) but very fine white-wine variety, and this example is an excellent version at a reasonable price. It's a dry but fruity wine with penetrating flavors of lime, apple, sweet pea, fresh asparagus and minerals. Its aroma is very fresh and reminiscent of wet stone. Its finish is long and satisfying. Serve with white-fleshed fish, Southeast Asian cuisine.
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FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | April 7, 1993
This menu has been planned as a solution -- or a quick fix, anyway -- for the aftermath of a holiday. A speedy stir-fry of leftover Easter ham is delicious teamed with springtime asparagus and baby carrot slivers. A dollop of creamy honey-tinged mustard sauce pulls the medley together over (possibly leftover) fluffy rice.Chunky applesauce gets added interest with some raisins that have been plumped with a little water in the microwave for two minutes and a dusting of cinnamon. For dessert, serve a purchased cake redolent of Easter's coconut.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 14, 2003
MY FAMILY HAS recently recovered from asparagus overload. This is a code-green condition that occurs when you have too many fresh asparagus spears in the fridge and only a few days to cook them before they lose their peak flavor. This particular outbreak was precipitated by an "error of enthusiasm" on my part. I bought way too much asparagus. I had an excuse. It was spring. It was the first farmers' market of the season. I was hungry. Because it was still early in the growing season, about the only homegrown items that the farmers were selling at the Sunday-morning market in downtown Baltimore were stalks of asparagus and a few bunches of rhubarb.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
Robins may be the first sign of spring for some folks, but fresh asparagus does it for me. That tender, sweet, pride of the lily family starts arriving from California as early as February, but Eastern asparagus is available from May through July. That means you'll probably find asparagus at its peak in your supermarket right now.Although asparagus has a pricey reputation, a little takes you a long way down the road to better nutrition. Just four medium spears count as one vegetable serving in your total of five fruits and vegetables a day. And remember, more than 100 research studies have shown that five-a-day people have lower risks for stroke, heart disease and both lung and colon cancer than people who eat fewer servings.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1996
Celebrate the freshness of spring with a simple but elegant meal that makes good use of pantry staples. The shining stars here are fresh asparagus and scallops.(An easy way to remember the difference between sea and bay scallop varieties: the largest of the two, sea scallops, come from the larger body of water, while the tiny bay scallops are found in the smaller bays.)Serve a salad of greens topped with thin slices of oranges and tomatoes. A honey-style salad dressing nicely complements the sweet and tangy salad.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | May 10, 1998
Like onions and leeks (the other edible members of the lily family), asparagus is botanically related to the grasses, which may be why it was called "sparrowgrass" in 18th-century England. Later, it was the English who invented tongs for serving asparagus (even though it was eaten with the fingers).Asparagus has even inspired its own piece of cookware: the asparagus steamer, a tall, lidded pot with a perforated liner or wire basket to hold the spears upright. The ends of the stalks simmer in a small amount of water while the tips steam.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,Orange County Register | April 7, 1993
Whether you like them reed-thin or as fat as cigars, fresh asparagus spears benefit from some simple care and proper timing in preparation.Begin by buying the vegetable from a good source.A busy store with lots of turnover is apt to have fresh asparagus. Natural sugars convert to starches quickly, so much of the fresh flavor is lost if the vegetable is stored too long.Look for spears displayed standing on end, preventing damage to the fragile crowns.If the vegetable is standing in a shallow pool of water -- which, as with cut flowers, is absorbed through the exposed stems to help preserve freshness -- that water should be clear and fresh.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | March 24, 1996
Fresh vegetables are one of the joys of spring, and tender asparagus spears are among the season's finest delicacies.According to the Food Lover's Companion by Sharon Tyler Herbst (Barron's, 1990), asparagus is a cultivated form of the lily family. The earliest stalks are apple-green with purple-tinged tips.Traditionally, the season for fresh asparagus has been February through June, but some specialty stores also have fresh asparagus at other times of the year.When buying asparagus, look for firm, bright spears with closed tips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | April 3, 1992
Our dinner at Foster's Oyster Bar, Restaurant and Market didn't start off in a promising way. I don't like being left waiting when I have reservations and the dining room is half-empty. I don't like it when waiters, no matter how pleasant, go past me and say Such-and such will be with you shortly but Such-and-such doesn't come. And I particularly don't like being seated, finally, at the very table I've been standing next to for 15 minutes.I also don't like it when I call for reservations, the person asks if I want smoking or nonsmoking, I say nonsmoking and we get seated in the smoking section.
