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NEWS
July 5, 2001
ANYONE who missed the exhibition of 19th and 20th century French art from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Museum permanent collections, shown together here in the spring of 2000, can catch it in London at the Royal Academy of Arts. What with the effect of mad cow and foot-and-mouth diseases on tourism to the English countryside, air fare bargains to London may be more readily available than in most tourist seasons. London is not without incredible riches in French art of the period.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
If you want to spend April in Paris but can't afford it, a short hop to Philadelphia may at least give you that French feeling. After nearly three years of planning, the city kicks off the first Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts this weekend, featuring 1,500 artists and 135 exhibits, performances, lectures and films, all paying homage to Paris. The theme of the festival at the city's Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts focuses on Paris from 1910 to 1920, celebrating a time when great artists, including Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall and Ernest Hemmingway, were gravitating to the French city.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 24, 1999
This week, the Walters Art Gallery is set to open an extraordinary exhibition that is both a testament to the depth of its collections and a brilliant collaboration by its curators.Few institutions could produce on short notice a comprehensive survey of nearly 1,500 years of a major theme in art history using only the objects in their own collections.Yet in "Vive la France: French Treasures From the Middle Ages to Monet," the Walters has done just that -- and done it, moreover, with hundreds of exceptional pieces to spare, making an incredibly ambitious project look almost easy.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | October 3, 2006
That Baltimore's museums are awash in 19th-century French art is largely because of the efforts of George Lucas, a homegrown aesthete whose passion for the art of his time left a permanent mark on his native city. Lucas' contribution to Baltimore's cultural legacy is evident in the extensive collection of some 20,000 artworks that he amassed as an expatriate in France during the second half of the 19th century and bequeathed in 1909 to the Maryland Institute College of Art. If You Go A View Toward Paris: The Lucas Collection of 19th-Century French Art runs through Dec. 31 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | October 3, 2006
That Baltimore's museums are awash in 19th-century French art is largely because of the efforts of George Lucas, a homegrown aesthete whose passion for the art of his time left a permanent mark on his native city. Lucas' contribution to Baltimore's cultural legacy is evident in the extensive collection of some 20,000 artworks that he amassed as an expatriate in France during the second half of the 19th century and bequeathed in 1909 to the Maryland Institute College of Art. If You Go A View Toward Paris: The Lucas Collection of 19th-Century French Art runs through Dec. 31 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
McDaniel to present `Criminals in Love' McDaniel College theater students will present Criminals in Love, a play by George F. Walker, at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday in WMC Alumni Hall. Because of its adult language and story, the play is intended for mature audiences. The dark comedy tells the story of teen lovers Gail and Junior, and the problems they face because of Junior's family of felons. The play won the Chalmers Canadian Play Award in 1984 and the Governor General's Literary Award for Drama in 1985.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
ELIZABETH CATLETT has been classed as an African-American artist, a woman artist, a Mexican artist, a sculptor and a printmaker. The operative word for this major figure in North American art, born 84 years ago, is artist.So the 50-year retrospective of her work at the Baltimore Museum of Art may qualify as the annual show of African-American talent and themes for Black History Month that has become a fixture of American cultural institution life. But it is also the exploration of a major artist whose work is found in the BMA's permanent collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 31, 1999
How better to welcome an exhibition of French art than with a gala featuring French wines? Voila! That was the theme of "Toast the Walters -- The 1999 Gala" at the Walters Art Gallery.The evening began in the museum's Renaissance Sculpture court, with cocktails and preview tours of "Vive la France! French Treasures from the Middle Ages to Monet." The 503 well-attired art lovers included: event co-chairs Eddie and Sylvia Brown, Bill and Lisa Couper; Adena Testa, Walters board president; Gary Vikan, director of the Walters; Robert Feinberg and Phil English, board members; Larry Neale, retired U.S. Army colonel; Terry Morganthaler, community volunteer; Caprese Jackson Garrett, owner of Five Star Event Planning; Patrick Kerins, managing director of Grotech Capital Group; Wil Sirota, partner at Piper & Marbury; and Mike Gisriel, lobbyist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | November 4, 2004
Portraits of terror Irish artist Willie Doherty records the human reaction to terror. The work of Doherty, who was born in Derry, a Northern Ireland town in the heart of the Troubles, captures the fear and panic caused by bombings and assassinations that have characterized the conflict. He has used film installations and photography to create scenes that convey these emotions. On Wednesday, he will speak at Maryland Institute College of Art as part of its Politics of Landscape and Image lecture series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Mcnatt | September 17, 2006
Here are selected highlights of the fall visual arts season: Painter Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot's affectionate landscape A View Towards Paris is one of the jewels of the Baltimore Museum of Art collection; it's a highlight of the show of 19th-century French art (opening Oct. 1). The exhibit also marks the first time in nearly 25 years that the museum (10 Art Museum Drive) can be visited for free. On Dec. 12, Meditations on African Art: Light, the first of three themed exhibitions, opens with more than 40 works that explore light, color and pattern in the museum's African collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Mcnatt | September 17, 2006
