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By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2000
If Reason and Science had prevailed, there would be no foolishness about whether the millennium begins today or a year from now. It began a little more than 207 years ago on the First of Vendemiaire, Year I of the Republic. Alas, Superstition and Clericalism triumphed instead -- or perhaps it was the human resistance to change -- and so we continue to be enslaved by a time-keeping system associated with pagan and Christian supernaturalism. Rare is the child of the Enlightenment whose calendar marks today as 9 Nivose CCVIII.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
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FEATURES
January 21, 2008
Jan. 21 1793 During the French Revolution, King Louis XVI, condemned for treason, was executed on the guillotine.
NEWS
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,Los Angeles Times | March 9, 2008
PARIS -- Felix Wu faces an uphill fight in today's election to govern a neighborhood that includes this city's Chinatown. As his name suggests, Wu is of Chinese descent and, indeed, he says he's running to represent the Asians of the 13th arrondissement, or district. This might sound routine to Americans used to immigrants breaking into politics through their ethnic identity. But in France, Wu is seen as a revolutionary - or more accurately, a counter-revolutionary. For the more than 200 years since the French Revolution, this country has declared that distinctions of race or creed must be submerged for the good of France.
NEWS
July 15, 1997
Francois Furet,70, a historian whose groundbreaking approach to the French Revolution earned him an international reputation, died Sunday at a hospital in Toulouse, France. He had fallen while playing tennis July 8, struck his head on the tennis court, quickly lost consciousness and never came out of a coma.A professor at the University of Chicago since 1985, Mr. Furet was the first major historian in France to challenge orthodox Marxist interpretations of the French Revolution, which saw the 1789 upheaval as the result of a class struggle between the discontented bourgeoisie and the nobility.
NEWS
January 24, 1996
Joseph S. Bruno, 83, who built a tiny downtown grocery store into a $3 billion grocery and pharmacy chain that included the Piggly Wiggly and Food Fair supermarkets, died Sunday in Birmingham, Ala.He and his brother Sam opened their first grocery store in 1932 with an initial investment of $600. The business eventually expanded into a chain of 254 supermarkets along the East Coast with more than 27,000 employees.The chain, which operated stores under such names as Bruno's, Food Max and Food World, was sold last year in a $1.15 billion buyout.
NEWS
October 21, 1992
The shake-up of China's ruling elite clears out lingering opposition to the policies of Deng Xiao-ping. His chosen heirs dominate the central committee and the politburo plus its standing committee. After the 14th Communist Party Congress of China, it is full throttle on capitalist economic development but total commitment to Communist Party political power: economic freedom, yes; political freedom, no -- for as long as Mr. Deng shall live. The frail leader did not appear at the congress he dominated, but did make one brief public appearance afterward, if only to prove that he does live.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 24, 1994
Paris -- A leader of the New Year's Day rebellion in southern Mexico, who calls himself ''Major Mario,'' gave the following answer to questions about links to the ''Shining Path'' movement in Peru:''I have read Mao Tse-tung, but I am not a Maoist, and our organization is not socialist. We want democracy, elections without frauds, land for the peasants, decent houses, medical care, schools. We want to be treated like human beings -- to eat meat like everyone else. It's as simple as that.''It is difficult to think of a European or Asian revolutionary in the 20th century who would have spoken quite those words.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 9, 2004
Arrogance and religious hypocrisy, revolutionary fanaticism, spies and lies, wrongful imprisonment, beheadings - times haven't changed all that much since the Reign of Terror in 1790s France, have they? That's the main point behind Washington National Opera's season-opening production of Umberto Giordano's Andrea Chenier, one of the major works in the verismo - realism - style that first electrified audiences at the end of the 19th century. You can count on a few extra realistic flourishes in this staging, which was devised by Mariusz Trelinski, the Polish film, theater and opera director responsible for the highly imaginative, often insightful and just plain riveting version of Puccini's Madama Butterfly presented by Washington National in 2001.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
America's richness of literary culture is brillantly demonstrated in the cornucopia of accomplished fiction being published this autumn. Jewels of the harvest, any one would be a treasure at the toe of a Christmas stocking.Allegra Goodman's "The Family Markowitz," (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 262 pages, $22), a series of stories about one Jewish family, offers a startingly fresh approach to a subject seemingly exhausted by Philip Roth. But no, here come the Markowitzes, a clan charming, exasperating, limited, profound, and surprising, not least the matriarch Rose.
