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By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
It's barely 8:30 a.m. in Mess Hall 455 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and 240 pounds of lightly breaded legs, thighs and breasts are already sizzling and popping in two deep vats of oil in the galley. Retired Marine David French is about to toss 105 pounds of cubed potatoes into the deep fry. Steps away, Philippines-born Evelyn Edwards is busy stirring 20 pounds of ziti, Creole sauce and gravy in three 60-gallon kettles. And Gloria Crawford, a former Marine who hails from South Carolina, is at the grill flipping slabs of liver smothered in onions and sauteed with salt, pepper and a palm-full of garlic.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
Just two years ago, Bill and Jennifer Bartley were living on a three-acre property in bucolic Mount Airy. But with their grown children moving on, they were ready for a complete change of lifestyle. So in March 2009, the Bartleys exchanged views of the countryside for a harborside city view from their new condominium at the Ritz-Carlton Residences in downtown Baltimore. "Once the kids left, we knew we'd be ready to move," Jennifer Bartley recalled. "This 'lock and leave' lifestyle is perfect for us. " Moreover, the traveling couple wanted to turn the page to a new and elegant chapter in their lives as empty nesters.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 25, 1997
Can the same script make for a great film twice, even when the movies are shot 40 years apart? Watch Showtime tonight and find out.First comes the pay-cable channel's 1997 version of "Twelve Angry Men" (9 p.m.-10: 40 p.m.), which sticks 12 men in a jury room on the hottest day of summer and lets them have at it. All but 1 are convinced the defendant -- a Hispanic teen charged with murdering his father -- is guilty. Only one, in this case Jack Lemmon, believes in his innocence; yet that one juror's intransigence keeps the rest from going home, and his attempts to sway their opinions open all sorts of cans of worms.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
If you want to spend April in Paris but can't afford it, a short hop to Philadelphia may at least give you that French feeling. After nearly three years of planning, the city kicks off the first Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts this weekend, featuring 1,500 artists and 135 exhibits, performances, lectures and films, all paying homage to Paris. The theme of the festival at the city's Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts focuses on Paris from 1910 to 1920, celebrating a time when great artists, including Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall and Ernest Hemmingway, were gravitating to the French city.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 25, 2007
Paradigm 179 Main St., Annapolis 410-626-6030 Open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday Annapolis isn't just for tourists anymore. Realizing that the Historic District was ready to move beyond its T-shirt shop roots, Jessica Jordan opened Paradigm. "Annapolis needed a fun boutique with clothing at approachable prices," said Jordan, who worked previously for the state legislature and for the state Board of Elections as its chief financial officer. "We have quite a range of men's and women's clothing, but the items we carry are ones we think are smart.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | March 30, 2003
Prom season may be two months away, but some promgoers have been thinking about the big night for months already. Just in case you haven't, here's a crash course in what's hot in prom wear this year, according to Seventeen's all-prom issue, TeenPROM magazine and YM Prom (all on newsstands right now.) Dress style everyone is wearing: Strapless, tea length and with a full skirt. Think feminine and sexy but not cheap and flashy. It's Doris Day, Joanie Loves Chachi and tremendously classic.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 18, 1994
It's not what you'd call a powerhouse night of television, unless you're a college basketball fan. If so, and you're looking for hoops, there it is -- on CBS, for most of the afternoon and much of the evening. Otherwise, the evening's highlight is an episode of "The X-Files" -- one that was supposed to be last Friday's highlight.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (noon-5 p.m., 8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Eight more hours of opening-round coverage, occupying most of the afternoon and all of CBS' prime time.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 2001
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, recently immersed in Russian, Czech and Norwegian music, is turning its attention to French fare this weekend and made a filling meal out of it. The chef is George Pehlivanian, a talented American with a French connection - he won a conducting competition in France a decade ago. And when he last visited the BSO in 1999, it was with a French twist, too - music by Saint-Saens, who's on this bill, along with Berlioz....
