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By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 1999
OUTSTANDING YOUNG musicians from across the country auditioned in the spring for the eighth annual Disney's Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra.One was Elijah Smith of Sykesville.Elijah was one of 85 youngsters ages 8 to 13 selected for the orchestra, which was led by Lucas Richman.Richman is assistant conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony and principal conductor for the Pasadena Pops Orchestra in California.Prospective members were required to submit a written application outlining performance experience and award history.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Allyson Luo took up clarinet because the instrument was shiny and "looked nice. " David Flyr began playing the French horn because his mother said it might be a path to scholarships. At some point, both River Hill High School seniors discovered they were on to something; through those instruments, their talents shined. Now both have been recognized among some of the best school musicians in the state and nation. Luo and Flyr were among 670 students nationwide to be named to the National Association for Music Education's All-National Honor Ensemble, which will perform at the organization's conference in Nashville, Tenn., on Oct. 30. Luo and Flyr were among four Howard County band members selected for the ensemble.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | October 17, 1990
French horn players are notorious for being the naughty boys and girls of the orchestra, and why not? A horn player takes so much grief from this supremely treacherous instrument that the prospect of brooking additional nonsense from a colleague or a conductor is unthinkable.Don't let the mellow sound fool you. French horn solos are music's answer to a high wire act.Cupping the right hand inside the bell, perching the instrument precariously on the right leg or in midair if preferable, the virtuoso player must dominate a tiny mouthpiece with an outstandingly large arsenal of lip movements, while expending prodigious amounts of oxygen and engaging the inner senses of pitch and melody to coax music out of an unwieldy system of tubes, slides and valves.
NEWS
By Blair Ames, bames@tribune.com | September 30, 2013
Winters Mill High School junior Scott Taylor practices on the French horn for at least an hour a day. That dedication has paid off for Taylor, who recently was named a member of the 2013 All-National Honor Band. "Just the opportunity to play with the best musicians in the nation, that really excites me," Taylor said. Taylor, 16, will travel to Nashville in late October as part of the 2013 All-National Honor Band sponsored by the National Association for Music Education (NafME)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 2, 1992
French horn players are notorious for being the "problem children" of the orchestra. And why not? With all the guff they suffer at the hands of the unwieldy, uncooperative instrument they play, why should they brook additional nonsense from a colleague or even a world-renowned maestro?Few instruments speak with the mellow eloquence of the French horn, but structurally it is an instrument only a plumber could love: a complex ventilation system of valves, tubes, pipes, crooks and slides that somehow turns a column of air into the sublime slow movement of Tchaikovsky's "Fifth Symphony."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Walter A. Lawson, a nationally recognized French horn maker and a former Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musician, died Wednesday of heart disease at Reeders Memorial Home in Boonsboro. The former Catonsville resident was 84. Born in Binghamton, N.Y., Mr. Lawson studied piano and horn as a youngster. During World War II, he worked for the Associated Press as a teletype mechanic and served in the Army Signal Corps. He was stationed on Okinawa when the war ended. Using his veterans benefits, he moved to Baltimore in 1947 and enrolled at the Peabody Conservatory.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
By Blair Ames, bames@tribune.com | September 30, 2013
Winters Mill High School junior Scott Taylor practices on the French horn for at least an hour a day. That dedication has paid off for Taylor, who recently was named a member of the 2013 All-National Honor Band. "Just the opportunity to play with the best musicians in the nation, that really excites me," Taylor said. Taylor, 16, will travel to Nashville in late October as part of the 2013 All-National Honor Band sponsored by the National Association for Music Education (NafME)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | January 28, 1994
The area's newest father-son musical duo will make its concert debut at 7:30 this evening at the Heritage Harbor clubhouse west of Annapolis.Douglas Allanbrook, the distinguished composer, harpsichordist, pianist and St. John's tutor, will be joined by 16-year-old John Allanbrook, a Key School sophomore and the principal French horn player in the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra.Father and son will perform the Mozart third horn concerto and portions of Mr. Allanbrook's "25 Building Blocks", a series of challenging variations for horn and piano.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield ANNE ARUNDEL DIVERSIONS and Phil Greenfield ANNE ARUNDEL DIVERSIONS,Contributing Writer | October 9, 1992
