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June 28, 1998
For those who fear food poisoning: Someday, packages of frozen food may carry little gauges that certify the food inside is still fresh, just as battery packages carry indicators that show the batteries are fully charged.Scientists at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., have developed a package indicator that changes color when a package of food defrosts during shipment and then is refrozen. This provides a warning to consumers that the food may not taste fresh when prepared or might even harbor disease.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 10, 1993
Boston. -- The fog had fallen over the Labor Day coast like a curtain officially bringing down the summer season. We followed it south, bumper to bumper, riding from vacation to home, passing through tollgates that marked time off from time on.By the next morning, the curtain had lifted in one horizontal line onto a new scene and season. The country sounds of gulls and foghorns had been replaced by the urban sounds of cars, radios and alarms.To someone who will forever regard the first day of school as the real first day of the real new year, the city seemed momentarily in sync.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 1, 2014
CVS pharmacy, Chick-fil-A and Nalley Fresh will open locations at the Inner Harbor, joining Shake Shack and M&T Bank in a ground floor retail expansion at 400 East Pratt Street, the building's brokerage firm said today. The office tower's owner started expanding more than a year ago, renovating the lobby and working toward attracting shops and restaurants with outdoor seating. The landlord sought tenants that would be seen as amenities for office tenants as well as Inner Harbor workers and visitors, said David Leibowits, a partner of PDL Pratt Associates, the building's owner for more than 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2009
Among the attractions at the Shoppes at Shipley's Grant are a Starbucks, a Cold Stone Creamery and a Coal Fire pizza restaurant. Coal Fire is not a part of a chain - at least not yet - but I think most visitors would assume it is. It has the rosy suburban looks, streamlined menu and commitment to quality ingredients that customers have come to expect from fast-casual chains. Coal Fire is a project of the folks behind Nottingham's tavern, and they have obviously worked hard to develop this concept.
NEWS
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
Remember when mozzarella meant a brownish-yellow cheese that was low-moisture rubbery? A firm, cut-it-with-a-sharp-blade lasagna ingredient? Thanks to cheese pioneers such as Paula Lambert, now fresh mozzarella cozies up next to cheddar and Jack in the marketplace. Its soft texture and bedsheet-white appearance have become commonplace, sold refrigerated floating in whey-and-water baths in small plastic tubs. Twisted into braids, balls or knots, fresh mozzarella has musical, polysyllabic names like bocconcini, ovolini and ciliegini.
NEWS
By Tony Gambino and Tony Gambino,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
I remember, as a child, sitting on our kitchen counter top and watching Grandma Gambino create her homemade breads, sauces, pastas and homemade pizzas. The aroma would linger in our home. Her marinara sauce was heaven. Italian heaven. She would always start with the freshest, most ripe tomatoes. I can still see her squeezing the tomato seeds out by hand. She would add to the tomatoes a little fresh basil, onion, olive oil, oregano, garlic and her secret - a little fresh pureed carrot juice for sweetness.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | August 25, 1991
Face facts: Nothing beats fresh fruit as a healthy dessert. It's ++ low in calories and sodium, high in fiber and vitamins, has no cholesterol and is naturally sweet.A perfectly ripe fruit can taste as delicious -- well, almost as delicious -- as a rich chocolate-filled, butter-laden flaky pastry. The trouble is that fruit rarely seems special or festive. Yet no rule requires fresh fruit to be dull. A little imagination and ingenuity transform fruits to treats.Simplest is sliced fresh fruit artfully arranged on a beautiful platter.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 6, 1995
When other people say things you agree with, they are brilliant. That is how I felt about Molly O'Neill recently after spending time with the New York Times food writer and author of "A Well-Seasoned Appetite" (Viking, $26).We agreed the way to live a happy life is to buy fresh food, cook it with care, and eat it in a pleasant setting surrounded by friends or family. The dictum may sound simple, but putting it into practice often requires effort.Beeping frozen chicken dinners in a microwave oven is, for example, easier than taking the time to prepare a supper of lime-marinated chicken served on top of fresh, creamed corn.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 1998
FRESH PRODUCE is one of the glorious benefits of summer and can be found at Sykesville Farmers' Market, which began operating two weeks ago.The market is held in the parking lot of Baldwin's Station Restaurant in downtown Sykesville, off Route 32. Fresh strawberries, peas, perennial flowers and seeds, honey, and other early spring crops can be found at the market. Garden statuary and decorative stone products also are available.Seven local vendors offer produce and products, and the number is expected to grow as more farmers and growers bring fresh-picked crops to the market.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Orioles left-hander Zach Britton won't lie about it. Yes, in the past year, he considered what it would be like to wear a different uniform, to get a second chance elsewhere. Heading into last fall, Britton had struggled through consecutive rocky seasons in which a shoulder injury, lack of command and cracking confidence had thrust him into a career crossroads. Once considered a future ace, Britton weathered a brutal final month last season, pitching poorly in a spot start against the Cleveland Indians before being jettisoned to instructional league while his teammates were fighting in a pennant race.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
