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By Barbara A. Noe and Barbara A. Noe,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Outside the picture window, the setting sun sends long shadows over violet, lavender and indigo peaks, and stars in the darkening universe seem to echo the tiny sparkles appearing in the valley far below. Edith Piaf trills in the background, and five newly made friends and I, speaking only French, make our way through a five-course gourmet meal in typical French style -- with lots of talk and even more wine. All the French touches are there -- President-brand butter and salt for the radishes, an endless supply of baguettes, three kinds of pates and three cheeses, espresso served in demitasse cups.
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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2006
The Story of French Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow St. Martin's Press / 483 pages / $25.95 Once the world's pre-eminent language, today French ranks only ninth among the top 15 languages. Although French is spoken by about 175 million people, called francophones, and is an official language in 41 countries, most of them members of an organization called La Francophonie, it's far behind Chinese, Hindi, Spanish and English, and on a par with Portuguese. In The Story of French, Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow cover the people, places and events behind the rise and fall of the French language.
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NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2006
The Story of French Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow St. Martin's Press / 483 pages / $25.95 Once the world's pre-eminent language, today French ranks only ninth among the top 15 languages. Although French is spoken by about 175 million people, called francophones, and is an official language in 41 countries, most of them members of an organization called La Francophonie, it's far behind Chinese, Hindi, Spanish and English, and on a par with Portuguese. In The Story of French, Jean-Benoit Nadeau and Julie Barlow cover the people, places and events behind the rise and fall of the French language.
NEWS
By Leonard Boasberg | May 23, 2003
SECRETARY OF State Colin L. Powell may be in Paris and President Bush plans to go to France soon, but let's not forget the administration's consideration of punishing the French for opposing the Iraq war. Among other measures for making the French suffer the consequences was the possibility of limiting French participation in international meetings and sidelining France in NATO discussions. Pretty piddling stuff, in my view. Why be so wimpish about what Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld so diplomatically refers to as the "old Europe"?
NEWS
By TRB | November 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- This is a trick question. Three days before Quebec's sovereignty referendum, when anti-sovereigntists rallied in Montreal, how large was the turnout, as reported by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation?Answer: Depends on what you mean by ''Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.'' According to Newsworld, the CBC's English-language all-news channel, the turnout was 150,000. According to RDI, the CBC's French-language all-news channel, the turnout was 35,000.Of all the reasons to believe that sovereignty for Quebec is still in the cards, the biggest may be the force this anecdote crystallizes: the balkanizing tendency of some modern communications technologies.
NEWS
By Leonard Boasberg | May 23, 2003
SECRETARY OF State Colin L. Powell may be in Paris and President Bush plans to go to France soon, but let's not forget the administration's consideration of punishing the French for opposing the Iraq war. Among other measures for making the French suffer the consequences was the possibility of limiting French participation in international meetings and sidelining France in NATO discussions. Pretty piddling stuff, in my view. Why be so wimpish about what Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld so diplomatically refers to as the "old Europe"?
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 19, 2001
In Baltimore County Police Department to promote 11 in ceremony today TIMONIUM -- The Baltimore County Police Department will promote 11 members at ceremonies at 2 p.m. today in the Administration Building at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. The promotees, their new ranks and assignments are: Capt. Randall B. Russin, major, Support Operations Division; Lt. Gordon R. Skinner, captain, Operations Bureau; Lt. Mark J. Warren, captain, School Resources Section; Sgt. David J. Folderauer, lieutenant, Wilkens Precinct; and Sgt. Paul D. Martin Jr., lieutenant, Wilkens Precinct.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 1, 1994
There I am, nibbling my croissant and sipping my cafe au lait at the Au Bon Pain, when the terrible news flashes before my American eyes.The French are convinced that we are making a bid for the hostile takeover of their language. So they are trying to put up trade barriers against imported English words.The protectionists of Paris seem to be suffering from what is known among the young and hip in their land as le stress. They do not like the fact that cars in France are equipped with les air bags or that their monetary system is suffering le cash flow.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 18, 1994
New York. -- The French have decided to take another stand against the spread of the English language. This time, rather than just creating French equivalents of English words and phrases -- to try to stop people from saying ''le stress'' and ''le cash flow'' -- the government of Prime Minister Edouard Balladur is in the process of making it illegal to use English in official documents, on radio and television and in advertising.''Bonne chance, mes amis!'' I love and sympathize with most things French, a gift of the four years I lived in Paris.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1994
PARIS -- The French official, elegant as always, walked into the foreign ministry salon, bowed slightly and started, "Le briefing est off the record."Soon, official use of such a phrase will be against the law if the culture ministry has its way. So will Fun Radio's un-French name and its babble by "le disque-jockey" about "le hit parade."France's old and losing battle against the English language has moved into a new and touchy phase now that the government has presented a draft law to put up a barrier against further foreign incursions.