Saturday's Annapolis Symphony concert, the orchestra's +V inaugural offering of the 1992-1993 season, was a pleasant affair highlighted by an excellent visiting soloist, some admirably energetic playing by the orchestra, and a large, appreciative audience.William Ver Meulen, the gifted principal French horn of the Houston Symphony, was soloist in concertos by Mozart and Richard Strauss. His performance left no doubt as to why he is acknowledged as one of America's finest horn players.Technically, there is nothing he can't do on the French horn.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Walter A. Lawson, a nationally recognized French horn maker and a former Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musician, died Wednesday of heart disease at Reeders Memorial Home in Boonsboro. The former Catonsville resident was 84. Born in Binghamton, N.Y., Mr. Lawson studied piano and horn as a youngster. During World War II, he worked for the Associated Press as a teletype mechanic and served in the Army Signal Corps. He was stationed on Okinawa when the war ended. Using his veterans benefits, he moved to Baltimore in 1947 and enrolled at the Peabody Conservatory.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
Drummer Mark St. Pierre is leading a very big and very young jazz band rehearsing Cab Calloway's "Minnie the Moocher." St. Pierre, who plays everything from blues, bebop and fusion to calypso, Afro-Cuban and reggae, is a guest teacher at the Blue Note Jazz Band Camp at Baltimore County's Oakleigh Elementary School. Plenty of summer camps offer kids musical instruction from rock to Eroica, but the Blue Note jazz camp seems to be unique in Maryland and is one of only a handful of jazz camps in the country.
NEWS
By Eileen Soskin and Eileen Soskin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Live music. Alive music. Live audiences. Come one, come all. But why should you? Why should you leave the comfort of your easy chair and venture out to a concert? Our compact-disc players and television systems provide us with sophisticated sound systems that deliver wonderful musical experiences with the flick of a finger. Yet the most intense musical experiences come about only when we are present, not virtually present. Nothing, absolutely nothing, is like live music. On a CD, the sound is so clear that you can hear the performers breathe; on television, the camera can zoom in so that you can watch the performers breathe; but when you are there, you are in control: you choose what to look at; you choose what to hear; you choose what to focus on. A concert is an intimate experience even if you are sitting in an auditorium with hundreds of other people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and By Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | June 30, 2002
I'm not the quiet one, everyone else is too loud," bassist John Entwistle sang on the Who's otherwise forgettable Face Dances album in 1981. Still, John Entwistle -- who died of a heart attack Thursday in Las Vegas -- is remembered as the quiet one of the Who, which joined with the Beatles and Rolling Stones to form the great triumvirate of British rock bands. Entwistle, 57, was found dead in his hotel room on the eve of the Who's American tour, which was set to begin Friday in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
BOONSBORO -- Deep in the woods above town, Walter Lawson and his boys help others make beautiful music.In their hands, fat rolls of sheet metal and long tubes of copper become the graceful curves and polished bells of some of the world's finest French horns.To the untrained eye and ear, Lawson horns might look ordinary. But to music's hottest lips, including several in Baltimore, a Lawson horn is worth a year's wait.Each one is crafted to exacting specifications and adjusted to the player's needs.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
Drummer Mark St. Pierre is leading a very big and very young jazz band rehearsing Cab Calloway's "Minnie the Moocher." St. Pierre, who plays everything from blues, bebop and fusion to calypso, Afro-Cuban and reggae, is a guest teacher at the Blue Note Jazz Band Camp at Baltimore County's Oakleigh Elementary School. Plenty of summer camps offer kids musical instruction from rock to Eroica, but the Blue Note jazz camp seems to be unique in Maryland and is one of only a handful of jazz camps in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and By Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | June 30, 2002
I'm not the quiet one, everyone else is too loud," bassist John Entwistle sang on the Who's otherwise forgettable Face Dances album in 1981. Still, John Entwistle -- who died of a heart attack Thursday in Las Vegas -- is remembered as the quiet one of the Who, which joined with the Beatles and Rolling Stones to form the great triumvirate of British rock bands. Entwistle, 57, was found dead in his hotel room on the eve of the Who's American tour, which was set to begin Friday in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 1999
OUTSTANDING YOUNG musicians from across the country auditioned in the spring for the eighth annual Disney's Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra.One was Elijah Smith of Sykesville.Elijah was one of 85 youngsters ages 8 to 13 selected for the orchestra, which was led by Lucas Richman.Richman is assistant conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony and principal conductor for the Pasadena Pops Orchestra in California.Prospective members were required to submit a written application outlining performance experience and award history.
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