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By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1995
Next week, Francois Lareuse will be a misunderstood man.The 36-year-old will find himself in a classroom surrounded by 30 eager 4- and 5-year-olds looking for direction.His answers will be in French -- all of the time.The new teacher at Crofton Woods Elementary School was hired to lead the county's first language immersion program. His directions, explanations and advice to his kindergartners will be in French. They will learn to read and write in French before they can in English."I really feel the best way to learn a language is through immersion," said Mr. Lareuse, who spent the past five years in a similar program in Prince George's County.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | October 22, 2000
When you are the mother of a teen-age boy, you take your affection wherever you can get it. So when 17-year-old Paul gave his mother a Redskins jersey for her birthday, she reacted with delight. And she wasn't faking it. To understand what this exchange meant to both of them, you have to understand that Paul's mother doesn't know whether a football is stuffed or filled with water. She commutes to Paris and Brussels and Milan in her job as a flight attendant; she visits art galleries and the theater during her layovers, and she reads French literature -- in French.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
LONDON -- These are tough times for the pride of British manhood.France's new female prime minister thinks men on this side of the Channel are not interested in women. Indeed, she has even suggested that one in four may be gay.This has touched a sensitive nerve in a country whose men endured for years the image-sapping success of one of the London stage's longest-running farces -- "No Sex, Please, We're British."If all this were not enough to make the Englishman's stiff upper lip quiver, the current British edition of Esquire magazine reports that Englishwomen regard their partners' romantic "repertoire" as "hopeless."
NEWS
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
Sigmund Freud's theory about the workings of the human mind, psychoanalysis, does not accommodate a friendly adversary. "You're either for us or against us," his champions cry. Yet, that's what I am. A friend, because I've admired the therapeutic skills of many analysts and have tried to promote what they do best; an adversary, because I believe that psychoanalysis promised more than it delivered to my discipline, psychiatry, and has encouraged a nihilistic outlook...
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
He calls himself a "Baltimoron."Yesterday, he won a Nobel Prize.Dr. Martin Rodbell, a 68-year-old graduate of City College and the Johns Hopkins University, shared the 1994 Nobel Prize in medicine with Dr. Alfred G. Gilman, 53, of the University of Texas. Working separately, the two scientists discovered and studied chemical signals called "G-proteins" that dictate the way living cells grow, change, communicate and respond to each other.Dr. Rodbell spent his career as a researcher at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | March 8, 1995
Those who served in World War II were like driftwood in the surf.The hasty creation of a massive military force precluded concern for each individual; the tides of war determined where he would be tossed next.After my duty in the Great Lakes Choir foundered, I was, successively, at quartermaster school in Newport, on a destroyer crew in California, at officer's training at Colorado College and, literally overnight, transferred to limbo in San Francisco.It is September 1943: While serving on the crew of the U.S.S.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | October 22, 2000
When you are the mother of a teen-age boy, you take your affection wherever you can get it. So when 17-year-old Paul gave his mother a Redskins jersey for her birthday, she reacted with delight. And she wasn't faking it. To understand what this exchange meant to both of them, you have to understand that Paul's mother doesn't know whether a football is stuffed or filled with water. She commutes to Paris and Brussels and Milan in her job as a flight attendant; she visits art galleries and the theater during her layovers, and she reads French literature -- in French.
NEWS
By Paul R. McHugh and Paul R. McHugh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
Sigmund Freud's theory about the workings of the human mind, psychoanalysis, does not accommodate a friendly adversary. "You're either for us or against us," his champions cry. Yet, that's what I am. A friend, because I've admired the therapeutic skills of many analysts and have tried to promote what they do best; an adversary, because I believe that psychoanalysis promised more than it delivered to my discipline, psychiatry, and has encouraged a nihilistic outlook...
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
A puzzling illness suddenly begins robbing people of their short-term memory. A single-cell marine organism is implicated. Scientists and physicians work under intense public scrutiny to find people who were poisoned and to block future outbreaks.For Dr. Trish M. Perl of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, it's not just a medical mystery. It's an uncanny echo of her past.In fall 1987, it was Perl, a young physician working for the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control in Canada, who traced TC deadly illness to blue mussels harvested in a single river on Prince Edward Island.
