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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 11, 1990
PARIS -- The French government appears eager to drop prosecution of Rene Bousquet, the French Vichy chief of police who ordered the deportation of Jewish children, on charges of crimes against humanity.Recent reports that French President Francois Mitterrand had told associates he wanted to see the Bousquet case "buried" have aroused anger among survivors of the Holocaust, their families and human rights advocates. They are interpreting Mr. Mitterrand's alleged remarks as a signal that other French war criminals also will never be brought to trial.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
The specter of the Holocaust came to Annapolis on Monday as survivors and their descendants sought what they view as justice in memory of a witness who couldn't be there. Leo Bretholz of Pikesville had been scheduled to testify on behalf of a bill to prohibit an American subsidiary of the French national railway from building a light rail line in the Washington suburbs unless it pays reparations for its role in transporting Nazi victims to European death camps. Bretholz, who escaped from a cattle car carrying Jews and other Nazi victims to Auschwitz in 1942, died in his sleep Saturday, a few days after his 93rd birthday.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Bryant and Elizabeth Bryant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
SIMIANE-LA-ROTONDE, France - Here and there in the highest plateaus of Haute Provence, the scent of heady lavender still mixes with sun-baked pine as tractors slice through the last of the season's purple flowers. At the sprawling farm of Alain Cassan, in the rolling hills of southeastern France, the harvest has ended. Trailers are stacked high with neatly tied bunches of lavender. In the coming weeks, they will be dried, packed in 45-pound burlap bags and shipped to dealers. The journey ends at trendy boutiques in New York or Paris, where the flowers are sold as dried bouquets or in perfumed sachets.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | April 26, 2012
Are the French getting their Tea Party on? That's what an outsider looking at the country's first-round presidential voting results might have been led to believe. But, as with many things French, the reality is très compliquée . The weekend vote knocked out all but the two candidates long expected to square off in the May 6 final: Socialist Francois Hollande (28.6 percent) and incumbent center-right President Nicolas Sarkozy (27.2 percent). This isn't the story, though. The most striking news is the 17.9 percent score by Marine Le Pen's National Front party.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | October 25, 1990
PARIS -- French government officials promised yesterday that no negotiations had occurred between Paris and Baghdad to bring about Iraq's release of all its French hostages and pledged that France would continue to back United Nations resolutions to end the Iraqi takeover of Kuwait.Analysts said the Iraqi move, however, placed France in the position of eventual mediator if a diplomatic solution to the Persian Gulf standoff seemed likely.France "cannot but express satisfaction at a unilateral decision which it neither sought nor tried to negotiate, [but]
NEWS
July 29, 1995
The trouble plaguing the investigation into the terrorist bombing of a commuter train under the River Seine in Paris on Tuesday is that there are too many suspects.France in recent decades has witnessed terrorism against Armenians, Jews, Iranian dissidents, Turkish dissidents, Syrian dissidents, leading French industrialists and France itself. Suspects have included Hezbollah, several governments, French anarchists. The most recent terrorism has been by Algerian extremists, some of it against each other.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Martin Marietta-Lockheed Group won't cut its $385 million offer for units of the LTV Corp. if Congress bars their sale to a team led by a French company for $450 million, Martin Marietta's chairman and CEO, Norman Augustine, said yesterday.Rumors have arisen that Martin Marietta-Lockheed would slash its price to $250 million if Congress blocked the sale of the defense company units to Thomson-CSF Inc., the head of the Bethesda-based company told the House Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
His eyes still light up when he talks about the war -- even after 80 years. And later this month, 105-year-old Paul W. Englar's gritty memories as a doughboy will come full circle.The Carroll County resident has been named a Chevalier of the National Order of the Legion of Honor by the French government. He's one of 600 living American veterans of World War I who fought in France and are being honored as part of last year's 80th anniversary of the Armistice, French officials said.Recognition for his role as a Morse code radio operator in the trenches against German troops will take place July 23 in a ceremony at Carroll Lutheran Village outside Westminster, where Englar lives.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1991
WARNING: YOU ARE NOW ENTERING A BASEBALL-FREE ZONE. THIS COLUMN DOES NOT PROVIDE ANY NOSTALGIA, INFORMATION OR OBSERVATIONS ON THE OLD STADIUM, THE NEW STADIUM, OR ANY POSSIBLE FUTURE STADIUMS. SORRY, I WAS JUST TOO EMOTIONALLY DRAINED.*Enemies are a necessary thing. They give us goals and direction. They give us someone to whom we can feel superior. They motivate us to strive harder.Having just lost the Soviet Union as an enemy, we are lucky, therefore, that another country has come along to fill the void:France.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2006
PARIS -- A year after the deaths of two teens triggered weeks of arson and rioting, residents and authorities fear that disaffected youths are poised for a renewed cycle of violence. In recent days, hoodlums set fire to four buses, and other incidents of arson and ambushes of police have accelerated in the past several weeks. The attacks suggest that the anger and frustration of impoverished youths has yet to dissipate and that the measures tried so far by the French government were insufficient, said people who work and live in the restless suburbs of Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
