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By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Few people can recognize the yearning to escape better than Carla Hayden, chief executive officer of the Enoch Pratt Library. As a librarian, she has spent many years helping her curious clientele explore new realms and journey to wondrous places through books. So when Hayden decides that it's time to turn the page or open a new chapter in her life, it is no wonder she favors a destination famed like no other for its joie de vivre - Paris. We caught up with her to chat about her Parisian adventures and her favorite hidden treasures.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Few people can recognize the yearning to escape better than Carla Hayden, chief executive officer of the Enoch Pratt Library. As a librarian, she has spent many years helping her curious clientele explore new realms and journey to wondrous places through books. So when Hayden decides that it's time to turn the page or open a new chapter in her life, it is no wonder she favors a destination famed like no other for its joie de vivre - Paris. We caught up with her to chat about her Parisian adventures and her favorite hidden treasures.
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NEWS
December 6, 1995
PARIS HAS COME TO A HALT and France to paralysis in a brutal confrontation between the 1990s and the 1960s, the new right and old left, the future and the past. In the interest of European monetary union, a strong French economy and a healthy Europe, President Jacques Chirac should prevail in this struggle. He may not.The French people, having elected Mr. Chirac in May, don't much like him. He campaigned promising lower taxes and more jobs only to see the priority, once in office, for higher taxes, reduced health benefits and cutbacks of cushy perquisites for public sector workers.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | October 24, 2011
Being a geopolitical analyst and forecaster often means having to explain to people in America how and why a single event in Africa, Russia or China will directly impact them. One such event is the French presidential election set for May 2012, for which the opposition Socialists have just selected their candidate, Francois Hollande, in a final round of open primary voting. For most people, the knee-jerk reaction to an event on the other side of the world is, "Why should I give a toss what happens in France?
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1991
WARNING: YOU ARE NOW ENTERING A BASEBALL-FREE ZONE. THIS COLUMN DOES NOT PROVIDE ANY NOSTALGIA, INFORMATION OR OBSERVATIONS ON THE OLD STADIUM, THE NEW STADIUM, OR ANY POSSIBLE FUTURE STADIUMS. SORRY, I WAS JUST TOO EMOTIONALLY DRAINED.*Enemies are a necessary thing. They give us goals and direction. They give us someone to whom we can feel superior. They motivate us to strive harder.Having just lost the Soviet Union as an enemy, we are lucky, therefore, that another country has come along to fill the void:France.
NEWS
July 29, 1995
The trouble plaguing the investigation into the terrorist bombing of a commuter train under the River Seine in Paris on Tuesday is that there are too many suspects.France in recent decades has witnessed terrorism against Armenians, Jews, Iranian dissidents, Turkish dissidents, Syrian dissidents, leading French industrialists and France itself. Suspects have included Hezbollah, several governments, French anarchists. The most recent terrorism has been by Algerian extremists, some of it against each other.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | May 9, 2007
C'etait genial! When applied to the French presidential election in which conservative Nicolas Sarkozy beat Socialist candidate Segolene Royal by a comfortable margin, it means: That is fantastic! After decades of socialist influence in France, could the French election be a precursor to a Margaret Thatcher-like comeback for conservatives? Perhaps. Though, on foreign policy, Mr. Sarkozy is more pro-American than his predecessor, Jacques Chirac, he is still opposed to the Iraq war and doesn't want to seem too pro-American because most of the French remain firmly anti-American.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 17, 1992
Washington. -- The people, worms that they are, are capable of any depravity, particularly with ballots. So Europe's governing class has not consulted the people unduly about plans for ever-closer European union. Or is it to be federalism? Whatever, the people will be told their destination, in due time.But on Sunday the French people may commit what advanced thinkers everywhere consider the ultimate impudence. They may vote against the Maastricht Treaty, thereby producing a prudent pause in a process hitherto virtually untinged with democracy.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | March 10, 1997
PARIS -- At a time when the multicultural model for society has made great progress in the United States and Britain, and is firmly established in Canada, the French are determined to stick with their policy of cultural assimilation.This is a crucial choice, since tension in France over immigration is fundamentally cultural and social in origin, rather than racial. Even National Front voters object mainly that these people are ''different'' in the way they live. They say they have created an alien society of their own inside France.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | October 24, 2011
Being a geopolitical analyst and forecaster often means having to explain to people in America how and why a single event in Africa, Russia or China will directly impact them. One such event is the French presidential election set for May 2012, for which the opposition Socialists have just selected their candidate, Francois Hollande, in a final round of open primary voting. For most people, the knee-jerk reaction to an event on the other side of the world is, "Why should I give a toss what happens in France?
