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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Check out this Travel & Leisure round-up of the best french fries in the U.S. There's Thrasher's! "It's hard to beat a bucket of hand-cut spuds that have been fried in peanut oil with skins on," the blurb says, "especially when served with nothing more than a little salt and vinegar. "
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NEWS
October 26, 2013
I guess I wasn't surprised by your recent editorial slamming colas and other sugary beverages ( "A new kind of cola war," Oct. 22). It's obvious you firmly believe that no one is ever responsible for anything that happens in his or her life because it's always someone else's fault. I was waiting to read a sentence that blamed George Bush, but thankfully that road was left untraveled, for a change. I grew up in the 1970s, and colas (Coke and many others) were as available then as they are now, possibly even more so. Our high school had a vending machine that dispensed soft drinks.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | October 24, 1990
Do you love french fries, but worry about the fat they absorb during frying? These oven fries have less than half as much fat as homemade french-fried potatoes and about one-third as much fat as a serving of fast-food fries.Oven Fries4 small baking potatoes (about 1 pound total)1 tablespoon margarine, melted1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese1/2 teaspoon garlic salt1/4 teaspoon paprika1/8 teaspoon onion powder (optional)Non-stick spray coatingScrub potatoes thoroughly. Cut each potato lengthwise into eight slices.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 2, 2013
Today we revisit one of my favorite topics. Tomatoes. I bet you thought I was going to write about the government shutdown, but giving Congress ink is like giving a fool a microphone. So let's talk about tomatoes. I went to my favorite farmers' market in Annapolis this weekend and greedily filled my basket. I am hoarding against the possibility that a sudden storm will arrive and, although we need the rain, cause the last tomatoes in the field to swell and split and rot. The drought actually has been a boon to us tomato lovers.
NEWS
By Milton Bates | January 25, 1991
DEAR Dave:You'll never guess who I was thinking about today. Smart as you are, Dave, there's just no way you'd come up with this one.Charlie Spikes. Yes, that Charlie Spikes, Louisiana-born, journeyman outfielder -- mostly with the Indians -- in the '70s. Batted .246 lifetime and just fair with the glove. The best thing old Charlie had going for him in the bigs was his name.That name evokes the tragic story of the french fries jinx, right? Mid-summer 1975 (you were just 10 then, Dave) and Cleveland had come into that great ballpark, Memorial Stadium, at a time when our high-flying Birds were neck-and-neck with the Red Sox. Under new manager Frank Robinson, the Indians, then as now, were something less than a .500 ball club.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 25, 2001
McDonald's Corp. has apologized for not being upfront about its use of beef extract in french fries sold in the United States, an ingredient the company calls "natural flavor" in its nutrition brochures. The apology comes after American Hindus and vegetarians sued the world's largest restaurant chain this month in Seattle, accusing the company of deliberately misleading its U.S. customers. The plaintiffs said they believed they were eating vegetarian fries because McDonald's has marketed its fries since 1990 as cooked in "100 percent vegetable oil."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 7, 1994
OTHELLO, Wash. -- More than 30 years ago, the king of fast-food hamburgers and the patriarch of potatoes came together for a meeting that would change the American meal and create a new breed of corporate farmer.Ray Kroc, founder of McDonald's nationwide restaurant chain, and J. R. Simplot, the food processing and chemical magnate in Idaho, forged a deal to make perfect french-fried potatoes -- upright, bright, cheap and free of molds.They would look the same whether they were sold on the Jersey shore or in a drive-through in Idaho.
NEWS
By Virginia A. Smith and Virginia A. Smith,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 19, 2004
These days, you might shun french fries for political reasons - remember freedom fries? But Jeanne M. Manson, for one, believes they're perfectly safe to eat. That might not be noteworthy except for this: A 2002 Swedish study found that frying or baking starchy carbohydrates such as potatoes at high temperatures produced acrylamide, a white, odorless chemical known to cause cancer and reproductive problems in laboratory rats fed high doses. Suddenly, people wondered: Are we talking killer carbs here?