TRAVEL
By Barbara A. Noe and Barbara A. Noe,Special to the Sun | July 21, 2002
Outside the picture window, the setting sun sends long shadows over violet, lavender and indigo peaks, and stars in the darkening universe seem to echo the tiny sparkles appearing in the valley far below. Edith Piaf trills in the background, and five newly made friends and I, speaking only French, make our way through a five-course gourmet meal in typical French style -- with lots of talk and even more wine. All the French touches are there -- President-brand butter and salt for the radishes, an endless supply of baguettes, three kinds of pates and three cheeses, espresso served in demitasse cups.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
CHILDREN WERE not the only ones to say goodbye to school last week. June also means changes for teachers in many area schools. Among those retiring this year are Arundel High School teachers Jeffrey Amdur, Judith Sinkovitz and William Zucco, who have had a combined career at the school spanning more than 90 years. Amdur began teaching at Arundel 24 years ago. A graduate of Loyola College in Baltimore, he has shared his love of the Romance languages with thousands of area children. Amdur's passion has been French language and culture.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 19, 2001
In Baltimore County Police Department to promote 11 in ceremony today TIMONIUM -- The Baltimore County Police Department will promote 11 members at ceremonies at 2 p.m. today in the Administration Building at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. The promotees, their new ranks and assignments are: Capt. Randall B. Russin, major, Support Operations Division; Lt. Gordon R. Skinner, captain, Operations Bureau; Lt. Mark J. Warren, captain, School Resources Section; Sgt. David J. Folderauer, lieutenant, Wilkens Precinct; and Sgt. Paul D. Martin Jr., lieutenant, Wilkens Precinct.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1999
FRENCH TEACHER Karen Mentz swished into the first- and second-grade classrooms at Trinity School dressed in a full-length, lavender satin gown with a three-tiered skirt.She sported a matching white lace parasol, and her curly shoulder-length hair was framed by a wide-brimmed white lace hat.For the past two years, Mentz has taught French to grades five through eight at Trinity Middle School in Ellicott City.Teaching French culture is as important as teaching the language, she says.Last week, Trinity pupils learned about Mardi Gras.
NEWS
By TRB | November 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- This is a trick question. Three days before Quebec's sovereignty referendum, when anti-sovereigntists rallied in Montreal, how large was the turnout, as reported by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation?Answer: Depends on what you mean by ''Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.'' According to Newsworld, the CBC's English-language all-news channel, the turnout was 150,000. According to RDI, the CBC's French-language all-news channel, the turnout was 35,000.Of all the reasons to believe that sovereignty for Quebec is still in the cards, the biggest may be the force this anecdote crystallizes: the balkanizing tendency of some modern communications technologies.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 2, 1995
Havre de Grace -- So Quebec, by the narrowest of whiskers, will remain for the moment a part of Canada. Do we care? We should, for in the cacaphonic separatist struggle to the north are the outlines of our own unhappy future.Time was, and not so long ago either, that intellectuals in the United States saw Canada as a role model. It didn't seem to get involved in wars, and it was a big democratic welfare state in which a majority of the population, invoking fairness and diversity and other warm but vague concepts, bent over backward to make its largest minority happy.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
CHILDREN WERE not the only ones to say goodbye to school last week. June also means changes for teachers in many area schools. Among those retiring this year are Arundel High School teachers Jeffrey Amdur, Judith Sinkovitz and William Zucco, who have had a combined career at the school spanning more than 90 years. Amdur began teaching at Arundel 24 years ago. A graduate of Loyola College in Baltimore, he has shared his love of the Romance languages with thousands of area children. Amdur's passion has been French language and culture.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 2, 1995
Havre de Grace -- So Quebec, by the narrowest of whiskers, will remain for the moment a part of Canada. Do we care? We should, for in the cacaphonic separatist struggle to the north are the outlines of our own unhappy future.Time was, and not so long ago either, that intellectuals in the United States saw Canada as a role model. It didn't seem to get involved in wars, and it was a big democratic welfare state in which a majority of the population, invoking fairness and diversity and other warm but vague concepts, bent over backward to make its largest minority happy.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 1, 1994
There I am, nibbling my croissant and sipping my cafe au lait at the Au Bon Pain, when the terrible news flashes before my American eyes.The French are convinced that we are making a bid for the hostile takeover of their language. So they are trying to put up trade barriers against imported English words.The protectionists of Paris seem to be suffering from what is known among the young and hip in their land as le stress. They do not like the fact that cars in France are equipped with les air bags or that their monetary system is suffering le cash flow.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 18, 1994
New York. -- The French have decided to take another stand against the spread of the English language. This time, rather than just creating French equivalents of English words and phrases -- to try to stop people from saying ''le stress'' and ''le cash flow'' -- the government of Prime Minister Edouard Balladur is in the process of making it illegal to use English in official documents, on radio and television and in advertising.''Bonne chance, mes amis!'' I love and sympathize with most things French, a gift of the four years I lived in Paris.
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