If you think the Ravens are being coy about their running back situation, Lorenzo Taliaferro wants to let you in on a little secret. Offensive coordinator Gary Kubiak doesn't let the players know in advance how he'll divvy up the carries on game day, either. "He doesn't really tell us who's going to go in during the week," said Taliaferro, the Ravens' rookie running back. "[It's] … whoever they call and put in. We'll all step out there and get the job done. " There remains a shroud of mystery about the Ravens' running game as they face the Carolina Panthers Sunday afternoon at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One-fourth of the names on Maryland's sex offender registry could be removed after the state's top court expanded Monday on an earlier ruling that adding offenders from before the list was created violated the state constitution. The Court of Appeals declared last year that the state could not require the registration of people who committed their crimes before October 1995, when the database was established. State officials removed the one name in question in that case but maintained that federal law required them to keep older cases in the database.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mobile technology is changing the way we communicate, shop, work and travel. Ride-sharing companies such as Uber are bringing much needed choice and competition to a stagnant taxi industry that has failed to advance with the times ( "Uber to file long appeal of Maryland proposal to regulate it as taxi operator ," May 29). Unfortunately, Maryland regulators have also failed to modernize the antiquated policies that restrict access to convenient, affordable transportation options and increased economic opportunities.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Nalley Fresh will open locations this summer in Timonium and Canton. These will be the fourth and fifth locations, respectively, for Nalley Fresh, a locally owned restaurant specializing in customer-designed salads, wraps and rice bowls. Conceived by Greg Nalley, a former head chef at Pimlico Race Course, the first Nalley Fresh opened on Calvert and Baltimore streets in March 2012. A Hunt Valley location was added later the same year and a Towson location this spring. The Timonium location, which will be at the Timonium Shopping Center on York Road, and the Canton location, which will occupy the former DAP Products office in the Can Company, will be the first Nalley Fresh spots to offer dinner service and to be open seven days a week, according to Nalley.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
I am sure I speak for most Marylanders when I say that Attorney General Doug Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown have let us down with their bickering and mudslinging and dirty political tactics throughout this gubernatorial campaign. I can't go a day without seeing an outrageously obnoxious ad on TV or receiving a slimy flier in the mail. It doesn't have to be this way. On the contrary, Del. Heather Mizeur has been a breath of fresh air since day one. She has remained positive, even at moments it might have been easy to take a cheap shot at her opponents.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2007
The music season could end right now and I wouldn't complain much, because I could bask indefinitely in the afterglow of hearing Ben Heppner sing "Roses of Picardy" Sunday night. The tenor's performance of that wistful song from 1916, the third and final encore in his fabulous recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, sent me out into the drizzly air on a rare high. I admit I'm an easy pushover for old ballads like "Roses of Picardy," one of the most beguiling of World War I-era songs, but it takes an uncommon singer to make them sound fresh and substantive today (or to even think of performing them)
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | December 15, 1999
* Item: Dole Great Restaurant Salads* What you get: 2 1/2 servings* Cost: About $3* Preparation time: Open bag and serve* Review: I'm definitely a fan of pre-cut salad greens. But I'm not sure these new bagged salads from Dole are worth the price. The Triple Cheese Toss consisted of mixed greens with a small envelope of grated cheese you could just as easily come up with yourself -- even if it was pre-grated from a can in your refrigerator. No other dressing was included. The Mediterranean Marinade offered a similar mix of greens with a dressing spiked with peppers and mushrooms that honestly tasted more like a thick marinade.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - California Chrome co-owner Steve Coburn spent the past five weeks captivating America with his folksy charm and a shoot-from-the-hip style that seemed refreshing until he shot himself in the foot on Saturday. Instead of expressing his great pride in a low-budget horse that captured the imagination of the nation and nearly became the first horse in 36 years to win horse racing's Triple Crown, Coburn blasted the format that forced his horse to face several Kentucky Derby rivals who rested through the Preakness and crowned a new Belmont Stakes champion who had not run since May 10. He called the strategy "a coward's way out" during a nationally televised interview that wasn't folksy or charming.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
"Since Affirmed in 1978" - it has to be the most overused phrase in thoroughbred racing. And yet it's inevitable every spring, when a new crop of 3-year-olds takes a shot at the sport's most cherished prize - the Triple Crown. Affirmed was the last to do it, 36 years ago, and the ensuing drought has coincided with a long downturn in popularity for racing. The sport's stakeholders have hungered for a new superstar, and a Triple Crown seems the surest way to make one. Which is where California Chrome enters the picture.
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