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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Emma J. Hawkins, a member of the French Resistance and French army during World War II who later became a Howard County schoolteacher, died Aug. 1 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lookabout Manor, a Westminster assisted-living facility. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 92. Emma Josephine Guillot was born and raised in Grenoble, France. "Her father was an engineer and math professor who believed in education. She graduated from colleges and universities in France and Spain as well as an art school," said her son, Paul B. Hawkins of Finksburg, a retired Baltimore police officer.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 2, 2012
Historians note the American alliance with King Louis XVI sustained the American cause during the darkest days of the Revolution. The history is impossible to escape. But for the deal struck in February 1778, General Washington and his Continental Army would likely not have survived. Nevertheless, and despite a successful alliance in two world wars, taking the French to task has become a popular American sport. French resistance to U.S. foreign policy moves is one reason.
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NEWS
March 17, 2007
LUCIE AUBRAC, 94 French Resistance leader Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a hit film, died Wednesday in Paris. Born on June 29, 1912, in the eastern city of Macon, Ms. Aubrac was a history and geography teacher when she and her husband, engineer Raymond Samuel, helped create Liberation-Sud, or Liberation-South. Liberation-South was one of the first networks set up by the Resistance, a French movement to continue warfare against Germany after France's 1940 defeat in World War II. The couple adopted the nom de guerre Aubrac in the Resistance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Georges I. Selzer, who cheated death twice while a concentration camp prisoner and who after World War II became a Baltimore jeweler, died Oct. 17 of heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Lutherville resident was 99. Mr. Selzer, who was born, raised and educated in St. Gallen, Switzerland, settled in France in 1927, when he became an apprentice jeweler. When the Nazis seized power, Mr. Selzer's father told him he was not to disguise his Jewishness.
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Maurice Bourges-Maunoury, 78, a leader of the French resistance who later held several Cabinet posts, died Wednesday in Paris. He joined the French army as an artillery lieutenant in 1939, was captured by the Germans in 1940 and was set free the next year. He joined the resistance and made repeated clandestine trips between France and Britain. When the allies launched the D-Day invasion, he parachuted into southern France to organize a sabotage campaign. After the war, he won a parliamentary seat for the Radical Party in 1946 and became deputy budget minister in 1947.
NEWS
January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
For a film about passion and freedom and the unwillingness to sacrifice either, "Lucie Aubrac" sure is quiet.Based on the writings of real-life freedom fighter Lucie Aubrac, the film follows French Resistance members Raymond Samuel and his wife, Lucie Bernard (their pseudonyms were Raymond and Lucie Aubrac), as they fight against the German occupation, are separated, then struggle to re-unite. It's a grand and touching story that wrestles with one of the most controversial issues of modern French history -- could citizens be forgiven for trying to work with the Nazi occupation -- while also showcasing how brave (and resourceful)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 24, 2011
Georges I. Selzer, who cheated death twice while a concentration camp prisoner and after World War II became a Baltimore jeweler, died Oct. 17 of heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Lutherville resident was 99. Mr. Selzer, who was born, raised and educated in St. Gallen, Switzerland, settled in France in 1927, when he became an apprentice jeweler. When the Nazis seized power, Mr. Selzer's father told him he was not to disguise his Jewishness.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1994
Doe-eyed and fond of dances and movies, 20-year-old Simone Deutsch heard the whispers that the tumult on the far-off Normandy coast might be the Allied landing everyone in France had anticipated for months.At first, Simone was not ready to believe it. Four years of Nazi occupation had hardened her carefree spirit. She could not be certain the landing was real. Nor could she know that it was also to bring her an American husband, John "Sam" Allsup, a lieutenant in the 29th Infantry Division who was slogging his way across the beach at Normandy.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and William Thompson and Carl Schoettler and William Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondents | June 7, 1994
