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By Susan Kaye Laura Barnhardt of The Sun staff contributed to this story | October 16, 1994
Tahiti is seven hours' flying time southwest of Los Angeles, across the equator and then some. Add in nearly six hours for the transcontinental hop from Baltimore and that's a long way to travel for a beach vacation.Even so, visits to French Polynesia's islands by Maryland residents were up 54 percent in 1993 from the year before, with a total of 602 Marylanders visiting last year."One Tahiti booking was from a woman whose requirements were to go far away and get away from it all," said Donna Davis, assistant manager at Cruises Only Inc., a Baltimore travel agency.
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October 23, 2009
Where the Wild Things Are ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) $32.6 Million $32.6 million 1 week Rated : PG Running time : 1:34 What it's about : An out-of-control boy runs away from home and into a world where monsters (including Carol, above) accept him as a king. Our take : The movie single-mindedly attacks the woe-is-me part of the childhood psyche; even the wild things, wonderful to look at, are irritating to listen to -they're like Muppet versions of the characters on "In Treatment." Law Abiding Citizen * ( 1 STAR)
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FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy | September 1, 1991
With its palm-fringed, azure lagoon and miles of dazzling white sand beaches, the tiny tropical island of Manihi is considered one of the loveliest in French Polynesia.But exotic good looks aren't its only claim to fame. With a population of 50,000 -- marine oysters, that is -- this water-bound paradise is a major player in the cultivation of yet another priceless South Sea resource, the luminous black pearl. Add to these assets a world-class hotel, the Kaina Village, and it's easy to see why Manihi's popularity as an international resort destination is on the rise.
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
BORA-BORA, FRENCH POLYNESIA // A dream landscape emerged as our dinghy sped through turquoise waters toward the uninhabited South Seas islet of Tapu. Here, on a triangular speck of sand and coconut palms at the bottom of the world, red hibiscus, white gardenia and yellow plumeria blossoms were strewn on the water at land's edge. As we stepped from the boat, a sommelier offered flutes bubbling with Dom Perignon. Behind him, china and crystal sparkled on a dining table positioned in shallow water at the edge of the lagoon.
FEATURES
October 23, 2009
Where the Wild Things Are ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) $32.6 Million $32.6 million 1 week Rated : PG Running time : 1:34 What it's about : An out-of-control boy runs away from home and into a world where monsters (including Carol, above) accept him as a king. Our take : The movie single-mindedly attacks the woe-is-me part of the childhood psyche; even the wild things, wonderful to look at, are irritating to listen to -they're like Muppet versions of the characters on "In Treatment." Law Abiding Citizen * ( 1 STAR)
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
BORA-BORA, FRENCH POLYNESIA // A dream landscape emerged as our dinghy sped through turquoise waters toward the uninhabited South Seas islet of Tapu. Here, on a triangular speck of sand and coconut palms at the bottom of the world, red hibiscus, white gardenia and yellow plumeria blossoms were strewn on the water at land's edge. As we stepped from the boat, a sommelier offered flutes bubbling with Dom Perignon. Behind him, china and crystal sparkled on a dining table positioned in shallow water at the edge of the lagoon.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2006
Summer's fading faster than the tan you got last weekend in Ocean City. Along with it, the travel season is winding down to fall cruises and leaf-peeping bargains. But we don't want to let go of the summer of '06 that quickly. We want to remember the glorious beauty of French Polynesia, the castles of Prague, the smell of the sea in Maine. We want to forget the long lines, the tossed toiletries, the credit card bill and that night in Vegas. Luckily we have a few treasured souvenirs of our vacations.
TRAVEL
December 30, 2001
Once again, it's time to show off our readers' best photographs from the past year. Contributors to the Personal Journeys page of The Sun's Travel Section set out in all directions in 2001, and they came back with plenty of great pictures. Readers submitted photos from as close by as the Eastern Shore and the Outer Banks and from as far away as Zambia and French Polynesia. Some of the images on this page and inside the section are thoughtful, some are playful and some are simply beautiful.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1995
BANGKOK, Thailand -- With France only weeks from resuming nuclear testing, Japan is threatening an economic boycott that could harm the French economy.The Japanese government has bitterly criticized the decision by President Jacques Chirac to resume nuclear testing in French Polynesia this fall after a three-year moratorium. Mr. Chirac says his decision is irrevocable.The week before last, 47 Japanese lawmakers, many of them prominent members of parties in the coalition government, called for a boycott of French luxury goods, a threat that carries weight, given the affection of millions of Japanese consumers for brand-name French fashion, perfumes and liquor.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
Linda Ann Tuur Willin and James Robert Fullerton, Jr. were united in marriage on May 7, 2005 at Lovely Lane U.M. Church in Baltimore. A reception followed at The Castle at Maryvale in Brooklandville. The bride is the daughter of Mary Ann and Peter Saar, of Baltimore, MD, and John and Gail Willin, of Towson, MD. The groom is the son of James Fullerton, Sr., of Gaithersburg, MD and Lucia Fullerton, of Riva, MD. Attending the bride as Matron of Honor was Carolyn Flores, college friend of the bride.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2006
Summer's fading faster than the tan you got last weekend in Ocean City. Along with it, the travel season is winding down to fall cruises and leaf-peeping bargains. But we don't want to let go of the summer of '06 that quickly. We want to remember the glorious beauty of French Polynesia, the castles of Prague, the smell of the sea in Maine. We want to forget the long lines, the tossed toiletries, the credit card bill and that night in Vegas. Luckily we have a few treasured souvenirs of our vacations.
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye Laura Barnhardt of The Sun staff contributed to this story | October 16, 1994
Tahiti is seven hours' flying time southwest of Los Angeles, across the equator and then some. Add in nearly six hours for the transcontinental hop from Baltimore and that's a long way to travel for a beach vacation.Even so, visits to French Polynesia's islands by Maryland residents were up 54 percent in 1993 from the year before, with a total of 602 Marylanders visiting last year."One Tahiti booking was from a woman whose requirements were to go far away and get away from it all," said Donna Davis, assistant manager at Cruises Only Inc., a Baltimore travel agency.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy | September 1, 1991
With its palm-fringed, azure lagoon and miles of dazzling white sand beaches, the tiny tropical island of Manihi is considered one of the loveliest in French Polynesia.But exotic good looks aren't its only claim to fame. With a population of 50,000 -- marine oysters, that is -- this water-bound paradise is a major player in the cultivation of yet another priceless South Sea resource, the luminous black pearl. Add to these assets a world-class hotel, the Kaina Village, and it's easy to see why Manihi's popularity as an international resort destination is on the rise.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
The Moby Dick, the only ship in operation that is owned by Greenpeace -- the international environmental group -- is spending the holidays docked in Fells Point while its crew awaits instructions on its next mission.The ship, a converted 83-foot side trawler built in the Netherlands in 1959, arrived in Baltimore on Dec. 3 from New Bedford, Mass. It is working its way south after spending the summer and fall on a tour of the Great Lakes to warn of the harmful effects of toxic and radioactive pollution on humans and wildlife.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
Paul-Emile Victor, 87, the explorer considered the father of French polar expeditions, died of heart failure Tuesday on Motu-Tane, his private island and home since 1977 near Bora-Bora in French Polynesia. He made his reputation in the snow-blown climes of Greenland in the 1930s. Later, he explored Antarctica, where he became the guarantor of France's presence. During World War II, he worked with the U.S. Air Force as a paratrooper, perfecting a technique for saving troops on the "northern route" that assured the air bridge with the Soviet Union north of Alaska.
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