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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer Staff writer Rob Kasper contributed to this story | July 15, 1992
The Peabody Court Hotel, the elegant Mount Vernon inn that is home to the celebrated Conservatory restaurant, has lost its chef in what might be called "the Great Squab Squabble."Michael Gettier, under whom the Conservatory became one of only two restaurants in Baltimore to earn a four-diamond rating from the American Automobile Association, was one of a half-dozen top managers who either quit or were fired in a bitter upheaval at the luxury hotel and restaurant last week.Mr. Gettier says the hotel's new management company told him the restaurant would switch from classic French cuisine to "midlevel" American cooking within two or three weeks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
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NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | May 18, 2011
A group of 30 Baltimore middle-school students recently returned from a weeklong trip to Montreal, where they visited museums, sampled French cuisine and otherwise immersed themselves in a foreign culture, most of them for the first time.
EXPLORE
By Laura Barnhardt Cech | April 2, 2013
The Pissaladiere Nicoise, an onion tart studded with black olives and anchovies, is being passed around to the dinner guests while the Navets a la Champenoise, a turnip casserole, and braised stuffed breast of veal finish in the oven. A French Frisee salad with lardons (bacon) and quail eggs will be served, followed by a dessert course of Tarte aux Pommes (apple tart) and Reine de Saba Cake, a chocolatey confection also known as Queen of Sheba Cake. In other words, it's fancy-schmancy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer Staff writer Rob Kasper contributed to this article | July 15, 1992
The Peabody Court Hotel, the elegant Mount Vernon inn that is home to the celebrated Conservatory restaurant, has lost its chef in what might be called "the Great Squab Squabble."Michael Gettier, under whom the Conservatory became one of only two restaurants in Baltimore to earn a four-diamond rating from the American Automobile Association, was one of a half-dozen top managers who either quit or were fired in a bitter upheaval at the luxury hotel and restaurant last week.Mr. Gettier said the hotel's new management company told him the restaurant would switch from classic French cuisine to "midlevel" American cooking within two or three weeks.
TRAVEL
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2007
Fleurie boasts the best restaurant in the area, the Auberge du Cep. Owner Chantal Chagny is something of a local legend: She started out doing classic French cuisine -- "elaborate dishes with elaborate sauces, lobster, all that sort of thing," she said -- and won two Michelin stars, achieved this year by 65 restaurants in France. Then six years ago, she decided to simplify her life and her restaurant. She rewrote the menu to focus on ingredients from the surrounding provinces -- no more lobster, but some of the finest meat, fowl and freshwater fish in France.
FEATURES
By Luaine Lee and Luaine Lee,Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | November 8, 1992
C You don't need to fly the Atlantic for a flavor of Europe. The 37-square-mile Caribbean island of St. Martin/St. Maarten offers two countries for the price of one.It is the smallest island in the Caribbean that is occupied by two different nations -- France and the Netherlands.Divided into a northern and southern half, legend claims that a walking contest between a Frenchman and a Dutchman determined the dividing line. But the salt beds, greatly prized in older times, probably encouraged the Dutch to annex the southern half.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
EXPLORE
By Laura Barnhardt Cech | April 2, 2013
The Pissaladiere Nicoise, an onion tart studded with black olives and anchovies, is being passed around to the dinner guests while the Navets a la Champenoise, a turnip casserole, and braised stuffed breast of veal finish in the oven. A French Frisee salad with lardons (bacon) and quail eggs will be served, followed by a dessert course of Tarte aux Pommes (apple tart) and Reine de Saba Cake, a chocolatey confection also known as Queen of Sheba Cake. In other words, it's fancy-schmancy.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
La Provence, the fashionable French restaurant in the Morris Mechanic Theater building, has been closed and put up for sale by its owner, who is turning his attention to franchising his rotisserie chicken operation."
