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By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 23, 1992
Paris -- In 1972, Robert Paxton, an American historian, published a history of the wartime Petain government in France. He argued that it had been not only collaborationist but a dynamic and coherent attempt to create a new France -- conservative, corporatist and authoritarian.He said the Vichy regime produced technocratic and administrative innovations that greatly influenced postwar France. He also said that Vichy had its own racialist ideas, and that its policies toward the Jews were not simply dictated by the German occupation authorities.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
For a film about passion and freedom and the unwillingness to sacrifice either, "Lucie Aubrac" sure is quiet.Based on the writings of real-life freedom fighter Lucie Aubrac, the film follows French Resistance members Raymond Samuel and his wife, Lucie Bernard (their pseudonyms were Raymond and Lucie Aubrac), as they fight against the German occupation, are separated, then struggle to re-unite. It's a grand and touching story that wrestles with one of the most controversial issues of modern French history -- could citizens be forgiven for trying to work with the Nazi occupation -- while also showcasing how brave (and resourceful)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
For a film about passion and freedom and the unwillingness to sacrifice either, "Lucie Aubrac" sure is quiet.Based on the writings of real-life freedom fighter Lucie Aubrac, the film follows French Resistance members Raymond Samuel and his wife, Lucie Bernard (their pseudonyms were Raymond and Lucie Aubrac), as they fight against the German occupation, are separated, then struggle to re-unite. It's a grand and touching story that wrestles with one of the most controversial issues of modern French history -- could citizens be forgiven for trying to work with the Nazi occupation -- while also showcasing how brave (and resourceful)
NEWS
By Saman Zia-Zarifi | November 9, 1997
Even as the French are flagellating themselves for their sins of the past, through the painful public process of Maurice Papon's trial for crimes a-gainst humanity, one thing is clear: French oil companies have not yet learned a lesson.Papon, a lifelong civil servant whose career peaked with a stint in the Cabinet during the 1970s, is on trial for his alleged complicity during the Vichy regime with the conveyance of Jews to Nazi concentration camps - an unexplored part of French history.During the trial and the examination of Papon's personality, serious questions arose about the role of French police (Papon was the chief of police in Paris during the early 1960s)
NEWS
By Saman Zia-Zarifi | November 9, 1997
Even as the French are flagellating themselves for their sins of the past, through the painful public process of Maurice Papon's trial for crimes a-gainst humanity, one thing is clear: French oil companies have not yet learned a lesson.Papon, a lifelong civil servant whose career peaked with a stint in the Cabinet during the 1970s, is on trial for his alleged complicity during the Vichy regime with the conveyance of Jews to Nazi concentration camps - an unexplored part of French history.During the trial and the examination of Papon's personality, serious questions arose about the role of French police (Papon was the chief of police in Paris during the early 1960s)
NEWS
By EDUARDO CUE | November 15, 1992
Paris. -- Anyone who finds it difficult to understand the French position on agricultural subsidies in the current round of trade talks need only drive in any direction from the French capital for an hour or so. Whether west to Normandy and Brittany, southeast toward Burgundy, north through the Picardie or southwest to the Loire Valley and the Bordeaux wine region, the scene is pastoral and exquisite. Softly rolling hills and expanses of plains seem to alternate forever, sprinkled with the stone villages of the Middle Ages.
NEWS
By EDUARDO CUE | April 19, 1992
Paris. -- The American Dream arrived just outside Paris this week in the form of the EuroDisney amusement park, and while France welcomed Mickey Mouse and his friends with uncharacteristic enthusiasm, some here are wondering if the presence of an American enclave in the heart of Europe will not turn into a nightmare.Once proud of smirking at anything American, the French turned last Sunday's opening into a state occasion. The national press covered the inauguration as if it were one of the most important events in modern French history, and for weeks people seemed to have little else on their minds.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 1999
PARIS -- This week, the curtain will rise on a spectacle without precedent in French history: a former prime minister on trial on charges of involuntary manslaughter.It is a day for which Edmond-Luc Henry, 49, and other hemophiliacs in France who carry the AIDS virus have waited for more than a decade.Once the "Wunderkind" of the Socialist Party, Laurent Fabius, 52 -- or someone else in the government that he headed from 1984 to 1986 -- blocked the sale of an AIDS virus detection test manufactured by Abbott Laboratories, an American firm, so that a French competitor wouldn't be shut out of the market.
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Editorial from The Record | February 20, 2013
The only questions six years ago when the tradition started in Havre de Grace were why had no one thought of it before, and why did so few people show up for the first one. This year, the event drew a reasonably healthy crowd that was very well-behaved, considering the nature of the festivities, being a traditional last hurrah before the fasting season of Lent. The event, of course, is the Fat Tuesday Mardi Gras Parade that came to full blossom last week on Bourbon Street in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
July 18, 2005
Mary-Gresham Machen, who held degrees in French history and collected children's books, died from complications of pneumonia Thursday at Roland Park Place, where she had lived since 1987. She was 86. Born and raised in Ruxton, she was a 1937 graduate of the old Greenwood School. She was a graduate of Goucher College, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned a master's degree and doctorate from the Johns Hopkins University, where her doctoral thesis was on the political influence of Joan of Arc. "Her student life was often interrupted by long illnesses.
NEWS
By EDUARDO CUE | November 15, 1992
Paris. -- Anyone who finds it difficult to understand the French position on agricultural subsidies in the current round of trade talks need only drive in any direction from the French capital for an hour or so. Whether west to Normandy and Brittany, southeast toward Burgundy, north through the Picardie or southwest to the Loire Valley and the Bordeaux wine region, the scene is pastoral and exquisite. Softly rolling hills and expanses of plains seem to alternate forever, sprinkled with the stone villages of the Middle Ages.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 23, 1992
Paris -- In 1972, Robert Paxton, an American historian, published a history of the wartime Petain government in France. He argued that it had been not only collaborationist but a dynamic and coherent attempt to create a new France -- conservative, corporatist and authoritarian.He said the Vichy regime produced technocratic and administrative innovations that greatly influenced postwar France. He also said that Vichy had its own racialist ideas, and that its policies toward the Jews were not simply dictated by the German occupation authorities.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2006
James C. Pine, who was believed to be Gilman School's oldest living graduate and who taught there for more than 40 years, died Thursday at the Heron Point retirement community in Chestertown. He was 101. Mr. Pine's philosophy of hard work and discipline helped shape Gilman's reputation, according to fellow teachers. He was head of the history department and director of the public speaking program for much of his tenure there. "I learned as much from him about the art and craft of teaching as any other person," said Redmond Finney, who began as a young teacher under Mr. Pine's tutelage and went on to serve as the school's headmaster from 1968 to 1992.
NEWS
April 4, 1992
When President Bush's popularity sagged, White House chief of staff John Sununu had to go. That failed to distract anyone who disliked the president. What bothered them was the recession, not Mr. Sununu's brusque manner. Still, almost any president would have done the same thing. In fact, the president of France, Francois Mitterrand, just did.Since the local elections last month repudiated the ruling Socialists, allowing them a scant 18.3 percent of the vote, all France was waiting for him to replace Prime Minister Edith Cresson.
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