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French Immersion

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NEWS
By Christina Asquith and Christina Asquith,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
Parlez-vous Francaise?Thirty kindergartners will answer "oui" this September, when they start a new program at Crofton Woods Elementary School that will teach them French by immersing them in the language.From asking for a drink of water to chatting among themselves, only French will be allowed. Textbooks also will be in French. Though the program lasts until fifth grade, students will have a class on the English language and grammar in second grade.The voluntary program received final approval yesterday after parents raised the required $20,000 to match the county's $50,000.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
Using red chips, the 22 children in Emilie Seck's kindergarten class are learning the concept of more and less. Only instead of more and less, they're using the words plus and moins. Seck is conducting the lesson in French. These pupils at Wellwood International Elementary School in Pikesville - native English speakers except for one boy who speaks Japanese - are enrolled in the school's language immersion program, receiving half their daily instruction in French. The program, one of a handful in Maryland, is persevering despite the intense pressure schools face under the No Child Left Behind Act to produce high scores on tests in English.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
The $63,277 earmarked for the French immersion program at Crofton Woods Elementary School is a fraction of a percentage point in the superintendent's recommended $427.5 million budget, but it is triggering a firestorm over fairness in Anne Arundel County schools.The furor is plunging the school system in debates over whether and how the nation's 47th-largest school system should meet the needs of its diverse population of 72,000 students.Proponents see French immersion as the kind of innovative program that enhances the school system.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
School board members are again considering ending a French language program at Crofton Woods Elementary School. Yesterday, the board sat through a presentation that showed how successful the French Immersion program has been in teaching first-, second- and third-graders not only French, but their other subjects too -- all of which are taught in French. Running a program that benefits only a small number of the district's 73,000 students has long made the French classes a target of budget cutters on the board.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
The Anne Arundel County school board decided last night to start an alternative high school for disruptive teen-agers, retain a controversial French immersion pilot program and add 14 elementary school reading specialists for the coming school year.The changes were part of a $429.4 million operating budget that the board adopted last night. The proposed spending plan is nearly $2 million more than the amount proposed in January by school Superintendent Carol S. Parham.Board members agreed that they want an alternative high school for 120 students, which would take its first students next February.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | August 13, 1995
The new French immersion program at Crofton Woods Elementary has opened un vrai casse-tete.Soon, 30 kindergartners at Crofton Woods will know that means "a big can of worms" without having to reach for the trusty French/English dictionary the way most of us who studied French in college still do. These children will become fluent in French tres vite because they won't be allowed to speak anything else.Our approach to teaching foreign language in this country -- making it a high school elective -- has never made sense.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
The Anne Arundel County school board did nothing improper when it started a French language immersion pilot program last year at Crofton Woods Elementary School, a state judge has found.Administrative Law Judge Michael J. Wallace recommended in a 28-page proposed opinion that the state school board dismiss a Crofton woman's challenge to the program, now in its second year.The record of the case "fails to support" the argument of Laure Cruz, a Crofton parent who alleged that the board "failed to properly follow established parliamentary procedure" when it created the program, Wallace wrote in an opinion signed last week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
The $63,277 earmarked for the French immersion program at Crofton Woods Elementary School is a fraction of a percentage point in the superintendent's recommended $427.5 million budget, but it is triggering a firestorm over fairness in Anne Arundel County schools.The furor is plunging the school system in debates over whether and how the nation's 47th-largest school system should meet the needs of its diverse population of 72,000 students.Proponents see French immersion as the kind of innovative program that enhances the school system.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Foreign language programs -- including a French program at Crofton Woods Elementary School -- will be the focus of a county school board review this week."