NEWS
November 18, 1998
Ahlam al-Tikriti, 44, the wife of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's half-brother, has died in Geneva. The cause of death was not clear, but she reportedly had been receiving treatment for breast cancer. A hospital spokeswoman confirmed the death but declined to give the cause or say when it occurred.Douglas W. Alden, 86, a scholar of French literature and a lTC descendant of Pilgrim leader John Alden, died Sunday in Charlottesville, Va. He was a specialist on novelist Marcel Proust. He also was a former president of the American Association of Teachers of French.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
A puzzling illness suddenly begins robbing people of their short-term memory. A single-cell marine organism is implicated. Scientists and physicians work under intense public scrutiny to find people who were poisoned and to block future outbreaks.For Dr. Trish M. Perl of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, it's not just a medical mystery. It's an uncanny echo of her past.In fall 1987, it was Perl, a young physician working for the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control in Canada, who traced TC deadly illness to blue mussels harvested in a single river on Prince Edward Island.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1995
Next week, Francois Lareuse will be a misunderstood man.The 36-year-old will find himself in a classroom surrounded by 30 eager 4- and 5-year-olds looking for direction.His answers will be in French -- all of the time.The new teacher at Crofton Woods Elementary School was hired to lead the county's first language immersion program. His directions, explanations and advice to his kindergartners will be in French. They will learn to read and write in French before they can in English."I really feel the best way to learn a language is through immersion," said Mr. Lareuse, who spent the past five years in a similar program in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | March 8, 1995
Those who served in World War II were like driftwood in the surf.The hasty creation of a massive military force precluded concern for each individual; the tides of war determined where he would be tossed next.After my duty in the Great Lakes Choir foundered, I was, successively, at quartermaster school in Newport, on a destroyer crew in California, at officer's training at Colorado College and, literally overnight, transferred to limbo in San Francisco.It is September 1943: While serving on the crew of the U.S.S.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
He calls himself a "Baltimoron."Yesterday, he won a Nobel Prize.Dr. Martin Rodbell, a 68-year-old graduate of City College and the Johns Hopkins University, shared the 1994 Nobel Prize in medicine with Dr. Alfred G. Gilman, 53, of the University of Texas. Working separately, the two scientists discovered and studied chemical signals called "G-proteins" that dictate the way living cells grow, change, communicate and respond to each other.Dr. Rodbell spent his career as a researcher at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
LONDON -- These are tough times for the pride of British manhood.France's new female prime minister thinks men on this side of the Channel are not interested in women. Indeed, she has even suggested that one in four may be gay.This has touched a sensitive nerve in a country whose men endured for years the image-sapping success of one of the London stage's longest-running farces -- "No Sex, Please, We're British."If all this were not enough to make the Englishman's stiff upper lip quiver, the current British edition of Esquire magazine reports that Englishwomen regard their partners' romantic "repertoire" as "hopeless."
NEWS
July 2, 2003
Monica B. Himmelheber, a homemaker and former Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. operator, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at Brighton Gardens Assisted Living in Columbia. She was 93. Born Monica B. Stricker in New Freedom, Pa., she left school after the sixth grade to help support her family. She later moved to Baltimore and worked during the late 1920s and 1930s as an operator for C&P's downtown Vernon exchange. In 1938, she married Thomas J. Himmelheber, a Standard Oil Co. salesman who died in 1964.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Patricia O'Callaghan Abell, a dedicated volunteer for many charities, died of complications from lung cancer Friday at the Hospice of Washington. She was 88. Mrs. Abell, a resident of Chevy Chase since 1946, was born in New York City and grew up in Montclair, N.J. She earned a bachelor's degree in French literature from Marymount College in Tarrytown, N.Y., and attended the Sorbonne in Paris. Her volunteer work included weekly visits to Christ Child Opportunity Shop in Georgetown. She also was active in St. Gertrude's Guild and the Christ Child Society.
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