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | May 9, 2007
C'etait genial! When applied to the French presidential election in which conservative Nicolas Sarkozy beat Socialist candidate Segolene Royal by a comfortable margin, it means: That is fantastic! After decades of socialist influence in France, could the French election be a precursor to a Margaret Thatcher-like comeback for conservatives? Perhaps. Though, on foreign policy, Mr. Sarkozy is more pro-American than his predecessor, Jacques Chirac, he is still opposed to the Iraq war and doesn't want to seem too pro-American because most of the French remain firmly anti-American.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
COBA, Mexico -- "I'm sorry," said the manager, though clearly he wasn't. "You are not on the list."These may or may not have been his exact words. Possibly it's the residual anger that distorts my recollection of the incident, even of his name. Was it Michel? That would have been more appropriate for a French hotel. But Mitchell sticks in my mind, so that's what I'll call him.He had the look of one of those Europeans who don't do well in the tropics, who are given to lethargy and who knows what unwholesome practices, a Malcolm Lowry character right out of "Under the Volcano."
NEWS
By William Pfaff | March 10, 1997
PARIS -- At a time when the multicultural model for society has made great progress in the United States and Britain, and is firmly established in Canada, the French are determined to stick with their policy of cultural assimilation.This is a crucial choice, since tension in France over immigration is fundamentally cultural and social in origin, rather than racial. Even National Front voters object mainly that these people are ''different'' in the way they live. They say they have created an alien society of their own inside France.
NEWS
December 6, 1995
PARIS HAS COME TO A HALT and France to paralysis in a brutal confrontation between the 1990s and the 1960s, the new right and old left, the future and the past. In the interest of European monetary union, a strong French economy and a healthy Europe, President Jacques Chirac should prevail in this struggle. He may not.The French people, having elected Mr. Chirac in May, don't much like him. He campaigned promising lower taxes and more jobs only to see the priority, once in office, for higher taxes, reduced health benefits and cutbacks of cushy perquisites for public sector workers.
NEWS
July 29, 1995
The trouble plaguing the investigation into the terrorist bombing of a commuter train under the River Seine in Paris on Tuesday is that there are too many suspects.France in recent decades has witnessed terrorism against Armenians, Jews, Iranian dissidents, Turkish dissidents, Syrian dissidents, leading French industrialists and France itself. Suspects have included Hezbollah, several governments, French anarchists. The most recent terrorism has been by Algerian extremists, some of it against each other.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | September 17, 1992
Washington. -- The people, worms that they are, are capable of any depravity, particularly with ballots. So Europe's governing class has not consulted the people unduly about plans for ever-closer European union. Or is it to be federalism? Whatever, the people will be told their destination, in due time.But on Sunday the French people may commit what advanced thinkers everywhere consider the ultimate impudence. They may vote against the Maastricht Treaty, thereby producing a prudent pause in a process hitherto virtually untinged with democracy.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
COBA, Mexico -- "I'm sorry," said the manager, though clearly he wasn't. "You are not on the list."These may or may not have been his exact words. Possibly it's the residual anger that distorts my recollection of the incident, even of his name. Was it Michel? That would have been more appropriate for a French hotel. But Mitchell sticks in my mind, so that's what I'll call him.He had the look of one of those Europeans who don't do well in the tropics, who are given to lethargy and who knows what unwholesome practices, a Malcolm Lowry character right out of "Under the Volcano."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2004
PARIS - Governments come and governments go, and yesterday the French government went and came back again. Two days after his Conservative Party was soundly defeated by the leftist opposition in regional elections, President Jacques Chirac accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin and fired his government. Then he turned around and asked Raffarin to stay on and form a new administration. The news came with no explanation in a two-sentence statement from the Elysee Palace: "Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin handed the government's resignation to the president of the republic, who accepted it. He named Jean-Pierre Raffarin prime minister and ordered him to form a new government."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1991
WARNING: YOU ARE NOW ENTERING A BASEBALL-FREE ZONE. THIS COLUMN DOES NOT PROVIDE ANY NOSTALGIA, INFORMATION OR OBSERVATIONS ON THE OLD STADIUM, THE NEW STADIUM, OR ANY POSSIBLE FUTURE STADIUMS. SORRY, I WAS JUST TOO EMOTIONALLY DRAINED.*Enemies are a necessary thing. They give us goals and direction. They give us someone to whom we can feel superior. They motivate us to strive harder.Having just lost the Soviet Union as an enemy, we are lucky, therefore, that another country has come along to fill the void:France.
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