FEATURES
By Ron Ottobre and Ron Ottobre,KNIGHT RIDDER /TRIBUNE | April 11, 2001
I was like a kid on Christmas morning when I headed into a meeting with my chefs recently. It was the passing of winter, however, not its climax, that had me so excited. And it was our gardener, not Santa, who held my wish list - an alphabetized cornucopia of spring produce that my chefs and I could now put on our menu. Asparagus, that edible lily, headed the list. The proud and pointed emblem of spring would at last grace our soups, appetizers, pastas and side dishes. But wait! The gifts continue: baby carrots, green garlic, heirloom beets, new potatoes, rhubarb, Romanesque broccoli and spring onions.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | May 10, 1998
Like onions and leeks (the other edible members of the lily family), asparagus is botanically related to the grasses, which may be why it was called "sparrowgrass" in 18th-century England. Later, it was the English who invented tongs for serving asparagus (even though it was eaten with the fingers).Asparagus has even inspired its own piece of cookware: the asparagus steamer, a tall, lidded pot with a perforated liner or wire basket to hold the spears upright. The ends of the stalks simmer in a small amount of water while the tips steam.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 27, 1997
Let's sit down to Thanksgiving dinner with:Dr. Laura Schlessinger:"Well, everything looks just lovely! But before we get started, let's clear up something. I hear a lot of whining this time of year -- much of it on my nationally syndicated radio talk show -- about the poor turkey."But here's the thing: the turkey chose to be a victim. You see what I'm saying? He didn't have to be a victim! He chose victimhood!"He could have said -- OK, turkeys don't talk -- but by body language, or whatever, he could have indicated: 'No!
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 1996
Celebrate the freshness of spring with a simple but elegant meal that makes good use of pantry staples. The shining stars here are fresh asparagus and scallops.(An easy way to remember the difference between sea and bay scallop varieties: the largest of the two, sea scallops, come from the larger body of water, while the tiny bay scallops are found in the smaller bays.)Serve a salad of greens topped with thin slices of oranges and tomatoes. A honey-style salad dressing nicely complements the sweet and tangy salad.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1996
Robins may be the first sign of spring for some folks, but fresh asparagus does it for me. That tender, sweet, pride of the lily family starts arriving from California as early as February, but Eastern asparagus is available from May through July. That means you'll probably find asparagus at its peak in your supermarket right now.Although asparagus has a pricey reputation, a little takes you a long way down the road to better nutrition. Just four medium spears count as one vegetable serving in your total of five fruits and vegetables a day. And remember, more than 100 research studies have shown that five-a-day people have lower risks for stroke, heart disease and both lung and colon cancer than people who eat fewer servings.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | March 24, 1996
Fresh vegetables are one of the joys of spring, and tender asparagus spears are among the season's finest delicacies.According to the Food Lover's Companion by Sharon Tyler Herbst (Barron's, 1990), asparagus is a cultivated form of the lily family. The earliest stalks are apple-green with purple-tinged tips.Traditionally, the season for fresh asparagus has been February through June, but some specialty stores also have fresh asparagus at other times of the year.When buying asparagus, look for firm, bright spears with closed tips.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 14, 2003
MY FAMILY HAS recently recovered from asparagus overload. This is a code-green condition that occurs when you have too many fresh asparagus spears in the fridge and only a few days to cook them before they lose their peak flavor. This particular outbreak was precipitated by an "error of enthusiasm" on my part. I bought way too much asparagus. I had an excuse. It was spring. It was the first farmers' market of the season. I was hungry. Because it was still early in the growing season, about the only homegrown items that the farmers were selling at the Sunday-morning market in downtown Baltimore were stalks of asparagus and a few bunches of rhubarb.
FEATURES
By John Edward Young and John Edward Young,Christian Science Monitor | April 20, 1994
Few things herald spring's arrival more than a robin's song, muddy boots, and fresh asparagus.Let's talk about the edible one.For perfect tenderness, rubber boots must be marinated for at least . . . (just seeing if you're with me).Slender, succulent and always in vogue, asparagus is considered an aristocrat among vegetables. This relative of the lily is no culinary newcomer. Still, its annual arrival is always eagerly anticipated.The tender green spears of sparrowgrass have been served since the days of the Caesars.
FEATURES
By John Edward Young and John Edward Young,Christian Science Monitor | April 20, 1994
Few things herald spring's arrival more than a robin's song, muddy boots, and fresh asparagus.Let's talk about the edible one.For perfect tenderness, rubber boots must be marinated for at least . . . (just seeing if you're with me).Slender, succulent and always in vogue, asparagus is considered an aristocrat among vegetables. This relative of the lily is no culinary newcomer. Still, its annual arrival is always eagerly anticipated.The tender green spears of sparrowgrass have been served since the days of the Caesars.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,Orange County Register | April 7, 1993
Whether you like them reed-thin or as fat as cigars, fresh asparagus spears benefit from some simple care and proper timing in preparation.Begin by buying the vegetable from a good source.A busy store with lots of turnover is apt to have fresh asparagus. Natural sugars convert to starches quickly, so much of the fresh flavor is lost if the vegetable is stored too long.Look for spears displayed standing on end, preventing damage to the fragile crowns.If the vegetable is standing in a shallow pool of water -- which, as with cut flowers, is absorbed through the exposed stems to help preserve freshness -- that water should be clear and fresh.
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