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French Bread

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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 8, 1999
A bowl of cold cereal and milk is fine during the work week. Nothing like milk splashing on those flakes to wake you up. No distractions to that breakfast. But on the weekend, prepare something pleasurable. You don't have to rush. The day is long, and you have plenty of time to enjoy it.To set the mood, imagine yourself in the French Riviera on a brilliantly sunny day and think of what you'd cook.You'd probably start with an oversized mug of cafe au lait. Begin by brewing extra-strength coffee.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 20, 2012
When it comes to weeknight dinners, some of us are not big fans of planning ahead. Oh, we might take something out of the freezer in the morning, then figure out what to do with it later in the day. Not for us all the a.m. prep work, so the crock pot can do its thing all day. About 4 p.m., maybe even 5 p.m., is certainly soon enough to figure out what to do with the chicken or ground beef that's been defrosting all day. Which is why, when...
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FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1993
Here is a simple dish to prepare that is satisfying while fittin our Fast & Fresh time frame. The dish has an ancient history -- it has been said it was requested by Napoleon after his victory in the Battle of Marengo in the 1800's.Traditionally, the braised entree is made with chicken or veal, but I have chosen an economical cut of beef that can be prepared quickly. The beef chuck cubes are quickly seared and then simmered with tomatoes, baby onions, mushrooms, wine and herbs.I suggest serving it over crunchy slices of toasted French bread, but pasta or rice would also complement the Marengo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 22, 2007
Cafe de Paris, the nine-year-old French restaurant that moved from Laurel to Columbia in 2002, used to have a little deli on one side, for people who didn't want to sit down for a big meal. The problem, said restaurant owner Erik Rochard, was that delis were plentiful in Howard County, and serving his sandwiches on French bread wasn't enough to set himself apart from the competition. Then came the cartoon light bulb over his head, and he decided to convert the deli to a Crepe Cafe.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | May 22, 1991
Some of the most dreaded words in the English language in dual-income household are, "Honey, I'm bringing so and so (the boss, a client, etc.) home for dinner tonight."Whether "honey" is a male or female cook, the sudden announcement of a dinner guest is an equal opportunity headache.A good solution comes from Michael Dresser, Sun wine columnist, who often brings visiting winemakers home for dinner so he can sample their wines without too much time away from his family. His wife, Sheila, who also works full-time as an editor, never flinches at one of these visits because the Dressers have solved their after-work dinner problems with a quick, tasty and easy-to-make dish -- angel hair pasta with prosciutto and pine nuts.
FEATURES
By John Lehndorff and John Lehndorff,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 17, 1991
You walk in the door after a long summer's day of work and wilt as your face is hit by a tidal wave of heat that built up as the house baked all day in the sun.You are hungry for something real -- and healthful -- for dinner but turning on the stove or oven is out of the question.Walk directly to your barbecue. Throw in the coals or turn on the gas and light it up. While the grill is heating, run in the house and change into cool clothes.Look in the fridge and see what you have to grill: maybe some chicken or seafood or beef or tofu.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 7, 1999
Inviting friends in for drinks and hors d'oeuvres can be one of the most relaxed ways to entertain -- but not when the menu holds the host hostage in the kitchen. That won't happen if you plan simple-to-make-and-serve dishes you prepare entirely or partially ahead.If you're not serving guests dinner afterward, plan to have the hors d'oeuvres hearty and plentiful enough to cushion the effects of any alcohol you pour, and offer soft drinks or mineral water as well. Present an appealing variety of dishes, counting on four to six hors d'oeuvres per guest.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | March 8, 2000
From the hearth Specialty breads are on the rise. But you don't have to go to a bakery to buy these artisan loaves. Giant Food Inc. offers a wide selection of hearth-baked breads, several of which won the Gold Medal Taste Award from the American Tasting Institute in San Francisco. Varieties include Sesame Semolina, Kalamata Olive Rosemary, Cranberry Walnut and Roasted Garlic Parisien. Prices range from $2.79 to $5.69. Lunch choices Now, you can pick up lunch with your latte. In addition to coffee and pastries, Starbucks serves ready-made salads and sandwiches at several area stores, including Mount Washington and Timonium.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Restaurant Critic | February 20, 1993
Sascha's at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., (410) 332-0033. The concept is simple. The fixed price of $11 buys a seasonally appropriate soup, a choice of eight entrees, salad, good French bread and one of several simple desserts. The buffet opens an hour and a half before Center Stage performances, but you don't need a ticket to the play to eat there. Judging from the night we were there, the best bet might be one of the interesting cold entrees, like the Bangkok chicken salad with tabbouleh and marinated Oriental vegetables or the open-faced shrimp salad sandwich with two salads.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 20, 2012
When it comes to weeknight dinners, some of us are not big fans of planning ahead. Oh, we might take something out of the freezer in the morning, then figure out what to do with it later in the day. Not for us all the a.m. prep work, so the crock pot can do its thing all day. About 4 p.m., maybe even 5 p.m., is certainly soon enough to figure out what to do with the chicken or ground beef that's been defrosting all day. Which is why, when...
