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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
My dad died 14 years ago, and there isn't a day goes by I don't wish there was some way I could talk to him. In "Frequency," an enjoyably complex sci-fi suspense thriller from director Gregory Hoblit ("Primal Fear"), New York police officer John Sullivan (Jim Caviezel) is given just that opportunity. Thanks to some huge sunspots, an overactive aurora borealis and what must be the most powerful vacuum tubes ever manufactured, Sullivan is able to reach back three decades and maybe a parallel universe or two and talk via ham radio with his firefighter dad, Frank (Dennis Quaid)
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Morgan State football coach Lee Hull has been seeing a little bit too much yellow for his liking. The Bears (2-2, 1-0 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) nipped league rival Howard, 38-35, on Saturday, but not without drawing 10 penalties costing them 104 yards. It marked the third time this season that Morgan State incurred more penalties than its opponent. The team is averaging 8.5 penalties per game for an average loss of 77.5 yards. “I'm real concerned because that shows a lack of focus and a lack of discipline,” Hull said this week.
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NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Consella A. Lee and Scott Wilson and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
Hard against Baltimore-Washington International Airport, a neighborhood of tightly packed brick homes and basketball hoops is the subject of a debate inside the Federal Aviation Administration with national implications.At issue is a new variety of jet noise first documented by airport engineers in September 1995. They found that, unlike most neighborhoods rimming major airports hit by high-frequency noise from jets passing overhead, homes along Allwood Drive were buffeted by low-frequency blasts from planes taking off.The finding has significant implications: A $25 million soundproofing program run by the Maryland Aviation Authority with federal assistance is not effective in eliminating jet noise for the 82 homes in the area.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
City officials are poised to pay a New York-based firm $286,000 to redesign and host Baltimore government's website. The Board of Estimates is slated to vote Wednesday on a proposal to hire Interpersonal Frequency LLC to overhaul the city's site. The city's former chief technology officer began a redesign and overhaul of Baltimore's government website in 2012, but left the task unfinished, city officials have said. Interpersonal Frequency, which was among eight bidders for the job, worked with Baltimore's current Chief Technology Officer Chris Tonjes at his previous job at Washington D.C.'s library system.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
A ripple of indignation spread across the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday over news that its student-run radio station, which has been broadcasting since 1937, might be unceremoniously forced off the air by a more powerful station in Baltimore. The college station, WMUC, issued an appeal to alumni to help it retain its signal, currently powered by just 10 watts and available within a radius of only a few miles of the 1,200-acre campus. University officials said they had met with lawyers to determine the station's legal options.
NEWS
December 26, 1996
WHEN PEOPLE think of airport noise, they typically think of the piercing high-frequency screech of jet engines.Residents of the Allwood neighborhood, just east of Baltimore-Washington International Airport in northern Anne Arundel County, find they are disturbed more by the low-frequency variety, which rattle and shake their houses several times an hour.Unfortunately for about 80 Allwood families, until recently most airport noise suppression programs were oriented only toward the high-frequency sound waves.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
The Department of Defense has appealed for ideas to help in the fight against terrorism. Officials said they want innovative ideas from sources that might otherwise not have access to the Pentagon - small companies and individuals with imaginative solutions. This idea of the national equivalent to the office suggestion box drew jibes from some quarters. A Washington columnist for the New York Times laughed at the idea of "every Tom, Dick and Goofball" becoming national security consultants.