FEATURES
January 21, 2008
Jan. 21 1793 During the French Revolution, King Louis XVI, condemned for treason, was executed on the guillotine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 9, 2004
Arrogance and religious hypocrisy, revolutionary fanaticism, spies and lies, wrongful imprisonment, beheadings - times haven't changed all that much since the Reign of Terror in 1790s France, have they? That's the main point behind Washington National Opera's season-opening production of Umberto Giordano's Andrea Chenier, one of the major works in the verismo - realism - style that first electrified audiences at the end of the 19th century. You can count on a few extra realistic flourishes in this staging, which was devised by Mariusz Trelinski, the Polish film, theater and opera director responsible for the highly imaginative, often insightful and just plain riveting version of Puccini's Madama Butterfly presented by Washington National in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
The corporate mea culpas from CBS, MTV and Viacom Inc. took up more time than their infamous and seemingly eternal halftime show at the Super Bowl last week. That, of course, was when, for a fleeting moment, one of singer Janet Jackson's breasts was exposed. This prompted a torrent of protests ranging from official Washington to shrill talk-show hosts to viewers to, of course, an indignant National Football League, even though it has never tired of trying to make the Big Game bigger than life itself.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2000
If Reason and Science had prevailed, there would be no foolishness about whether the millennium begins today or a year from now. It began a little more than 207 years ago on the First of Vendemiaire, Year I of the Republic. Alas, Superstition and Clericalism triumphed instead -- or perhaps it was the human resistance to change -- and so we continue to be enslaved by a time-keeping system associated with pagan and Christian supernaturalism. Rare is the child of the Enlightenment whose calendar marks today as 9 Nivose CCVIII.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 1999
"Andrea Chenier" is Umberto Giordano's only opera in the international repertory. It is supposed to owe its popularity to star tenors who are attracted to the title role's passion and heroism.So much for the apparent reputation of "Chenier." The truth is rather different, as Thursday's opening performance of the Baltimore Opera's production of the opera demonstrated. This operatic treatment of events in the French Revolution is an ambitious work with a classic triangle of sensitive heroine, rebellious hero and menacing baritone.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 1998
TUESDAY WAS Bastille Day. And, in honor of the occasion, the Savage librarians celebrated the French Revolution.As part of the celebration, the staff asked for a contribution from Bonaparte Breads -- the authentic French bakery in Savage Mill.What a good idea!It happens that master baker Pierre Lefilliatre bears a strong resemblance to Napoleon Bonaparte.Lefilliatre brought four dozen little pains elegantes -- elegant breads -- for participants to consume.He owns an accurate Napoleonic-era uniform, which he wore to the presentation.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 23, 1995
Paris. -- A reader has challenged my recent remark that it is cant to hold that democracies do not go to war with one another. He says, instead, that this is an ''empirically verified'' truth and a major discovery of political science.The issue is significant because the idea that democracies do not fight one another not only is taken for granted in Washington but provides such guiding intellectual principle as can be discerned in the foreign policy of the Clinton administration.It is the reason Washington continues even now to back Boris Yeltsin in Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
The corporate mea culpas from CBS, MTV and Viacom Inc. took up more time than their infamous and seemingly eternal halftime show at the Super Bowl last week. That, of course, was when, for a fleeting moment, one of singer Janet Jackson's breasts was exposed. This prompted a torrent of protests ranging from official Washington to shrill talk-show hosts to viewers to, of course, an indignant National Football League, even though it has never tired of trying to make the Big Game bigger than life itself.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 1997
NEW YORK -- Monday is usually a slow night, but yesterday Harry's was full and rowdy. After all, it is the last bar between Wall Street and the mouth of the East River, a stretch of water from which the Coast Guard routinely pulls dead bodies."
NEWS
July 15, 1997
Francois Furet,70, a historian whose groundbreaking approach to the French Revolution earned him an international reputation, died Sunday at a hospital in Toulouse, France. He had fallen while playing tennis July 8, struck his head on the tennis court, quickly lost consciousness and never came out of a coma.A professor at the University of Chicago since 1985, Mr. Furet was the first major historian in France to challenge orthodox Marxist interpretations of the French Revolution, which saw the 1789 upheaval as the result of a class struggle between the discontented bourgeoisie and the nobility.
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