NEWS
By Andrew Martin and Andrew Martin,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - Anyone trying to add more fruits and vegetables to their diet might have just gotten an unlikely assist from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Based on a little-noticed change to obscure federal rules, the USDA now defines frozen french fries as "fresh vegetables." As bizarre as it might sound, a federal judge in Texas last week endorsed the USDA's decision in a court case, saying the term "fresh vegetables" was ambiguous. The USDA quietly changed the regulations last year at the behest of the french fry industry, which has spent the past five decades pushing for a revision to the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act. The revision was made at a time when the reputation of french fries has been under siege.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL & JANE STERN and MICHAEL & JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | October 7, 1990
CHICAGO -- As plump Polish sausages sizzle on the grill, the Dog Haus counterman dips a ladle into the fryer (whence cometh the French-fried potatoes) to get some hot fat to pour over the grilling tube steaks. The grease helps give them a blackened, crisp skin; it also gives them a look of glistening, luscious avoirdupois. Here are some of the heaviest, greasiest Polish sausages in a city where Polish sausages, along with their beefy brothers, hot dogs, are matters of serious culinary consideration.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Once in a while, I'm reminded at how my younger son really is a tween - that awkward age between a child and a teenager. Not quite 12, he is just a bit shorter than I am. His voice is growing deeper and his shoulders broader. He used to want me to leave the hall light on until he fell asleep. Now he goes to bed and shuts the door. On the shelf where he used to have action figures, he now has cologne and deodorant. He tries on different hats, shirts and jeans, trying to get the right look.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Check out this Travel & Leisure round-up of the best french fries in the U.S. There's Thrasher's! "It's hard to beat a bucket of hand-cut spuds that have been fried in peanut oil with skins on," the blurb says, "especially when served with nothing more than a little salt and vinegar. "
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Since the Towson Times' story last week about the closure of Harry Little Submarines in Anneslie, we've received comments from residents and former residents who wanted to share their memories of the shop. For those starving for a little local nostalgia, here's a lunchtime special - some of those comments. You can join the feast by responding in the comments section below, or by sending your own recollections to jmeoli@tribune.com. Bon appetit. An icon of my childhood Growing up in Anneslie, Harry Little's was an icon of my childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2012
Rye is the kind of bar every neighborhood wishes for — creative takes on classic drinks, friendly service, warm atmosphere and, as a bonus, talent in the kitchen. It might be a bar, first and foremost, but thanks to chef Benjamin Polson, Rye is also a surprisingly good restaurant. Owner Ryan Perlberg, whose family also owns the nearby upscale hot dog joint Stuggy's, didn't plan to open a restaurant, but he realized that when people go out for a drink, they also need to eat. Atmospherically, Rye feels like a bar, with friendly service and more cocktails than entrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Dorsey, b | August 9, 2011
She's played in indie horror films, in plenty of tough girl roles, and with multiple theater groups, and she recently “signed a contract in blood” (her words!) with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society. Julia Pickens, 27, has been acting since she was 14 and earned her degree in theater at Towson University. Now, she's taking on the role of Mandi in the play “Asking Questions,” a Baltimore Playwrights Festival production at Fells Point Corner Theater, premiering Friday. Check out this local actress's tastes.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
Well, where else would you celebrate National French Fries Day but on the Ocean City boardwalk, shoving down handfuls of Thrashers fries . (Don't forget the vinegar!) I guess you could go to Belgium, where the idea of cooking potatoes in oil is believed to have originated. But, really, who even knew there was such a day? And with recent studies that show French fried potatoes are certain to pack on the pounds - we didn't need a study to tell us that! - this seems a too-perfect opportunity to fry up some love for the much-maligned potato.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 16, 2003
OK, IF NOBODY else will do it, I'm going to patch up this spat between the United States and France. As you know, our two nations are not getting along, as evidenced by the recent high-level meeting in Paris, during which French President Jacques Chirac and U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, in what aides described as "a frank exchange of views," bit each other. Yes, relations are at an all-time low. The French view us as a bunch of fat, simplistic, SUV- driving, gum-chewing, gun-shooting, mall-dwelling, John Wayne cowboys who put ketchup on everything we eat, including breath mints.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | July 13, 2011
Let me see if I understand. Medical researchers at Harvard University followed a couple of hundred thousand nurses for as long as 35 years and came to the remarkable conclusion that, though we all gain weight as we age, potatoes — french fries and potato chips, in particular — will cause us to gain more weight. And, in other ground-breaking news from the study, watching television also causes you to gain more weight. I am not sure where to go with this. Except to say that the real headline might be that desserts don't cause you to gain nearly as much weight as you think.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | July 13, 2011
Let me see if I understand. Medical researchers at Harvard University followed a couple of hundred thousand nurses for as long as 35 years and came to the remarkable conclusion that, though we all gain weight as we age, potatoes — french fries and potato chips, in particular — will cause us to gain more weight. And, in other ground-breaking news from the study, watching television also causes you to gain more weight. I am not sure where to go with this. Except to say that the real headline might be that desserts don't cause you to gain nearly as much weight as you think.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
A weekly round-up of juicy bits from food and dining blogs. Some of these I twittered as they appeared. You can follow my tweets on this page, in the box at the right. I posted a few of them on the new Baltimore Diner facebook page. 1.) The story about the Taiwanese blogger who was sued for her negative review was everywhere. Here's a good account in the Wall Street Journal. Yelpers debated it (Eater) 2.) Are fries to blame? Marion Nestle weighs in on the recent New England Journal of Medicine study that concluded that " specific dietary and lifestyle factors are independently associated with long-term weight gain.
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