The French cartoon that won the Oscar for best animated short this year, "Logorama," is a giddy, nightmarish chase that wrings nonstop surprise and a horrible beauty from a vision of corporate logos and trademark characters taking over the Earth and all creation. Talk to the founders of the "Festival Image" that starts today at Maryland Institute College of Art — including Sylvain Cornevaux, deputy director of the Alliance Francaise de Washington, and Laurence Arcadias, co-chair of MICA's animation department — and you feel there was something fated about French cartoonists tackling America's advertising culture and remolding it into a vision of apocalypse.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | July 21, 2007
Constellation Energy Group said yesterday that it is teaming with Electricite de France SA, the world's largest operator of nuclear power plants, to develop and invest in a fleet of new nuclear reactors that if licensed would be among the first new ones in the U.S. in a generation. The stated-controlled French company will invest $625 million in a joint venture with Constellation called UniStar Nuclear Energy LLC. UniStar plans to license and build reactors based on a French design being adapted for the United States.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2006
PARIS -- A year after the deaths of two teens triggered weeks of arson and rioting, residents and authorities fear that disaffected youths are poised for a renewed cycle of violence. In recent days, hoodlums set fire to four buses, and other incidents of arson and ambushes of police have accelerated in the past several weeks. The attacks suggest that the anger and frustration of impoverished youths has yet to dissipate and that the measures tried so far by the French government were insufficient, said people who work and live in the restless suburbs of Paris.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2006
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia --Armed rebels entered N'Djamena, the capital of Chad, before dawn yesterday, but government troops beat them back in fierce fighting, prompting embattled President Idriss Deby to take to the airwaves and declare, "The situation is under control." That might have been an overstatement. The rebels, known as the United Front for Democratic Change, vowed to continue their effort to overthrow Deby before the May 3 presidential election. An undetermined number of rebels crept into the capital early yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 22, 2004
LONDON - Two French journalists kidnapped in Iraq in August were released yesterday and turned over to French authorities in Baghdad. "I have profound joy in announcing to you that Christian Chesnot and Georges Malbrunot have been freed by the Islamic Army," said Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin, who interrupted a debate in the French Senate to announce the news. Senators erupted with applause and a standing ovation. The two, who were in Amman, Jordan, last night, are expected to arrive in France today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2004
PARIS - Governments come and governments go, and yesterday the French government went and came back again. Two days after his Conservative Party was soundly defeated by the leftist opposition in regional elections, President Jacques Chirac accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin and fired his government. Then he turned around and asked Raffarin to stay on and form a new administration. The news came with no explanation in a two-sentence statement from the Elysee Palace: "Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin handed the government's resignation to the president of the republic, who accepted it. He named Jean-Pierre Raffarin prime minister and ordered him to form a new government."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | July 4, 1992
PARIS -- Thomson-CSF, a state-owned French defense electronics company, is looking to Northrop Corp. to help it continue its planned purchase of LTV Corp.'s missile division after strong opposition to the acquisition from Congress and the U.S. aerospace industry."We are exploring possibilities with Northrop," said Colin Boardman, Thomson-CSF's communications director. He declined to give details of the talks but said there could be an announcement soon.Thomson-CSF has been stung by criticism that it would effectively be taking part of the U.S. defense industry into French government ownership and that it could spirit away sensitive U.S. missile technology for the benefit of the French government.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | September 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Fear not, Volvo fans, your solid car will not be replaced with a rattly Renault any time soon.That, at least, was the message brought to America by Pehr G. Gyllenhammar, Volvo's longtime chief executive and head of the committee that oversees the new Renault-Volvo car company.Mr. Gyllenhammar, on the last leg of a two-continent trip to convince analysts and consumers that the two companies' merger was a good idea, said Renault-Volvo RVA would keep a divided product line.Up to $5 billion would be saved by the end of the decade on joint purchasing and development of basic technology, he said, but the company would produce two distinctly different lines of cars.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 7, 2004
PARIS - Mahmoud Bourassi speaks softly about tolerance here, about the need for his country to respect his religion and for people of his faith to remember that beyond being Muslim they are also French. To many of his countrymen, though, Bourassi is someone they should fear. They see him as a terrorist in the making, if not a terrorist already, a young man moving toward a brand of religious extremism responsible for everything from the sexual mutilation of thousands of French Muslim girls to deadly attacks on Western targets around the world.
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