Here are selected highlights of the fall visual arts season: Painter Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot's affectionate landscape A View Towards Paris is one of the jewels of the Baltimore Museum of Art collection; it's a highlight of the show of 19th-century French art (opening Oct. 1). The exhibit also marks the first time in nearly 25 years that the museum (10 Art Museum Drive) can be visited for free. On Dec. 12, Meditations on African Art: Light, the first of three themed exhibitions, opens with more than 40 works that explore light, color and pattern in the museum's African collection.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
McDaniel to present `Criminals in Love' McDaniel College theater students will present Criminals in Love, a play by George F. Walker, at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday in WMC Alumni Hall. Because of its adult language and story, the play is intended for mature audiences. The dark comedy tells the story of teen lovers Gail and Junior, and the problems they face because of Junior's family of felons. The play won the Chalmers Canadian Play Award in 1984 and the Governor General's Literary Award for Drama in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | November 4, 2004
Portraits of terror Irish artist Willie Doherty records the human reaction to terror. The work of Doherty, who was born in Derry, a Northern Ireland town in the heart of the Troubles, captures the fear and panic caused by bombings and assassinations that have characterized the conflict. He has used film installations and photography to create scenes that convey these emotions. On Wednesday, he will speak at Maryland Institute College of Art as part of its Politics of Landscape and Image lecture series.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 15, 2004
France may still be declasse to some folks in Washington, but, for at least the next few months, all things French will be warmly embraced throughout the Kennedy Center. The Festival of France, opening this week, promises a broad sampling of the country's cultural heritage, including classical music, jazz, theater, dance and film. In typical Kennedy Center fashion, the festival will offer several heady stars, among them luminous soprano Renee Fleming and indelible actress Jeanne Moreau, and will even make a little history.
NEWS
By Leonard Boasberg | May 23, 2003
SECRETARY OF State Colin L. Powell may be in Paris and President Bush plans to go to France soon, but let's not forget the administration's consideration of punishing the French for opposing the Iraq war. Among other measures for making the French suffer the consequences was the possibility of limiting French participation in international meetings and sidelining France in NATO discussions. Pretty piddling stuff, in my view. Why be so wimpish about what Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld so diplomatically refers to as the "old Europe"?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 4, 2003
Edouard Manet, the seminal figure of mid-19th-century French painting whose radical innovations fired the first shots of the modernist revolution, was a passionate admirer of Spanish art, particularly the works of the renowned 17th-century Spanish court painter Diego Rodriguez de Silva y Velazquez. In the 1860s, having become acquainted with the Spanish art in the Louvre, Manet traveled to Madrid to study the works of Velazquez and the other great Spanish masters -- Francisco de Zurbaran, Bartolome Esteban Murillo, Jusepe de Ribera and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes -- in their native setting.
NEWS
By Leonard Boasberg | May 23, 2003
SECRETARY OF State Colin L. Powell may be in Paris and President Bush plans to go to France soon, but let's not forget the administration's consideration of punishing the French for opposing the Iraq war. Among other measures for making the French suffer the consequences was the possibility of limiting French participation in international meetings and sidelining France in NATO discussions. Pretty piddling stuff, in my view. Why be so wimpish about what Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld so diplomatically refers to as the "old Europe"?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | October 21, 1999
Don GiovanniWitness the adventures and downfall of the mythical libertine Don Juan when the Baltimore Opera Company opens its 49th season today with Mozart's "Don Giovanni" at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. International opera star James Morris, who has sung in the world's major opera houses, returns to his hometown to sing the title role. (Greer Grimsley portrays Don Giovanni Sunday afternoon.) Hours are 7: 30 p.m. today and Wednesday, 8: 15 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 29, and 3 p.m. Sunday and Oct. 31. Tickets are $25-$112.
NEWS
July 5, 2001
ANYONE who missed the exhibition of 19th and 20th century French art from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Museum permanent collections, shown together here in the spring of 2000, can catch it in London at the Royal Academy of Arts. What with the effect of mad cow and foot-and-mouth diseases on tourism to the English countryside, air fare bargains to London may be more readily available than in most tourist seasons. London is not without incredible riches in French art of the period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 31, 1999
How better to welcome an exhibition of French art than with a gala featuring French wines? Voila! That was the theme of "Toast the Walters -- The 1999 Gala" at the Walters Art Gallery.The evening began in the museum's Renaissance Sculpture court, with cocktails and preview tours of "Vive la France! French Treasures from the Middle Ages to Monet." The 503 well-attired art lovers included: event co-chairs Eddie and Sylvia Brown, Bill and Lisa Couper; Adena Testa, Walters board president; Gary Vikan, director of the Walters; Robert Feinberg and Phil English, board members; Larry Neale, retired U.S. Army colonel; Terry Morganthaler, community volunteer; Caprese Jackson Garrett, owner of Five Star Event Planning; Patrick Kerins, managing director of Grotech Capital Group; Wil Sirota, partner at Piper & Marbury; and Mike Gisriel, lobbyist.
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