NEWS
August 23, 1995
All the talk about getting back to basics in public education generally flies out the window when school board members sit down to decide how to spend taxpayers' money. All of a sudden, nobody agrees what a "basic" education should include. A computer in every classroom? A computer for every student? Serviceable but comparatively slow 486DX PCs or 100-megahertz Pentiums? Board members become like shoppers on a new-car lot; they may start out looking for good gas mileage and reliability, but pretty soon they're faced with so many neat options that what they really need becomes overshadowed by what they'd like to have.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Foreign language programs -- including a French program at Crofton Woods Elementary School -- will be the focus of a county school board review this week."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
A controversial French language program at Crofton Woods Elementary School should be moved to a magnet school and standardized tests should be given to measure progress, according to a report the Anne Arundel County School Board reviewed this week.Those were two of the six recommendations a foreign language consultant made after evaluating the French Immersion Program.The voluntary classes immerse children in French all day. Kindergarten, first- and second-graders are involved now, but the goal of the six-year pilot program is to keep hiring teachers until there is one for each grade through fifth.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
The Anne Arundel County school board did nothing improper when it started a French language immersion pilot program last year at Crofton Woods Elementary School, a state judge has found.Administrative Law Judge Michael J. Wallace recommended in a 28-page proposed opinion that the state school board dismiss a Crofton woman's challenge to the program, now in its second year.The record of the case "fails to support" the argument of Laure Cruz, a Crofton parent who alleged that the board "failed to properly follow established parliamentary procedure" when it created the program, Wallace wrote in an opinion signed last week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary vowed yesterday to eliminate the $6.4 million in pay raises the school board voted to give its workers before he sends his budget proposal to the County Council.The school board approved a $435.8 million operating budget Wednesday that included a 2 percent raise for its employees, and sent it to Mr. Gary. The spending plan is $8.3 million more than Superintendent Carol S. Parham had recommended and more than $10 million above the figure Mr. Gary had in mind.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
The Anne Arundel County school board decided last night to start an alternative high school for disruptive teen-agers, retain a controversial French immersion pilot program and add 14 elementary school reading specialists for the coming school year.The changes were part of a $429.4 million operating budget that the board adopted last night. The proposed spending plan is nearly $2 million more than the amount proposed in January by school Superintendent Carol S. Parham.Board members agreed that they want an alternative high school for 120 students, which would take its first students next February.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
The $63,277 earmarked for the French immersion program at Crofton Woods Elementary School is a fraction of a percentage point in the superintendent's recommended $427.5 million budget, but it is triggering a firestorm over fairness in Anne Arundel County schools.The furor is plunging the school system in debates over whether and how the nation's 47th-largest school system should meet the needs of its diverse population of 72,000 students.Proponents see French immersion as the kind of innovative program that enhances the school system.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
IN ANNE ARUNDEL County last spring, County Council members decided they couldn't justify an experimental French program for kindergartners when other classrooms were without adequate, up-to-date books or copy paper. Astoundingly, due to quirkly laws governing the relationship between lawmakers who control the government purse strings and a semi-autonomous Board of Education, the program -- known as French immersion -- is alive and well in Anne Arundel.No sooner had the council adopted a school spending plan, sans French immersion, than the school board moved forward with it anyway, using money lawmakers had earmarked for other educational needs.
NEWS
By SHIRLEY LEUNG and SHIRLEY LEUNG,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
School board President Joseph Foster says he wants to end the bickering among parents at Crofton Woods Elementary over the school's French immersion program. So he has asked the board to meet at the school to help the community talk through its problems."There seems to have been a great deal of controversy, a lot of questions and a general lack of understanding what the program is all about," Mr. Foster said. "This is the best way to address that."Mr. Foster, a board member for three years, said he has never seen a community so up in arms about one educational program.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
The $63,277 earmarked for the French immersion program at Crofton Woods Elementary School is a fraction of a percentage point in the superintendent's recommended $427.5 million budget, but it is triggering a firestorm over fairness in Anne Arundel County schools.The furor is plunging the school system in debates over whether and how the nation's 47th-largest school system should meet the needs of its diverse population of 72,000 students.Proponents see French immersion as the kind of innovative program that enhances the school system.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
IN ANNE ARUNDEL County last spring, County Council members decided they couldn't justify an experimental French program for kindergartners when other classrooms were without adequate, up-to-date books or copy paper. Astoundingly, due to quirkly laws governing the relationship between lawmakers who control the government purse strings and a semi-autonomous Board of Education, the program -- known as French immersion -- is alive and well in Anne Arundel.No sooner had the council adopted a school spending plan, sans French immersion, than the school board moved forward with it anyway, using money lawmakers had earmarked for other educational needs.
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