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
More brazen criminals armed with powerful guns have changed the nature of crime in Baltimore, according to a study of why the homicide rate continues to rise despite a sharp decrease in the number of shootings.While city residents are less likely now than in the past two years to be hit by random gunfire, those who are wounded stand a far greater chance of dying before reaching a hospital.A team of experts examined thousands of shooting and hospital reports to determine why 16.7 percent of shooting victims died last year, compared with 11 percent in 1993.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | April 28, 2009
Top executives of Constellation Energy Group took the unusual step of appearing before state utility regulators Monday, hoping to ensure approval of the deal that helped rescue the firm from bankruptcy. Chief Executive Officer Mayo A. Shattuck III and Vice Chairman Michael J. Wallace testified before the state Public Service Commission in favor of Constellation's $4.5 billion nuclear energy partnership with the French utility Electricite de France. The deal with EDF gives the French company a 49.99 percent stake in Constellation's nuclear power business.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 10, 2008
Afew months ago, while my husband and I were in Paris working for several weeks, I noticed an unusual soup listed on the chalkboard outside a cafe in our neighborhood. I wasn't planning to eat lunch there but was so intrigued by the sound of a carrot-and-coconut soup that I stopped in. The waitress asked if I wanted the potage cold or warm, and I opted for the latter. Several minutes later, she returned with a bowl of piping-hot soup that was thick, creamy and a lovely orange hue. One sip and I knew I wanted the recipe.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 25, 2007
Paradigm 179 Main St., Annapolis 410-626-6030 Open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday Annapolis isn't just for tourists anymore. Realizing that the Historic District was ready to move beyond its T-shirt shop roots, Jessica Jordan opened Paradigm. "Annapolis needed a fun boutique with clothing at approachable prices," said Jordan, who worked previously for the state legislature and for the state Board of Elections as its chief financial officer. "We have quite a range of men's and women's clothing, but the items we carry are ones we think are smart.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 10, 2007
My Best Friend, like so many French farces, tries to conjure a laughing soul from a comedy machine. Happily, even when the machine breaks down, the soul remains. Patrice Leconte's wide-screen situation comedy about a self-centered art dealer, Francois Coiste (Daniel Autheil), who bets his business partner, Catherine (Julie Gayet), that he can produce a best buddy in 10 days, has an enveloping friendly spirit that fills the cracks when the plot breaks into smithereens. Even the setup contains irritating flaws: For example, Catherine sets the wager in motion because Francois has never asked about her private life - she jolts him when she introduces him to her attractive lesbian lover.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
It's barely 8:30 a.m. in Mess Hall 455 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and 240 pounds of lightly breaded legs, thighs and breasts are already sizzling and popping in two deep vats of oil in the galley. Retired Marine David French is about to toss 105 pounds of cubed potatoes into the deep fry. Steps away, Philippines-born Evelyn Edwards is busy stirring 20 pounds of ziti, Creole sauce and gravy in three 60-gallon kettles. And Gloria Crawford, a former Marine who hails from South Carolina, is at the grill flipping slabs of liver smothered in onions and sauteed with salt, pepper and a palm-full of garlic.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 18, 2002
PARIS -- It is not the new currency that strikes this returning visitor's eye. The euro has been accepted, and the franc retired, without much fuss. Nor is it the mobile phone that hangs from nearly every French citizen like an earring. Nor is it the Benetton on the Champs-Elysees or The Gap on the Rue de Commerce that seem like icons of change and globalization. On this bright April day, as I leave the much demeaned and very crowded McDonald's where I have been allowed to indulge my great-nephew in not-so-French fries as a nod to his dual citizenship, I confront an image much more surprising: Crowds of young French men and women walking and eating their way down the street.
NEWS
July 13, 2002
The wrong site selected for visitors center The Sun is right. Baltimore's decision to locate a new visitor center adjacent to the Harborplace Light Street pavilion is wrong ("... not another ice cream stand," editorial, June 17). Baltimore needs such a facility, but a better location can be found. When the people of Baltimore voted to support the development of the Inner Harbor, the city agreed to protect the space between Harborplace and the Maryland Science Center from further development.
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