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By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | January 16, 1993
Gabriel's French Provincial InnGabriel's French Provincial Inn, Ijamsville Road, Ijamsville, (301) 865-5500. You go to Gabriel's for the experience, not for the food, which is OK at best. The experience is a seven-course French meal served in the dining rooms of a strange old farmhouse. That includes hors d'oeuvres, soup, a main course, a vegetable course, salad, cheese and dessert. Stay away from the haute-haute cuisine -- salmon and crab in puff pastry was dreadful -- and opt for simpler fare: stuffed veal breast, perhaps, or coq au vin. What more can you say when the highlight of your seven-course meal was the green salad and cheese?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
T here are a lot of technologically proficient people in Janet's World: people who can remotely trouble-shoot computer, router and Wi-Fi issues. People who don't have an anachronistic cow at the sight of the Macintosh Spinning Wheel of Panic or the PC Perpetually Turning Hourglass. People who can upload and download in their sleep, effortlessly turning jpegs into pdfs the way preschoolers turn sitting into somersaulting. I state this so that you know the competition was stiff for this year's Janet's World Technology Wizard Award.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, For The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Shanti Lewis, RD, CNSD, weighs in on ethnic food. Are you craving food with an international flair? Charles Street in downtown Baltimore offers a huge variety of ethnic restaurants. Dining out on exotic flavors from all over the world does not have to increase your waistline.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, For The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Shanti Lewis, RD, CNSD, weighs in on ethnic food. Are you craving food with an international flair? Charles Street in downtown Baltimore offers a huge variety of ethnic restaurants. Dining out on exotic flavors from all over the world does not have to increase your waistline.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 4, 1993
Maison Marconi, 106 W. Saratoga St. Open for lunch and dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays. MC, V. No-smoking area: no. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: first courses, $1.50-$8; entrees, $5.50-$18.50.As a sort of antidote to all the new upscale chain restaurants I've been to lately, I paid a visit to Baltimore's venerable Maison Marconi. Not that I've had my fill of charred rare tuna and marinated portabello mushrooms, but it was good to step back 15 years, which is about the last time I ate at Marconi's.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 3, 1995
Cafe Bretton, 849 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., Severna Park. (410) 647-8222. Open for dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays. MC, V. Prices: appetizers, $4.95-$8.95; entrees, $9.95-$22.95. ** 1/2The first thing you notice when you drive into Cafe Bretton's parking lot is the magnificent vegetable garden in back. Now this is unexpected. On the Eastern Shore, maybe -- but here, only a couple of miles from the traffic and strip malls of Route 2? It's a food lover's dream: a French restaurant that grows its own vegetables and herbs, and then serves them up fresher than fresh.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
Cafe de Paris, a French bistro formerly in Laurel, has found a new home in Columbia, where owner Erik Rochard wants to do more than offer excellent food. He wants to change the public's perception of French cuisine. "I think that the French restaurants in all the big cities in the United Sates are a bit over-priced, high-end and fancy," he said. "I wanted to show that a bistro concept - a place where you can come in casually and find good food at a reasonable price in a nice atmosphere - has a place in an average-sized city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,The Evening SunThe Sun The Sunday Sun | January 12, 1991
Ristorante Tacchetti, 1012 Eastern Ave., 727-2437. This eastern-most outpost of Little Italy is more like a cafe than a pasta palace. One long room with a bar at the front, Tacchetti's is pretty much a case of what you see when you walk in is what you get. The atmosphere is cozy, the service friendly and the food nicely done. The Swordfish Veneziana ($16) was beautifully prepared and unusual in that the swordfish was sliced more thinly than usual. $$ 1/2 moderately expensive. (Last visited 10/90.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
T here are a lot of technologically proficient people in Janet's World: people who can remotely trouble-shoot computer, router and Wi-Fi issues. People who don't have an anachronistic cow at the sight of the Macintosh Spinning Wheel of Panic or the PC Perpetually Turning Hourglass. People who can upload and download in their sleep, effortlessly turning jpegs into pdfs the way preschoolers turn sitting into somersaulting. I state this so that you know the competition was stiff for this year's Janet's World Technology Wizard Award.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
Cafe de Paris, a French bistro formerly in Laurel, has found a new home in Columbia, where owner Erik Rochard wants to do more than offer excellent food. He wants to change the public's perception of French cuisine. "I think that the French restaurants in all the big cities in the United Sates are a bit over-priced, high-end and fancy," he said. "I wanted to show that a bistro concept - a place where you can come in casually and find good food at a reasonable price in a nice atmosphere - has a place in an average-sized city.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 3, 1995
Cafe Bretton, 849 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., Severna Park. (410) 647-8222. Open for dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays. MC, V. Prices: appetizers, $4.95-$8.95; entrees, $9.95-$22.95. ** 1/2The first thing you notice when you drive into Cafe Bretton's parking lot is the magnificent vegetable garden in back. Now this is unexpected. On the Eastern Shore, maybe -- but here, only a couple of miles from the traffic and strip malls of Route 2? It's a food lover's dream: a French restaurant that grows its own vegetables and herbs, and then serves them up fresher than fresh.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 4, 1993
Maison Marconi, 106 W. Saratoga St. Open for lunch and dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays. MC, V. No-smoking area: no. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: first courses, $1.50-$8; entrees, $5.50-$18.50.As a sort of antidote to all the new upscale chain restaurants I've been to lately, I paid a visit to Baltimore's venerable Maison Marconi. Not that I've had my fill of charred rare tuna and marinated portabello mushrooms, but it was good to step back 15 years, which is about the last time I ate at Marconi's.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | January 16, 1993
Gabriel's French Provincial InnGabriel's French Provincial Inn, Ijamsville Road, Ijamsville, (301) 865-5500. You go to Gabriel's for the experience, not for the food, which is OK at best. The experience is a seven-course French meal served in the dining rooms of a strange old farmhouse. That includes hors d'oeuvres, soup, a main course, a vegetable course, salad, cheese and dessert. Stay away from the haute-haute cuisine -- salmon and crab in puff pastry was dreadful -- and opt for simpler fare: stuffed veal breast, perhaps, or coq au vin. What more can you say when the highlight of your seven-course meal was the green salad and cheese?
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