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
Olivia J. Walker of Baltimore requested a recipe for a hot crab dip. Her answer came from Ethel Lowe of Salisbury, N.C., who wrote: "Over the Fourth of July I went to visit my daughter, Barbara Kennedy, at Oak Island, N.C. I went into a store at Southport, N.C., and found a real nice seafood-secrets cookbook. "A lady requested a recipe for hot creamy crab dip, so I thought I would send the one in the book to her. My son-in-law has a nephew who has opened a restaurant in South Port, N.C., and he serves this hot creamy crab dip and says it doesn't stay around long before he is sold out."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
It's the holiday season, your house has been turned into Grand Central Station with guests dropping by at all hours. You need to whip up food in a flash. What to do? First, don't panic. Next, check your pantry and fridge. Believe it or not, you probably have the makings of some fabulous appetizers already in-house. Ritz crackers and Cheez Whiz are only for desperate scenarios, and that's not the situation you'll be in if you follow the advice of these local party pros. "There's nothing here that even the most inexperienced cook, just out of college or just married, can't do," says Harriet Dopkin, president and co-owner of the Classic Catering People in Owings Mills.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | July 30, 2000
You can get down and dirty -- or just watch -- next weekend at the 22nd annual Delaware State News Sandcastle Contest. More than 250 contestants are expected at Rehoboth Beach Saturday to play in the sand and try their hands at sculpting the winning entry for cash prizes, gift certificates and merchandise from area retailers. Last year's creations ran the gamut from Winnie the Pooh to medieval dragons and Jar Jar Binks of "Star Wars" fame. No real skills are necessary to be a contestant, other than a basic understanding of wet sand, and participants are allowed to work in teams of any size.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | March 8, 2000
From the hearth Specialty breads are on the rise. But you don't have to go to a bakery to buy these artisan loaves. Giant Food Inc. offers a wide selection of hearth-baked breads, several of which won the Gold Medal Taste Award from the American Tasting Institute in San Francisco. Varieties include Sesame Semolina, Kalamata Olive Rosemary, Cranberry Walnut and Roasted Garlic Parisien. Prices range from $2.79 to $5.69. Lunch choices Now, you can pick up lunch with your latte. In addition to coffee and pastries, Starbucks serves ready-made salads and sandwiches at several area stores, including Mount Washington and Timonium.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 8, 1999
A bowl of cold cereal and milk is fine during the work week. Nothing like milk splashing on those flakes to wake you up. No distractions to that breakfast. But on the weekend, prepare something pleasurable. You don't have to rush. The day is long, and you have plenty of time to enjoy it.To set the mood, imagine yourself in the French Riviera on a brilliantly sunny day and think of what you'd cook.You'd probably start with an oversized mug of cafe au lait. Begin by brewing extra-strength coffee.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | June 23, 1999
A recipe for sauteed Smithfield ham and crab meat was the request of Maria M. Berger of Ocean City. She wrote, "I tried to make it but failed. Then I had it at Busch's Chesapeake Restaurant, but the chef wouldn't part with the recipe."Barbara Kreft of Catonsville and Nancy Flack of Severna Park each responded with a recipe for Crab Norfolk, which was published in Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s "Maryland Classics," a collection of traditional and contemporary dishes.Virginia Brisbane Sekora of Greensburg, Pa., was looking for a recipe for Italian bread that she had made for 40 years and lost.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | August 14, 1991
It doesn't matter where you live, the lament is the same. Bakeries may be as ubiquitous as gas stations, but foodies always complain that good bread is hard to find. They blame the water, the humidity, the oven, the skill of the baker, the alignment of the planets.The problem is defining good bread is like arguing over who is more beautiful -- Julia Roberts or Michelle Pfeiffer. Few people agree. Some favor an airy French bread with a crisp crust that disintegrates into little pieces with the first bite.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 19, 1990
SOME OF the best comedians right now are women, and the best of the woman comedians is named Rita Rudner. She does great bits on men, and in one of them she says: "Men don't live well by themselves. They don't even live like people. They live like bears with furniture."I always wondered about that furniture part.Since the observations of female comedians, women lawyers, my aunt Gloria, the entire membership of the Hadassah, the League of Women Voters nationwide and the woman who lives across the street from me don't count as empirical evidence, researchers at the University of California at San Francisco have done a study that shows that men need to be married or they starve to death.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 7, 1999
Inviting friends in for drinks and hors d'oeuvres can be one of the most relaxed ways to entertain -- but not when the menu holds the host hostage in the kitchen. That won't happen if you plan simple-to-make-and-serve dishes you prepare entirely or partially ahead.If you're not serving guests dinner afterward, plan to have the hors d'oeuvres hearty and plentiful enough to cushion the effects of any alcohol you pour, and offer soft drinks or mineral water as well. Present an appealing variety of dishes, counting on four to six hors d'oeuvres per guest.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
For weeks after Lacey's Produce on Falls Road turned into Bonjour, a funky little coffee and gift shop, customers came in and wanted to know where the potatoes were."
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