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
  Annapolitans are loyal, and the city has an impressive list of long-running restaurants. Once a place clicks, it tends to stay. That's not too surprising for a political town. Call it the incumbency effect. In 1986, Jean-Louis Evennou opened the original Cafe Normandie on Main Street in Annapolis. Five years later, he and his wife, Suzanne, moved the restaurant five doors down, where it's been ever since, serving a reasonably priced menu of French cafe classics like escargots, bouef bourguignonne, bouillabaisse and roast duck.
NEWS
By Michael Cross-Barnet | May 18, 2011
A group of 30 Baltimore middle-school students recently returned from a weeklong trip to Montreal, where they visited museums, sampled French cuisine and otherwise immersed themselves in a foreign culture, most of them for the first time.
TRAVEL
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2007
Fleurie boasts the best restaurant in the area, the Auberge du Cep. Owner Chantal Chagny is something of a local legend: She started out doing classic French cuisine -- "elaborate dishes with elaborate sauces, lobster, all that sort of thing," she said -- and won two Michelin stars, achieved this year by 65 restaurants in France. Then six years ago, she decided to simplify her life and her restaurant. She rewrote the menu to focus on ingredients from the surrounding provinces -- no more lobster, but some of the finest meat, fowl and freshwater fish in France.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
Cafe de Paris, a French bistro formerly in Laurel, has found a new home in Columbia, where owner Erik Rochard wants to do more than offer excellent food. He wants to change the public's perception of French cuisine. "I think that the French restaurants in all the big cities in the United Sates are a bit over-priced, high-end and fancy," he said. "I wanted to show that a bistro concept - a place where you can come in casually and find good food at a reasonable price in a nice atmosphere - has a place in an average-sized city.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2001
ORLEANS, France - If there is a Gallic version of hell, it surely must be this: to watch as food you love is outlawed or deemed dangerous, and to hear that eating it may lead to sickness and death. Last month, Philippe Bardau, the top-rated chef in this former royal capital on the Loire, took all beef-based dishes off the menu of his 19-table restaurant, which boasts a star in the Michelin guide. No one, Bardau says, dare order his Bavarian beef tenderloin or veal cutlet garnished with veal sweetbread ravioli anymore.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2000
JEN KAPLAN'S eighth-grade French classes at Patuxent Valley Middle School have spent the past two weeks preparing for this week's brief opening of the Millennium Cafe, Kaplan's salute to French culture. As she has for the past three years -- and before that in the Baltimore schools where she taught -- Kaplan has had her students run a bistro for faculty and family. It's a complex undertaking for the second-year French scholars. First, they have to learn food and restaurant vocabulary.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2000
JEN KAPLAN'S eighth-grade French classes at Patuxent Valley Middle School have spent the past two weeks preparing for this week's brief opening of the Millennium Cafe, Kaplan's salute to French culture. As she has for the past three years -- and before that in the Baltimore schools where she taught -- Kaplan has had her students run a bistro for faculty and family. It's a complex undertaking for the second-year French scholars. First, they have to learn food and restaurant vocabulary.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
  Annapolitans are loyal, and the city has an impressive list of long-running restaurants. Once a place clicks, it tends to stay. That's not too surprising for a political town. Call it the incumbency effect. In 1986, Jean-Louis Evennou opened the original Cafe Normandie on Main Street in Annapolis. Five years later, he and his wife, Suzanne, moved the restaurant five doors down, where it's been ever since, serving a reasonably priced menu of French cafe classics like escargots, bouef bourguignonne, bouillabaisse and roast duck.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
La Provence, the fashionable French restaurant in the Morris Mechanic Theater building, has been closed and put up for sale by its owner, who is turning his attention to franchising his rotisserie chicken operation."
FEATURES
By Luaine Lee and Luaine Lee,Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | November 8, 1992
C You don't need to fly the Atlantic for a flavor of Europe. The 37-square-mile Caribbean island of St. Martin/St. Maarten offers two countries for the price of one.It is the smallest island in the Caribbean that is occupied by two different nations -- France and the Netherlands.Divided into a northern and southern half, legend claims that a walking contest between a Frenchman and a Dutchman determined the dividing line. But the salt beds, greatly prized in older times, probably encouraged the Dutch to annex the southern half.
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