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By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2000
The verdict is in. Yuri Temirkanov whacked it out of the park last Thursday -- and out of the county last night. Out-of-town critics, this one included, agreed wholeheartedly with the Baltimoreans who gave the Russian conductor a 12-minute standing ovation at the end of his inaugural concert as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Mahler's "Resurrection" Symphony brought out the best in leader and players alike. Still, one concert does not a honeymoon make, and Temirkanov had something to prove.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
If you missed Thursday night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert at Meyerhoff Hall -- and, based on a glance around the room, a whole heckuva lot of you missed it -- there's another chance Friday (Strathmore gets the program Saturday). It's time well spent, I'd say. Carlos Kalmar, music director of the Oregon Symphony, is back for another podium visit and, as usual, leads the BSO with a calm authority that yields a fully committed response. In the big-ticket item on the bill, a 10-movement suite from Prokofiev's brilliant and riveting ballet "Romeo and Juliet," Kalmar did not burrow as deeply as some into the score's emotional turbulence.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 2001
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra spent most of Wednesday evening luxuriating in the polychromatic realm of 20th-century French music. It was a substantive and rewarding venture. For this concert at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, conductor Anne Harrigan came up with a mix of serious, sensual and lighthearted repertoire that had in common a certain subtlety of expression. True, Darius Milhaud's "La boeuf sur le toit" is not without blatant effects - a rollicking Brazilian tune that keeps coming back for one more whirl round the dance floor, all sorts of piquant dissonances - but there's still something refined about it. Harrigan had the ensemble bouncing through the piece with a good deal of character, if not always tight coordination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Just for the record, however belated, my musical adventures last Sunday started out at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion to hear the latest Baltimore Concert Opera presentation. It was enough to restore my faith in the spunky company. Too many past performances contained what sounded more like sight-reading than thorough immersion in the score and identification with the characters. Not so this time. For Verdi's "Macbeth," the company assembled a cast that was impressively prepared and, for the most part, vocally equipped for the challenge.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
When it comes to food, the culinary traditions of France and Italy are easy to distinguish: The refined elegance of classic French cuisine stands in sharp contrast to the bolder flavors of the Italian table. So, too, it is in music, particularly during the baroque era, where the contrast in culture and temperament is as different as butter and olive oil. This war of taste between French and Italian musical styles, raging heatedly in the mid-18th century during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, will be brought to life by early music ensemble Chatham Baroque at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre, Howard Community College under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 28, 2012
A chamber music group accustomed to playing the ample repertory written for piano trio gets to explore the quartet repertory when the Chagall Trio Plus One performs for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. Regardless of whether the number of players is three or four, there is a chamber music dynamic involved that's as psychological as it is musical. By definition, such small-scale ensembles literally work together at close quarters and need a harmonious decision-making process.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Just for the record, however belated, my musical adventures last Sunday started out at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion to hear the latest Baltimore Concert Opera presentation. It was enough to restore my faith in the spunky company. Too many past performances contained what sounded more like sight-reading than thorough immersion in the score and identification with the characters. Not so this time. For Verdi's "Macbeth," the company assembled a cast that was impressively prepared and, for the most part, vocally equipped for the challenge.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1996
Twentieth-century music doesn't mean only concert music anymore.And nowhere is that clearer than the itinerary of the American Musicological Society, which opens its annual meeting here today. Scholarly papers scheduled to be presented this week include such rather staid-sounding titles as "C.P.E. Bach's Paragraph on Modulation: A Defense of Improvisational Style" practically cheek-by-jowl with "Hendrix and Dylan: Two Versions of All Along the Watchtower"; "Jewish Influence on Early Christian Chant: A New Model" competes for attention with "Hip-Hop and the Commodification of Black Poverty."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
If you missed Thursday night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert at Meyerhoff Hall -- and, based on a glance around the room, a whole heckuva lot of you missed it -- there's another chance Friday (Strathmore gets the program Saturday). It's time well spent, I'd say. Carlos Kalmar, music director of the Oregon Symphony, is back for another podium visit and, as usual, leads the BSO with a calm authority that yields a fully committed response. In the big-ticket item on the bill, a 10-movement suite from Prokofiev's brilliant and riveting ballet "Romeo and Juliet," Kalmar did not burrow as deeply as some into the score's emotional turbulence.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 2007