NEWS
February 1, 1998
A headline and article in Thursday's Howard County edition of The Sun mischaracterized a proposal for a local bus service. The proposal entails placing limits on the frequency of reserved-service trips but does not involve a reduction in service.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/01/98
NEWS
October 17, 1998
Because of inaccurate information provided The Sun, an article Wednesday about the abrupt departure of radio talk-show host Art Bell from the airwaves listed an incorrect frequency for Washington radio station WWRC. The station can be heard at AM 570.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/17/98
NEWS
December 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The County Commissioners on Thursday took a step toward clearer emergency communications.At the request of the members of the Communications Advisory Board, the commissioners agreed to write a letter of intent to the Federal Communications Commissions, stating that they will be interested in any high-frequency channels that open up in the future.The move is the first step in a plan that would change the county's current low-band emergency communication system into a $5.5 million, 800 megahertz system that is designed to ensure clear communications and eliminate the current system's problems of interference.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
The Maryland Public Service Commission said Monday that it will give energy customers a choice on smart meters, but it hasn't decided yet whether to allow a total opt-out or to make the alternative a smart meter installed in a way to limit radio-frequency emissions. "Although we have not found convincing evidence that smart meters pose any health risks to the public at large, we acknowledge a good-faith belief on the part of some ratepayers to the contrary," the commission said in its order.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Anne Arundel County residents would see their property taxes increase under the $1.2 billion budget proposed Monday by County Executive John R. Leopold, but that would be partially offset by a drop in trash pickup frequency and fees. County workers, meanwhile, would see an end to furloughs but receive no raises. Leopold's spending plan for the year that begins July 1 includes boosting the tax rate from 91 cents to 94.1 cents per $100 of assessed value. For a home with an assessed value of $261,200, the forecast countywide average, taxes would go up by about $128 for the year, officials said.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | January 7, 2012
Along with Europe's financial crisis, Middle East unrest and sluggish U.S. growth, mutual-fund seller T. Rowe Price has identified a 2012 economic risk you probably haven't thought about. Every day, Wall Street firms armed with secret software bombard stock exchanges with thousands of electronic orders. Shares are bought and sold in milliseconds. The firms have zero interest in investing for the long term - or more than an eye blink, for that matter. Their computers seek trading irregularities to generate profit of a fraction of a penny per share.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
The next time Ana Ferguson and her husband lose power for an extended period, they will be prepared. The Pikesville couple bought a generator after five nights without electricity in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene. "We had to do it because we can't rely on BGE to put the lights on and keep the lights on," Ferguson said. While Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. took the brunt of criticism from customers and public officials for its pace of power restoration after the late-August storm, other utilities around the state also have come under fire in recent years for poor customer service, frequent outages and other reliability concerns.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
Just as waterfowl migrate and fish swim upstream to spawn, the Chesapeake Bay regularly witnesses another predictable rite of passage - governors and mayors making bold promises to reverse decades of water pollution and restore the nation's largest estuary at some future date. One can only contemplate what native instinct drives these intrepid visitors. But they always perform with great vigor and seemingly little awareness of the generations of forebears who have done exactly the same thing.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 9, 2008
Baltimore's busy public ambulance service went out on more than 150,000 calls last year, responding to everything from car accidents to heart attacks. About 2,000 of those calls were from the same 91 people. The breakdown: 38 people called between 15 and 20 times each, 37 called between 21 and 40 times, 13 rang up between 41 and 60 times, and two connected over 60 times. The high scorer called 107 times. Officials fear the high frequency of calls from a small number of people means this group is using 911 because they lack transportation or insurance - and the result is worse care for them and higher costs for the city.
FEATURES
November 6, 1990
If you work regularly with art or craft materials that are toxic, be aware of symptoms that might show your susceptibility to various chemicals. According to "Safe Practices in the Arts and Crafts: A Studio Guide," you should be suspicious if:* you develop asthma as an adult. Asthmas beginning in adults almost invariably come from environmental contaminants.* your symptoms are worse when you work -- especially after long sessions -- and improve when you stay away from your studio.* you have an increase in the frequency or severity of your respiratory infections, especially those in which you are short of breath.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | April 15, 1993
The big band sound of radio station WITH-AM (1230), which listeners had feared would fade away with a change in ownership, will keep on swinging in Baltimore, but at a different station.Beginning at 6 a.m. Monday with "The Alan Field Show," the "Station of the Stars" format will move to WHLP-AM (1360), Jim Ward, general manager of WITH, announced yesterday.All current personalities on WITH -- Mr. Field, Ken Jackson, Wayne Gruen, sports-talk announcer Nestor Aparicio and Fred Robinson -- will be heard at approximately their usual times on the new station.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Howard Reith repeatedly clicks on his garage door opener. Up close. Farther away. Moves it back and forth, but the door refuses to budge. And he's not alone. In his Harford County neighborhood, electric garage doors suddenly don't work the way they used to. Blame the new radio system at Aberdeen Proving Ground. If this is a showdown of military technology versus consumer gadgetry, it is, not surprisingly, no contest. APG's new radio signals are overpowering the meager, fraction-of-a-watt ones emitted by garage door openers.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | August 16, 2007
ATLANTA -- Crawling around his college newspaper office on a fruitless search for his flash drive, Josh Weiss learned a tough lesson in data recovery: When you lose a device smaller than a stick of gum, it's unlikely you're going to find it. Lucky for Weiss, a senior at the University of Georgia, the tiny portable memory drive that fell off his key chain contained just a few files for a forthcoming edition of his newspaper. "An inconvenience," he said of the loss. Flash drives, which slide into a computer's USB port and can hold thousands of documents, songs and pictures, increasingly are becoming a security risk on college campuses.
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