In an photo caption on Page 1A in Tuesday's editions, th names of Joseph T. Dawson and Robert Slaughter, two D-Day veterans talking with President Clinton in France, were transposed.* The Sun regrets the error.UTAH BEACH, Normandy -- Taps was sounded yesterday for the men who died by the thousands to take the beaches of Normandy and liberate Europe from Nazi tyranny half a century ago.And a U.S. president who hadn't been born then came to pay them homage.President Clinton, who was born two years after D-Day, was joined here by French President Francois Mitterrand, who is 77 and fought in the French Army and the Resistance in World War II. Queen Elizabeth II of England came to the ceremonies, too. She was a young princess when the Allies invaded Normandy on June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Emma J. Hawkins, a member of the French Resistance and French army during World War II who later became a Howard County schoolteacher, died Aug. 1 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lookabout Manor, a Westminster assisted-living facility. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 92. Emma Josephine Guillot was born and raised in Grenoble, France. "Her father was an engineer and math professor who believed in education. She graduated from colleges and universities in France and Spain as well as an art school," said her son, Paul B. Hawkins of Finksburg, a retired Baltimore police officer.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
LUCIE AUBRAC, 94 French Resistance leader Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a hit film, died Wednesday in Paris. Born on June 29, 1912, in the eastern city of Macon, Ms. Aubrac was a history and geography teacher when she and her husband, engineer Raymond Samuel, helped create Liberation-Sud, or Liberation-South. Liberation-South was one of the first networks set up by the Resistance, a French movement to continue warfare against Germany after France's 1940 defeat in World War II. The couple adopted the nom de guerre Aubrac in the Resistance.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
For a film about passion and freedom and the unwillingness to sacrifice either, "Lucie Aubrac" sure is quiet.Based on the writings of real-life freedom fighter Lucie Aubrac, the film follows French Resistance members Raymond Samuel and his wife, Lucie Bernard (their pseudonyms were Raymond and Lucie Aubrac), as they fight against the German occupation, are separated, then struggle to re-unite. It's a grand and touching story that wrestles with one of the most controversial issues of modern French history -- could citizens be forgiven for trying to work with the Nazi occupation -- while also showcasing how brave (and resourceful)
NEWS
January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and William Thompson and Carl Schoettler and William Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondents | June 7, 1994
In an photo caption on Page 1A in Tuesday's editions, th names of Joseph T. Dawson and Robert Slaughter, two D-Day veterans talking with President Clinton in France, were transposed.* The Sun regrets the error.UTAH BEACH, Normandy -- Taps was sounded yesterday for the men who died by the thousands to take the beaches of Normandy and liberate Europe from Nazi tyranny half a century ago.And a U.S. president who hadn't been born then came to pay them homage.President Clinton, who was born two years after D-Day, was joined here by French President Francois Mitterrand, who is 77 and fought in the French Army and the Resistance in World War II. Queen Elizabeth II of England came to the ceremonies, too. She was a young princess when the Allies invaded Normandy on June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1994
Doe-eyed and fond of dances and movies, 20-year-old Simone Deutsch heard the whispers that the tumult on the far-off Normandy coast might be the Allied landing everyone in France had anticipated for months.At first, Simone was not ready to believe it. Four years of Nazi occupation had hardened her carefree spirit. She could not be certain the landing was real. Nor could she know that it was also to bring her an American husband, John "Sam" Allsup, a lieutenant in the 29th Infantry Division who was slogging his way across the beach at Normandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 11, 1994
It doesn't take a genius to see that in the crazy world of World War II, the problems of three little people don't amount to a hill of beans, which is the difficulty with "The Accompanist." The movie, which opens today at the Senator, is a hill of beans.A plush French melodrama from Claude Miller, it's about people who live in expensive apartments and have refined tastes and are quite irritated by the hubbub the war is causing outside the window. I mean, how could it? How dare it? It's bad enough the Germans have absolutely no fashion sense, but it's become really hard to get brandy from the provinces.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 2, 2012
Historians note the American alliance with King Louis XVI sustained the American cause during the darkest days of the Revolution. The history is impossible to escape. But for the deal struck in February 1778, General Washington and his Continental Army would likely not have survived. Nevertheless, and despite a successful alliance in two world wars, taking the French to task has become a popular American sport. French resistance to U.S. foreign policy moves is one reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 11, 1994
It doesn't take a genius to see that in the crazy world of World War II, the problems of three little people don't amount to a hill of beans, which is the difficulty with "The Accompanist." The movie, which opens today at the Senator, is a hill of beans.A plush French melodrama from Claude Miller, it's about people who live in expensive apartments and have refined tastes and are quite irritated by the hubbub the war is causing outside the window. I mean, how could it? How dare it? It's bad enough the Germans have absolutely no fashion sense, but it's become really hard to get brandy from the provinces.
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