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By STEVE McKERROW | November 2, 1991
In a new movie premiering on cable tonight, star/producer Richard Dreyfuss is asked a simple question by his superior in the French army:"Why did he do it?" asks the general, referring to the allegedspying activity of one Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, the central figure in a celebrated turn-of-the century scandal that some historians believe may have contributed to the onset of World War I.One might ask the same question, however, about Mr. Dreyfuss the actor, and his handsomely mounted but curiously inert film, "Prisoner of Honor."
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Georges R. Garinther, a retired Army civilian engineer who studied ordnance noise and once examined the acoustics of the John F. Kennedy assassination, died March 9 of complications from heart disease and Alzheimer's disease at his daughter's Havre de Grace home. He was 79. An Army publication described Mr. Garinther as "an international authority on the effects of impulse noise on the hearing of soldiers and on the measurement and analysis of impulse and steady-state noise" when he retired in 1996 from the Aberdeen Proving Ground's Human Engineering Lab. "His job was to save the hearing of soldiers and allow them to communicate better," said a son, Geoff Garinther, a Lutherville resident.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Emma J. Hawkins, a member of the French Resistance and French army during World War II who later became a Howard County schoolteacher, died Aug. 1 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lookabout Manor, a Westminster assisted-living facility. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 92. Emma Josephine Guillot was born and raised in Grenoble, France. "Her father was an engineer and math professor who believed in education. She graduated from colleges and universities in France and Spain as well as an art school," said her son, Paul B. Hawkins of Finksburg, a retired Baltimore police officer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Emma J. Hawkins, a member of the French Resistance and French army during World War II who later became a Howard County schoolteacher, died Aug. 1 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lookabout Manor, a Westminster assisted-living facility. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 92. Emma Josephine Guillot was born and raised in Grenoble, France. "Her father was an engineer and math professor who believed in education. She graduated from colleges and universities in France and Spain as well as an art school," said her son, Paul B. Hawkins of Finksburg, a retired Baltimore police officer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
There may be some things wonderful and noble and mythic about war, but you couldn't prove it by World War I.All of the evils that would eventually culminate in World War II, and many of the ills that continue to affect our world today, found their genesis on the battlefields of Europe between 1914 and 1918.That's the central theme of "The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century," an eight-part opus from PBS that kicks off tomorrow night.It's also what makes the series so fascinating and genuinely worth the eight-hour investment of time.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 14, 1994
France's gamble that it could intervene usefully in Rwanda without provoking the bloody fiasco that overtook the U.N. and American interventions in Somalia has succeeded. The allied and African governments that opposed or denigrated the French undertaking owe Paris an apology. They also owe those helped by France a new effort, right now, to see that a sequel to the Rwandan tragedy does not follow in neighboring Burundi.Despite the professionalism and knowledge of the terrain the French have displayed, they began with a serious misapprehension that had to be corrected after forces already were committed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Georges R. Garinther, a retired Army civilian engineer who studied ordnance noise and once examined the acoustics of the John F. Kennedy assassination, died March 9 of complications from heart disease and Alzheimer's disease at his daughter's Havre de Grace home. He was 79. An Army publication described Mr. Garinther as "an international authority on the effects of impulse noise on the hearing of soldiers and on the measurement and analysis of impulse and steady-state noise" when he retired in 1996 from the Aberdeen Proving Ground's Human Engineering Lab. "His job was to save the hearing of soldiers and allow them to communicate better," said a son, Geoff Garinther, a Lutherville resident.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Memorial Day is the day we as a country remember the sacrifices made by the men and women who have fought and fallen in the nation's wars. World War II veterans are dying at a rate of some 1,500 a day, while it is estimated that fewer than 500 veterans from World War I are living. And as those who fought in the "Great War" fade from view, the opportunity to read the unpublished and poignant memoirs of a young Baltimore field artilleryman from those years is a rare and distinct pleasure.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | January 14, 2007
Medieval family day Celebrate the life and legacy of French heroine Joan of Arc at the Medieval Merriment Family Day and Open House on Saturday at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. Visitors can step inside the world of medieval Europe at the all-day event, presented as part of the Joan of Arc exhibit, which runs through Jan. 21. Dancing, storytelling, magic shows, musical performances, art-making workshops, gallery talks and more will be part of the merry celebration honoring the woman who led the French army to victory against England in the 15th century.
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Maurice Bourges-Maunoury, 78, a leader of the French resistance who later held several Cabinet posts, died Wednesday in Paris. He joined the French army as an artillery lieutenant in 1939, was captured by the Germans in 1940 and was set free the next year. He joined the resistance and made repeated clandestine trips between France and Britain. When the allies launched the D-Day invasion, he parachuted into southern France to organize a sabotage campaign. After the war, he won a parliamentary seat for the Radical Party in 1946 and became deputy budget minister in 1947.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Memorial Day is the day we as a country remember the sacrifices made by the men and women who have fought and fallen in the nation's wars. World War II veterans are dying at a rate of some 1,500 a day, while it is estimated that fewer than 500 veterans from World War I are living. And as those who fought in the "Great War" fade from view, the opportunity to read the unpublished and poignant memoirs of a young Baltimore field artilleryman from those years is a rare and distinct pleasure.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
There may be some things wonderful and noble and mythic about war, but you couldn't prove it by World War I.All of the evils that would eventually culminate in World War II, and many of the ills that continue to affect our world today, found their genesis on the battlefields of Europe between 1914 and 1918.That's the central theme of "The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century," an eight-part opus from PBS that kicks off tomorrow night.It's also what makes the series so fascinating and genuinely worth the eight-hour investment of time.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 14, 1994
France's gamble that it could intervene usefully in Rwanda without provoking the bloody fiasco that overtook the U.N. and American interventions in Somalia has succeeded. The allied and African governments that opposed or denigrated the French undertaking owe Paris an apology. They also owe those helped by France a new effort, right now, to see that a sequel to the Rwandan tragedy does not follow in neighboring Burundi.Despite the professionalism and knowledge of the terrain the French have displayed, they began with a serious misapprehension that had to be corrected after forces already were committed.
FEATURES
By STEVE McKERROW | November 2, 1991
In a new movie premiering on cable tonight, star/producer Richard Dreyfuss is asked a simple question by his superior in the French army:"Why did he do it?" asks the general, referring to the allegedspying activity of one Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, the central figure in a celebrated turn-of-the century scandal that some historians believe may have contributed to the onset of World War I.One might ask the same question, however, about Mr. Dreyfuss the actor, and his handsomely mounted but curiously inert film, "Prisoner of Honor."
NEWS
May 26, 1995
Charles Wohlstetter, 85, vice chairman of GTE Corp. and former chairman of Contel Corp., died of a stroke Wednesday in New York. He became vice chairman and director of GTE when it bought Contel in 1991 for $6.6 billion. In 1961, he was one of three co-founders of Contel, which operated telephone services in 32 states and several countries and had annual revenue of $3 billion when GTE bought it.Georges Walther, 80, a French war hero who was a photo supervisor in the Paris bureau of the Associated Press for 35 years, died Tuesday of a blood disorder.
NEWS
April 9, 2006
1791: French soldiers in Annapolis Rather than the British, the French came to Annapolis in April 1781, encamped with soldiers who fought alongside and aided American troops in winning the Revolutionary War. A granite monument honoring unknown French soldiers was dedicated on the edge of the St. John's College's playing fields and creek by President William Howard Taft in April 1911. The French army troops were under the command of Marquis de Lafayette, 24, who cut quite a social swath, even with the Tories.
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