The music season heated up some more over the weekend, with the help of interesting, effectively delivered repertoire. After an early-September, nonsubscription event featuring Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, the Shriver Hall Concert Series opened its annual classical series Sunday evening at the Johns Hopkins University with the superb Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. The program provided an immersion course in French music for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 28, 2012
A chamber music group accustomed to playing the ample repertory written for piano trio gets to explore the quartet repertory when the Chagall Trio Plus One performs for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. Regardless of whether the number of players is three or four, there is a chamber music dynamic involved that's as psychological as it is musical. By definition, such small-scale ensembles literally work together at close quarters and need a harmonious decision-making process.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 2007
The music season heated up some more over the weekend, with the help of interesting, effectively delivered repertoire. After an early-September, nonsubscription event featuring Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, the Shriver Hall Concert Series opened its annual classical series Sunday evening at the Johns Hopkins University with the superb Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. The program provided an immersion course in French music for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
When it comes to food, the culinary traditions of France and Italy are easy to distinguish: The refined elegance of classic French cuisine stands in sharp contrast to the bolder flavors of the Italian table. So, too, it is in music, particularly during the baroque era, where the contrast in culture and temperament is as different as butter and olive oil. This war of taste between French and Italian musical styles, raging heatedly in the mid-18th century during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV, will be brought to life by early music ensemble Chatham Baroque at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Smith Theatre, Howard Community College under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 2001
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra spent most of Wednesday evening luxuriating in the polychromatic realm of 20th-century French music. It was a substantive and rewarding venture. For this concert at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, conductor Anne Harrigan came up with a mix of serious, sensual and lighthearted repertoire that had in common a certain subtlety of expression. True, Darius Milhaud's "La boeuf sur le toit" is not without blatant effects - a rollicking Brazilian tune that keeps coming back for one more whirl round the dance floor, all sorts of piquant dissonances - but there's still something refined about it. Harrigan had the ensemble bouncing through the piece with a good deal of character, if not always tight coordination.
FEATURES
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2000
The verdict is in. Yuri Temirkanov whacked it out of the park last Thursday -- and out of the county last night. Out-of-town critics, this one included, agreed wholeheartedly with the Baltimoreans who gave the Russian conductor a 12-minute standing ovation at the end of his inaugural concert as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Mahler's "Resurrection" Symphony brought out the best in leader and players alike. Still, one concert does not a honeymoon make, and Temirkanov had something to prove.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1996
Twentieth-century music doesn't mean only concert music anymore.And nowhere is that clearer than the itinerary of the American Musicological Society, which opens its annual meeting here today. Scholarly papers scheduled to be presented this week include such rather staid-sounding titles as "C.P.E. Bach's Paragraph on Modulation: A Defense of Improvisational Style" practically cheek-by-jowl with "Hendrix and Dylan: Two Versions of All Along the Watchtower"; "Jewish Influence on Early Christian Chant: A New Model" competes for attention with "Hip-Hop and the Commodification of Black Poverty."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 12, 1994
Two things concerning Sergiu Comissiona about which there is no doubt: the Romanian-born conductor (along with his patron, Joseph Meyerhoff) created a fine orchestra during his 15-year tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; and, he conducts French repertory -- such as "La Mer," which is featured on his BSO program tonight -- with a subtle flexibility of rhythm and sense of color few conductors can match."
NEWS
February 9, 2007
French masterpieces -- Sundays At Three Chamber Music Series will present Masterpieces of French Chamber Music, performed by pianist Brian Ganz (above); violinists Ronald Mutchnik, Claudia Chudacoff and Peter Sirotin; violist Julius Wirth and cellist Fiona Thompson at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church, 5800 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia. Works by Cesar Frank, Maurice Ravel and Ernest Chausson are on the program. Tickets are $15; $10 for unaccompanied full-time students. Children and youth to age 18 are admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
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